what's the advantage of matching into a prestigious hospital

Reborn24

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I don't understand why people make such a big deal about getting into a competive place vs. someone who did it in a community hospital as long as they ultimately are in the same specialty
 

Bfriccia1

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Weirdoc said:
I don't understand why people make such a big deal about getting into a competive place vs. someone who did it in a community hospital as long as they ultimately are in the same specialty
For the most part , it only matters if you want to go into academic medicine. More prestigious hospitals generally have better connections/research opportunities for this type of thing.
 

orientedtoself

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Matching at a good university hospital program can also help you get a fellowship.
 

YouDontKnowJack

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orientedtoself said:
Matching at a good university hospital program can also help you get a fellowship.

but so can many years of experience, right?
 

getunconcsious

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I know nothing about residency cuz I am not even close to that far yet, but I think medicine attracts the type of people that obsess over prestige and rankings, so even if it doesn't matter that much they just like to obsess about it. Gives us something to get up in the morning for I guess?
 

RustNeverSleeps

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YouDontKnowJack said:
but so can many years of experience, right?

If someone plans to go into a competitive fellowship (for instance cards or hem-onc), going to a prestigious residency program helps. The "many years of experience" really isn't applicable because everyone going into a fellowship will have done a residency...
 

zeloc

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getunconcsious said:
I know nothing about residency cuz I am not even close to that far yet, but I think medicine attracts the type of people that obsess over prestige and rankings, so even if it doesn't matter that much they just like to obsess about it. Gives us something to get up in the morning for I guess?
I don't understand why it is. You would think that people going into this profession would be the exact opposite.
 

getunconcsious

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zeloc said:
I don't understand why it is. You would think that people going into this profession would be the exact opposite.

No, the altruists go into teaching, social work, nursing, etc...I think you have to be at least a *little* power hungry to be in this. I haven't met any true blue bleeding heart altruists in med school. And I'm certainly no exception to the rule but ya know just pointing out...
 

RustNeverSleeps

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zeloc said:
I don't understand why it is. You would think that people going into this profession would be the exact opposite.

I don't know...Medicine is a profession for driven people and high achievers. I think it's hard for some people to put these qualities entirely aside -- and that this can sometimes be manifest as a concern for rankings and prestige.

In addition, I might be reading too many people's posts, but I don't think concern about prestige and rankings is necessarily bad. For people pursuing academic medicine or competitive specialties/fellowships, the prestige of your residency program can be quite important. But I guess this again reflects the high-achieving nature of people drawn to medicine... ;)
 

CatsandCradles

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getunconcsious said:
No, the altruists go into teaching, social work, nursing, etc...I think you have to be at least a *little* power hungry to be in this. I haven't met any true blue bleeding heart altruists in med school. And I'm certainly no exception to the rule but ya know just pointing out...
I think I'm with you on that. I always ask myself all sorts of questions to tear myself apart a bit in order to keep myself in more or less in line.

But I think there are a few really good alturistic doctors out there (I'm not one of them). One name that comes to mind is Paul Farmer who is an infectious disease specialist working in Haiti all of his life. He really puts the rest of the medical community to shame - and for some good reason too.

But then again, he graduated #2 at Harvard and did his residency at some famous hospital in Boston :)