WannabeOrtho

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Hello,

I have posted numerous threads in the Pre-Osteopathic Forum about medical school, and applying. I am going to be a Freshmen at a 4 year University hopefully getting my Bachelors in Biology. I have never taken a college class yet, but want to be way prepared. I plan to shadow a variety of different D.O. Doctors ranging from Radiologists, to General Surgeons atleast for 1-2years. I want to become a Orthopedic Surgeon, and I was sitting here thinking, what did some of the people that are actually in medical school do.

What do YOU think made your application to medical school stand out from everyone elses?

What did YOU do as extra-curricular activity to show you want to help people, and devote your life to medicine?


Thank you in advance.
Justin
 

scpod

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WannabeOrtho said:
I have never taken a college class yet, but want to be way prepared. I plan to shadow a variety of different D.O. Doctors ranging from Radiologists, to General Surgeons atleast for 1-2years.
This isn't going to answer your question, but it's advice that you can either choose to heed or ignore. You should forget about your future for one whole year beginning right now. Don't do any shadowing or even planning for your future career dring your freshman year. Your first year is a time to get adjusted to a totally new way of life. Use it to explore the world and relationships with others. Probably the best thing that you can do is look at what is available on your campus. Join some clubs if you want to. Play some sports if you want to. Go to some parties as well. Spend this time learning how to make long-lasting friendships and get along with others. Learn how to be a well-adjusted college student first, before you start thinking about the future. This is your last chance to really have a lot of fun before buckling down with your studies. The classes that you have to take as a freshman will be the easiest that you will ever take. Don't get me wrong, though, because every single one of them will be harder than most classes you took in high school. So, you also have to learn how to study (don't laugh because most people don't know how at first) and attend classes on a regular basis. You need to learn how to self-motivate because no one is going to be making you go to class anymore-- the choice is yours. Did you know that about half of all freshman lose their sholarships in a lot of colleges after the first year? It's because they get tooooooooo far behind and just can't catch up at the last moment to maintain a B average. You need to get adjusted to this new life before you go out and make a lot of other commitments with your time. You'll need to practice your time management skills, and it will be a lot easier to do that if you just try to be a "regular" college student for a year and not an anal pre-med.
 

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completely agree, and to go with that, during your freshman year, take only one science class per semester. Everyone else is going to be partying and having the time of their life...so should you! You will find that many people will say they are "pre-med" their freshman year (often times just to land the chicks) but only a small number of these will make it through the long haul as pre-meds, and even less will get into medical school. To make yourself one of these people, you must learn to balance social time and school. Start out slow with the one science class per semester thing, and enjoy every minute of it. All four years will be amazing, but nothing beats freshman year.

scpod said:
This isn't going to answer your question, but it's advice that you can either choose to heed or ignore. You should forget about your future for one whole year beginning right now. Don't do any shadowing or even planning for your future career dring your freshman year. Your first year is a time to get adjusted to a totally new way of life. Use it to explore the world and relationships with others. Probably the best thing that you can do is look at what is available on your campus. Join some clubs if you want to. Play some sports if you want to. Go to some parties as well. Spend this time learning how to make long-lasting friendships and get along with others. Learn how to be a well-adjusted college student first, before you start thinking about the future. This is your last chance to really have a lot of fun before buckling down with your studies. The classes that you have to take as a freshman will be the easiest that you will ever take. Don't get me wrong, though, because every single one of them will be harder than most classes you took in high school. So, you also have to learn how to study (don't laugh because most people don't know how at first) and attend classes on a regular basis. You need to learn how to self-motivate because no one is going to be making you go to class anymore-- the choice is yours. Did you know that about half of all freshman lose their sholarships in a lot of colleges after the first year? It's because they get tooooooooo far behind and just can't catch up at the last moment to maintain a B average. You need to get adjusted to this new life before you go out and make a lot of other commitments with your time. You'll need to practice your time management skills, and it will be a lot easier to do that if you just try to be a "regular" college student for a year and not an anal pre-med.
 
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WannabeOrtho

WannabeOrtho

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Thanks for the replys. The whole partying thing doesn't really fit me. I have never drank, and never will. With a father who I have seen drunk, and a sister who I have seen drunk I have absolutely no feelings for drinking, or partying. I really don't "go" out as I do not like the people in the surroding areas. My college is only 10-15mins away, and I will probably have met/known half the people there. I'm not really into all that. Want to know what I have done all summer? Work a hospital as a valet parker. Be with my girlfriend of 1 year and 3months. Read numerous pleasure books. I am not the whole "hanging out at my buds" type of person at all. Thanks again for the reply. I plan to take around 18 credit hours, as that is what I was signed up for before. Thank you once again, I love hearing opinions/suggestions from different people to know what really works, and what is just a dream but reality it cannot be possible without being a genius. I will try to get a above average course load to help stand out though. =)

Justin
 

Krazykritter

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Wannabe,

Here's a piece of advice after reading your last post...A huge part of getting into Ortho is your attitude (along w/ stellar board scores)& how well you get along with the other surgeons. 'Not being the whole hanging out at my buds' will not help you get along w/ other Orthopods. I would suggest you use your college career to become more outgoing & learn to get along w/ a wide variety of people. Improving your skills in these areas will never hurt you even if you don't end up in medicine.
 

MikeyLu2010

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krazykritter has a very good point...You will need excellent clinical grades...which you will later find out to be extremely subjective..so being a "people-person" is essential..thats of course if you still decide to do ortho in 8 years :)
 

scpod

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WannabeOrtho said:
The whole partying thing doesn't really fit me. I have never drank, and never will. With a father who I have seen drunk, and a sister who I have seen drunk I have absolutely no feelings for drinking, or partying.
Having a "party" doesn't have to include drinking. It's about people getting together and blowing off a little steam and enjoying yourself.

WannabeOrtho said:
I really don't "go" out as I do not like the people in the surroding areas...I am not the whole "hanging out at my buds" type of person at all.
The ability to get along with others will be a huge asset for you in the future. I suggest that you learn to start "liking" the others. Med school committees aren't exactly looking for loners who don't like the people around them.

WannabeOrtho said:
Thanks again for the reply. I plan to take around 18 credit hours, as that is what I was signed up for before... I will try to get a above average course load to help stand out though.
I don't know who you are planning on standing out to, because I don't know of anybody who gives a damn about how many hours you take a semester, but you should be more concerned with making good grades in the first year and developing better people skills. You're going to have to get along with, and work very closely with, a lot of people that you don't like in the coming years. You really need practice now at doing it. Being an Orthopod is kind of like joining a fraternity. It really doesn't matter how good your grades and scores are if they don't vote you into the fraternity as one of them. They have to accept you as a "brother." Your attitude has a lot of changing to do before you can ever be accepted. Hopefully, that's what college will do for you. You've got to become a part of the process and play the game just like everyone else. Just getting into medical school is about more than grades and MCAT. They don't just pick all of those people from the 90th percentile in each class and give them a seat; they have interviews. You see, medical schools can teach you all about the things you know to become a doctor except for people skills and how to get along well with others. So, they look for people that have already developed those on their own. Plus, they ALL recommend that you use study partners in med school. In fact, those people who have study partners do better than loners. You might not need it in undergrad, but you will later. It won't hurt to get some practice in on that now too.
 
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WannabeOrtho

WannabeOrtho

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Krazykritter said:
Wannabe,

Here's a piece of advice after reading your last post...A huge part of getting into Ortho is your attitude (along w/ stellar board scores)& how well you get along with the other surgeons. 'Not being the whole hanging out at my buds' will not help you get along w/ other Orthopods. I would suggest you use your college career to become more outgoing & learn to get along w/ a wide variety of people. Improving your skills in these areas will never hurt you even if you don't end up in medicine.

I don't really understand that. I am definitely a people person, but somehow I am thinking your telling me to be a people person you must hang out with people, and be a typical party college student. I cannot figure out what's wrong with just going to school to learn, and that's that. Go to work, and do my job. I mean I don't mean I wont ever go to dinner, or help him/her work on their car, or something of that sort. But why must it include "hanging out", or "clubbing", or drinking in any fashion? I am also outgoing, but I feel I am outgoing with a different standard of people that do not drink, or go to bars, or to partys. I'm not saying the people that do that are bad, just that it is not for me at all. With having a sister who was the party girl, always drinking, and such I learned that it's useless. They will be your friend for awhile but if they mess up, or want to copy your homework, or something and you don't let them, it's all over. I haven't time for little games like that. I'm more of the type of guy you see sitting on the bench in the corner in the sun reading a good novel. I hate the typical college jock type of guy. Also everywhere I read it talks about Orthopedic Surgeons being in sports, or being a jock, or something like that. Why? Can you not just have good scores, e-c's, and be committed to medicine, and surgery to do good?

I may sound kind of thrashing, but I am not meaning to I just hate the average college student who is the original drunk, party, hoe around with girls, and such.
 

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The picture I attached...that was what made my med school application stand out.

JUST KIDDING...I think it was that I was well rounded. I didn't "stand out" anywhere, but I was extremely consistent, no "red flags". For undergrad, the only thing you need to do is make sure you are a good medical school applicant. Forget orthopedics for the next 6 years. Enjoy undergrad, do well on MCAT, get in, do well in med school, do well on Step 1....then think about Ortho.

I think what they are pointing out is that being in Orthopedics is sometimes in its own way kind of like being in a frat. I don't like to categorize people, but usually orthopods are pretty easy to pick out in a group. The male ones are the ones that are the boys-boy or the "popular" one in the group. They are confident (sometimes even cocky). Right now, the only thing you have to worry about is going to undergrad, having a good time, being involved, getting good grades, etc.
 

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I'll give you some advice... I know that my application did not stand out on GPA or MCAT scores. But what may have made the difference (granted we do not know what the real reason for being accepted is) was my dedication to learning. Spending more than the number of years needed to complete my pre-med courses and taking many more to provide myself with a well rounded education. As I always say, "Its not about the destination thats important, it is about the journey... enjoy the journey."

Another thing I did, which I feel was important, was to be trained as a phlebotomist and then work in the field for three years. You cannot learn to do phlebotomy in a few days, it takes at least a year before you are able to handle most of the situations that come your way. I wanted to show myself and the admissions that I was able to handle a stressful and demanding medical occupation. Just shadowing, in my opinion, will never give you the full experience of stress and responsibility found in the medical world.

Oh ya... and research helps too.

Good luck to ya, and enjoy the journey,
-B
 

Krazykritter

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WannabeOrtho said:
I don't really understand that. I am definitely a people person, but somehow I am thinking your telling me to be a people person you must hang out with people, and be a typical party college student. I cannot figure out what's wrong with just going to school to learn, and that's that. Go to work, and do my job. I mean I don't mean I wont ever go to dinner, or help him/her work on their car, or something of that sort. But why must it include "hanging out", or "clubbing", or drinking in any fashion? I am also outgoing, but I feel I am outgoing with a different standard of people that do not drink, or go to bars, or to partys. I'm not saying the people that do that are bad, just that it is not for me at all. With having a sister who was the party girl, always drinking, and such I learned that it's useless. They will be your friend for awhile but if they mess up, or want to copy your homework, or something and you don't let them, it's all over. I haven't time for little games like that. I'm more of the type of guy you see sitting on the bench in the corner in the sun reading a good novel. I hate the typical college jock type of guy. Also everywhere I read it talks about Orthopedic Surgeons being in sports, or being a jock, or something like that. Why? Can you not just have good scores, e-c's, and be committed to medicine, and surgery to do good?

I may sound kind of thrashing, but I am not meaning to I just hate the average college student who is the original drunk, party, hoe around with girls, and such.
If you hate the typical college jock type, ortho is probably NOT for you.

#1. The vast majority of orthopods are this type of person because many ortho injuries/cases involve the crowd that you previously mentioned you hated, but that happens to be their interest.

#2. As already mentioned, the majority of ortho cases are sports related & guess what...athletes/jocks are your patients.

#3. Sitting in the corner reading a novel is great, but as an orthopedic surgeon you will most likely have to cover sporting events as this is also a great way to bring in clients (again athletes) to your clinic.

No one (especially me) told you that you have to go out drinking & I never mentioned clubbing.

This is in no way meant to be cutting you down...If you don't like jocks or people with that type of personality & don't think that power tools in the OR are about the greatest thing since canned beer & night baseball (I think I remember you saying in another post that you aren't that interested in nuts & bolts mechanic stuff)...what draws you to orthopedic surgery???
 
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WannabeOrtho

WannabeOrtho

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Krazykritter said:
If you hate the typical college jock type, ortho is probably NOT for you.

#1. The vast majority of orthopods are this type of person because many ortho injuries/cases involve the crowd that you previously mentioned you hated, but that happens to be their interest.

#2. As already mentioned, the majority of ortho cases are sports related & guess what...athletes/jocks are your patients.

#3. Sitting in the corner reading a novel is great, but as an orthopedic surgeon you will most likely have to cover sporting events as this is also a great way to bring in clients (again athletes) to your clinic.

No one (especially me) told you that you have to go out drinking & I never mentioned clubbing.

This is in no way meant to be cutting you down...If you don't like jocks or people with that type of personality & don't think that power tools in the OR are about the greatest thing since canned beer & night baseball (I think I remember you saying in another post that you aren't that interested in nuts & bolts mechanic stuff)...what draws you to orthopedic surgery???
No, no! lol. I think you took my reply wrong. I LOVE sports. I hate the "jocks" of the sports, the cocky guys who think they are the best of the best. I think to myself everyday on somethings that no matter how hard you try there is probably someone else in this world that has tried harder, or will.(Kind of a motivation thing to keep myself trying my hardest in everything.) I don't recall posting a comment/thread about not liking nuts, and bolts, but I do hate stripped nuts and bolts. I also like power tools, lol. But that isn't what draws me. What draws me is the fascination of the human body bones, and how they are aligned, and work togather. I would love to fix someones broken arm, leg, or heel. Cutting them layers of skin to expose the bone would be my dream. I also wouldn't mind being a ER doctor though, but my dream would be being a surgeon. I may find out once I am in medical school that I definitely would not like being a surgeon so who knows but for rightnow I guess I'll say I want to be a surgeon....
 

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hey,
i think its great that you want to get a head start. and if i had your kinds foresight, i probably would be in a much better situation right now, but please do hear the others on here.
i dont drink or go clubbing either, but ive definitely made some great friends that i will have for the rest of my life. i think college is very important in terms of becoming who you really will be the rest of your life. enjoy it!
in terms of "standing out" get involved with research with a prof, and get involved with some volunteering early on. finally, get involved with some kind of a part-time job, which is good for a little cash and a nice recco down the line.
good luck!
 

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