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When is a residency a requirement?

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BunnyVet*

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Hey there! This may be a bit of a dumb question, but I’ve heard some conflicting information about when a residency is and is not required for certain interests. I’m an older student and want to settle down in the same state as my SO (who lives in a state without a vet school and who can’t move because of his job) and have a family before I’m too much on the older side. I’m not 100% sure what I’d like to do yet and as a first year student, I have time to figure it out, but it’d be nice to be armed with all the information possible as I prepare for my vet career in school. I’m thinking about GP including companion exotic/service animal practice (I wouldn’t want to do just dogs and cats), wildlife rehab (probably more as a pro bono side thing), ECC, or teaching. I’ve heard that teaching requires a residency (although I do have a MS already so I could get by without a PhD) and that ECC without a residency is more limited to outpatient care. However, if I wanted to do GP with small mammal, avian, and reptile companion animals would being board-certified be an absolute requirement? If it is, I’ve heard some people say that it’s harder to get a residency match after being in GP practice for a few years. Any thoughts? Thank you for any help or advice! :)
 

WhtsThFrequency

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Hey there! This may be a bit of a dumb question, but I’ve heard some conflicting information about when a residency is and is not required for certain interests. I’m an older student and want to settle down in the same state as my SO (who lives in a state without a vet school and who can’t move because of his job) and have a family before I’m too much on the older side. I’m not 100% sure what I’d like to do yet and as a first year student, I have time to figure it out, but it’d be nice to be armed with all the information possible as I prepare for my vet career in school. I’m thinking about GP including companion exotic/service animal practice (I wouldn’t want to do just dogs and cats), wildlife rehab (probably more as a pro bono side thing), ECC, or teaching. I’ve heard that teaching requires a residency (although I do have a MS already so I could get by without a PhD) and that ECC without a residency is more limited to outpatient care. However, if I wanted to do GP with small mammal, avian, and reptile companion animals would being board-certified be an absolute requirement? If it is, I’ve heard some people say that it’s harder to get a residency match after being in GP practice for a few years. Any thoughts? Thank you for any help or advice! :)

Not if you are talking about faculty teaching jobs at vet schools. The PhD (and usually also specialization) is required for most positions, and is highly preferred for most others. You might be able to swing a non-tenure track clinical prof appointment without one ( I know several faculty who have), but you'd still be in competition with others who have it. Look up the faculty list at vet schools and see how many of them have PhDs - many if not most.

If you really want to pursue a faculty job, a PhD might be a necessity depending on what you specialize in and the type of appointment you want to get. Just something to keep in mind.

Honestly, GP with some exotics on the side could easily be done without board certification in anything.
 
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VetMedSurvivalGuide

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The answer to your questions is highly variable. It really depends on which career you end up choosing. If the goal is to become a tenure-track faculty, a PhD is going to be needed as most people applying will have one. If you want GP with some exotics, you don't have to become board certified. If you wanted to, then ABVP certification would likely be best. As an ECC specialist, you likely wouldn't be in a position to see exotics unless those cases are coming in on emergency.
 
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