Oct 7, 2014
61
8
Truckee, CA
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm trying to figure out where I should be looking at applying. Any advice would be much appreciated. Taking new MCAT in April, applying this June. We are willing to move anywhere (besides Dakotas and the midwest, unless its Nashville). Any advice is much appreciated.

Here's my stats:


30 yrs old.
ER Scribe (PT)
Project Manager (Construction & Architecture)

Degrees:
Worcester Polytechnic Institute: BS Mathematics & Civil Engineering, Minor Law & Technology
University of Colorado at Boulder: MS Civil Engineering Systems

GPA
3.204762 Undergraduate GPA
3.272727 Master GPA
3.573239 Post + Masters GPA
3.834211 Post Grad
3.055556 Undergraduate BCMP
3.782759 Post Grad BCMP
3.309639
Total BCMP GPA
3.319256
Total GPA

MCAT: 30-32

RESEARCH: 5 first author published papers by June 2015 (1 in process currently)

OTHER:
Started Research based non-profit (USTPC)
5 years on US SKI TEAM
10 years of Ski Coaching
 

QofQuimica

Seriously, dude, I think you're overreacting....
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Info we need:
1) What state are you a resident of? (I'm guessing Colorado?)
2) Is your MCAT score actually 30-32, or are you guessing based on practice tests? If it's the latter, any specific advice we give you will be low yield without an actual MCAT score. I suggest that you take the MCAT and re-post again once you have an actual score.
3) Will you be applying to DO schools as well, or MD-only?
4) It is not necessary to round your GPAs to the millionth decimal place. It is also not necessary to post eight different GPAs in various random combinations; I have no idea how to interpret half the GPAs you posted. To avoid confusion, just post the standard applicant GPAs and round them to the standard hundredth decimal place. These include your overall UG GPA (UG + post bac), your overall post-bac GPA (shows trends), and your science UG GPA (UG + post bac BCMP). The grad GPA is not very important in this context and should not be combined with your UG GPAs, as AMCAS reports them separately.

Info you need:
1) Nashville is most definitely NOT part of the Midwest.
2) By dismissing the entire Midwest out-of-hand, you're missing out on being able to apply to a lot of good schools that get far fewer apps compared to schools on the coasts just because of location. It's also significantly cheaper to live in the Midwest compared to the coasts, which is relevant when you're on a student budget.
 

DrMidlife

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"Post grad" isn't a good descriptor here. Use "Postbaccalaureate" or "postbac" to describe undergrad work after receiving a bachelors. Keep grad work separate from undergrad (which I think you have). Grad work that isn't in biosci is effectively an extra-curricular activity, so your grad GPAs are effectively neutral.

The 3.3x numbers here will determine your fate more than anything else, and the better your MCAT, the better your odds. Put everything you've got into that MCAT: money, time, character development. But, honestly, even with your excellent postbac/grad effort, your 3.3 argues for you to invest in applying DO as well as MD. (Unfortunately RVU is a rotten place to spend $350k on a medical education, but there are some DO schools that are quite outstanding.)

Obviously, focus on U of Colorado. You have no advantages elsewhere. In particular, publics (UCalif/UWash/OHSU/UA/UNM/UU) want out-of-state applicants in the top 5% of the applicant pool. They have no responsibility to the lower-GPA applicants from other states. Leaving the midwest out of contention is lowering your chances quite a bit.

One of two things is likely, based on my experience with Coloradans and SDNers. One: you'll get love from Colorado in your first go-round. Two: you won't get love from Colorado in your first go-round, and you'll have to take more steps to recover from your 3.3x numbers, such as an SMP.

Best of luck to you.
 
OP
Flippinski
Oct 7, 2014
61
8
Truckee, CA
Status
Pre-Medical
Looking for advice on where to apply. I'm a veteran, honorably discharged, will be using GI Bill benefits to pay for medical school (so cost doesn't matter it will all be covered). Also get a housing stipend while in school (so if its NY its $3800, San Fran $3900 est.). Any advice is much appreciated!

Here's my stats:

California Resident
Service Connected Disabled Veteran (as of new law, get in state tuition classification in all states effective Aug 2015)
30 yrs old.
ER Scribe (PT)
Project Manager (Construction & Architecture)
Applying June 2015

Degrees:
Worcester Polytechnic Institute: BS Mathematics & Civil Engineering, Minor Law & Technology
University of Colorado at Boulder: MS Civil Engineering Systems

GPA
3.3 UGPA
3.8 Postbac GPA
3.1 uBCMP GPA
3.8 Postbac BCMP
3.3 Total BCMP

MCAT: 30

RESEARCH: 5 first author published papers by June 2015 (1 in process currently)

EC's:
Volunteering at VA Palo Alto under Stanford Teaching Neurosurgeon
Volunteer with SOS Outreach - skiing charity teaching at risk youth
Volunteer with Boys & Girls Club - teaching Engineering seminar to kids 5-8
10 years of tutoring
10 years of ski safety research
Math Club
Lots of work history
Started Research based non-profit (USTPC)
5 years on US SKI TEAM
10 years of Ski Coaching

POSSIBLE SCHOOLS:
Temple, Drexel, CU Denver, UVM, UC Davis, Stanford (a reach), Oregon, Tufts, UCSF, Brown, Utah, Quinnipiac, Albany, Commonwealth, Tulane, Dartmouth, Washington, Hofstra, SUNY upstate, NYMC, Meharry..

What are your thoughts on these schools and what other ones should I look at?
 

DrMidlife

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California is a rotten place to try to get into med school with below average numbers. At least you're asking before you start applying.

You would have reasonable instate odds with a 3.3/30 in Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi et al. Everywhere else you are about 2 std devs below the matriculant average.

Temple, Drexel, Tufts, Albany, Tulane, NYMC ->these are the schools that get 10k+ applications from low-GPA students, go ahead and get in the pile
CU Denver, Utah, Washington, SUNY upstate -> not at all OOS friendly unless you bring a 3.8/38
UVM -> extremely OOS-friendly but still a reach if you're not in the top slice of OOS applicants. Boatloads of OOS apply here because it's OOS friendly.
UC Davis -> your best chance at staying in California, along with UCI & USC, but still really poor odds with below average numbers
UCSF -> as reachy as Stanford, along with UCSD, UCLA
Dartmouth, Stanford (a reach) -> extreme reaches
Brown -> this is an Ivy with a big BS/MD program, imho not a lot of fun if you're over 25, but that's beside the point that Brown is only slightly less reachy than Dartmouth
Oregon -> moderate OOS friendliness but again, takes the top slice of OOS applicants
Meharry -> and your reason for wanting to attend a HBC is?
Quinnipiac, Commonwealth, Hofstra -> dunno, too new
Bottom line, you're doing the same school shopping as the other 45,000 applicants. 20,000 won't get accepted anywhere. Every year. Respect your competition.

And just so we're clear, I applied to most of these schools and more as a mature accomplished interesting humorous credentialed individual with below average numbers. Wanna see my rejection letter pile from that year, 36 for 36? I had to do an SMP to get into a US MD school.

Best of luck to you.
 
OP
Flippinski
Oct 7, 2014
61
8
Truckee, CA
Status
Pre-Medical
California is a rotten place to try to get into med school with below average numbers. At least you're asking before you start applying.

You would have reasonable instate odds with a 3.3/30 in Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi et al. Everywhere else you are about 2 std devs below the matriculant average.

Temple, Drexel, Tufts, Albany, Tulane, NYMC ->these are the schools that get 10k+ applications from low-GPA students, go ahead and get in the pile
CU Denver, Utah, Washington, SUNY upstate -> not at all OOS friendly unless you bring a 3.8/38
UVM -> extremely OOS-friendly but still a reach if you're not in the top slice of OOS applicants. Boatloads of OOS apply here because it's OOS friendly.
UC Davis -> your best chance at staying in California, along with UCI & USC, but still really poor odds with below average numbers
UCSF -> as reachy as Stanford, along with UCSD, UCLA
Dartmouth, Stanford (a reach) -> extreme reaches
Brown -> this is an Ivy with a big BS/MD program, imho not a lot of fun if you're over 25, but that's beside the point that Brown is only slightly less reachy than Dartmouth
Oregon -> moderate OOS friendliness but again, takes the top slice of OOS applicants
Meharry -> and your reason for wanting to attend a HBC is?
Quinnipiac, Commonwealth, Hofstra -> dunno, too new
Bottom line, you're doing the same school shopping as the other 45,000 applicants. 20,000 won't get accepted anywhere. Every year. Respect your competition.

And just so we're clear, I applied to most of these schools and more as a mature accomplished interesting humorous credentialed individual with below average numbers. Wanna see my rejection letter pile from that year, 36 for 36? I had to do an SMP to get into a US MD school.

Best of luck to you.

Yeah, the odds are more stacked against me for sure. Went to the UC Davis Pre Health conference and the thing that stood out the most for me was....your personal essay. Everything I heard in every workshope said, if you are below average in numbers, you HAVE to stick out in your personal essay. It needs to be that one that the admissions officer remembers...and if you can do that, with good EC's, and recommendations, you have a shot at an interview. Stanford director of admissions specified...if you can prove to us you bring diversity, that you are a gamechanger, then you have a shot. Shot some ideas off, and they said Skiing is my lifeline. They can't remember any applicants with that background and it will definitely set you apart...so work with it. Every job I have ever interviewed for I have received (probably worked over 20 places). I'm a great interviewer, great with people, just need the invite. Also going to apply to Post Bach programs with linkage in case I don't get in first round (help with the GPA thing I guess if that is why i get denied).

Also, whats and HBC in regards to MeharrY?
 

silleme

SDN Lifetime Donor
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Jan 2, 2012
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Status
Pre-Medical
Also, whats and HBC in regards to MeharrY?
I can get this one...it's a Historically Black College. Meharry, Howard, and Morehouse all fall into this category. They tend to be friendlier to applicants who want to focus on underserved communities, and have a volunteer or work history that proves that.
 
OP
Flippinski
Oct 7, 2014
61
8
Truckee, CA
Status
Pre-Medical
"Post grad" isn't a good descriptor here. Use "Postbaccalaureate" or "postbac" to describe undergrad work after receiving a bachelors. Keep grad work separate from undergrad (which I think you have). Grad work that isn't in biosci is effectively an extra-curricular activity, so your grad GPAs are effectively neutral.

The 3.3x numbers here will determine your fate more than anything else, and the better your MCAT, the better your odds. Put everything you've got into that MCAT: money, time, character development. But, honestly, even with your excellent postbac/grad effort, your 3.3 argues for you to invest in applying DO as well as MD. (Unfortunately RVU is a rotten place to spend $350k on a medical education, but there are some DO schools that are quite outstanding.)

Obviously, focus on U of Colorado. You have no advantages elsewhere. In particular, publics (UCalif/UWash/OHSU/UA/UNM/UU) want out-of-state applicants in the top 5% of the applicant pool. They have no responsibility to the lower-GPA applicants from other states. Leaving the midwest out of contention is lowering your chances quite a bit.

One of two things is likely, based on my experience with Coloradans and SDNers. One: you'll get love from Colorado in your first go-round. Two: you won't get love from Colorado in your first go-round, and you'll have to take more steps to recover from your 3.3x numbers, such as an SMP.

Best of luck to you.
Meharry falls within my GPA range and its in nashville, somewhere my husband and I wouldn't mind moving to for four years.
 

Prncssbuttercup

Established Member -- Family Medicine Resident
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Why is RVU not a consideration for CO? Dr. Midlife, just because you have a beef with their FP status versus, say LECOM's supposed NPO status, doesn't mean it's POS school (also, I don't believe you go to school here, so are ill equipped to say anything about it). If you're military or ex-military RVU is a great school, they love military people. We have a 99-100% first time pass rate, and high averages on our board scores. I have friends at RVU who are CO residents, born and raised, with better stats and they were rejected from CU. I have friends who went to school AT CU and had good stats and they were rejected, some have masters degrees as well. We haven't had anyone not match so far, so I am not sure where the 'crappy place to spend 350k' comes from, it is baseless.
 
Last edited:

silleme

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Why is RVU not a consideration for CO? Dr. Midlife, just because you have a beef with their FP status versus, say LECOM's supposed NPO status, doesn't mean it's POS school (also, I don't believe you go to school here, so are ill equipped to say anything about it). If you're military or ex-military RVU is a great school, they love military people. We have a 99-100% first time pass rate, and high averages on our board scores. I have friends at RVU who are CO residents, born and raised, with better stats and they were rejected from CU. I have friends who went to school AT CU and had good stats and they were rejected, some have masters degrees as well. We haven't had anyone not match so far, so I am not sure where the 'crappy place to spend 350k' comes from, it is baseless.
I'm thinking maybe it's because $350k is a lot more than a lot of other schools on their list of possibilities and the GI Bill (if they're using it) will only pay in-state tuition rates....so they'll still be left with student loans. If the whole point is to position yourself the best financially, applying to only schools that have in-state tuition rates would be their best bet, regardless of MD or DO. I don't know anything about RVU, but I do know that $350k is a huge chunk of change for just tuition, and since that's my main concern, regardless of the name of the school it'd bump it down on my personal list.

Since it looks like they're looking pretty much only at location, they have a lot to look at, and any OPINIONS are helpful as more data to comb through usually makes for a more informed decision.

Just my 2 cents though. I don't really know anyone here, but I wouldn't get my knickers in a knot over someone having a differing opinion. You presented your reason you disagree, and that works too. Hope ya'll can just agree to disagree and keep the thread on-track.
 

ConsultantMD

7+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2009
1,001
1,034
Status
Medical Student
Looking for advice on where to apply. I'm a veteran, honorably discharged, will be using GI Bill benefits to pay for medical school (so cost doesn't matter it will all be covered). Also get a housing stipend while in school (so if its NY its $3800, San Fran $3900 est.). Any advice is much appreciated!

Here's my stats:

California Resident
Service Connected Disabled Veteran (as of new law, get in state tuition classification in all states effective Aug 2015)
30 yrs old.
ER Scribe (PT)
Project Manager (Construction & Architecture)
Applying June 2015

Degrees:
Worcester Polytechnic Institute: BS Mathematics & Civil Engineering, Minor Law & Technology
University of Colorado at Boulder: MS Civil Engineering Systems

GPA
3.3 UGPA
3.8 Postbac GPA
3.1 uBCMP GPA
3.8 Postbac BCMP
3.3 Total BCMP

MCAT: 30

RESEARCH: 5 first author published papers by June 2015 (1 in process currently)

EC's:
Volunteering at VA Palo Alto under Stanford Teaching Neurosurgeon
Volunteer with SOS Outreach - skiing charity teaching at risk youth
Volunteer with Boys & Girls Club - teaching Engineering seminar to kids 5-8
10 years of tutoring
10 years of ski safety research
Math Club
Lots of work history
Started Research based non-profit (USTPC)
5 years on US SKI TEAM
10 years of Ski Coaching

POSSIBLE SCHOOLS:
Temple, Drexel, CU Denver, UVM, UC Davis, Stanford (a reach), Oregon, Tufts, UCSF, Brown, Utah, Quinnipiac, Albany, Commonwealth, Tulane, Dartmouth, Washington, Hofstra, SUNY upstate, NYMC, Meharry..

What are your thoughts on these schools and what other ones should I look at?
Our numbers are kind of similar except my MCAT is in the top 5%. I believe you have the best shot at schools with fewer applicants because you will definitely stand out and not drown because of the numbers game with your GPA. Based on my experience I'd say don't be afraid to reach. I applied to 5 of the top 10 research schools and I have 2 iis and 1 rejection so far which I am thrilled about. I worked in a niche area of healthcare and had several years of life experience. I'd say try your best on the new MCAT and then hit that personal statement hard! Good luck!
 
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QofQuimica

Seriously, dude, I think you're overreacting....
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What are your thoughts on these schools and what other ones should I look at?
You have a great post-bac GPA and a reasonably competitive MCAT score for allo schools, both of which are in your favor. However, as DrM pointed out, your overall stats are significantly below par for the majority of the schools on your list, and you are targeting the same group of schools that the majority of your competitors (many of whom have better stats than you do) are targeting. If your goal is to optimize your odds of getting into medical school, then you should do one of two things: broaden your apps to target schools in the Midwest that get fewer apps (because, like you, many people don't want to move to the Midwest); or broaden your apps to include DO schools where your stats will be more competitive. Or both. I'd also suggest applying to more schools than you've listed, especially if you're going to only apply to coastal allo schools (more in the range of 30-35). And I agree that Meharry does not seem like an appropriate choice for you given that you do not have a significant record of working with underserved minority communities.

Using the skiing as a hook....that's a crapshoot depending on who reads your app. Personally, I wouldn't find a PS about skiing appealing; it's not a sport I follow or care about, and it has minimal relevance to your future development as a physician. I'm actually much more impressed with your service record, particularly your teaching/tutoring experience and that you started a nonprofit research organization. Based on that list, if I was interviewing you, I would most want to hear more about your safety research and USTPC work. (I was interested enough that I googled USTPC to see what it was.) Keep in mind that your PS should first and foremost answer the question, "Why medicine?", and you should include relevant experiences you've had to back that up. Thus, I suggest highlighting your service and research activities in your PS as opposed to focusing on skiing itself. Your military service is also a major positive that should definitely be discussed on your app.

Finally, apologies in advance if this is obvious, but you should probably not mention that you've worked at over 20 places on your app. Adcoms are evaluating you as a possible future colleague. While many people change jobs every few years these days, I'm not sure that changing jobs on average once every six months of your entire adult life up to this point is something I'd go out of my way to highlight. When you list your activities, pick the more relevant jobs, and leave the minor ones out (or, if you've had multiple jobs that are similar, such as multiple ski coaching jobs, you can combine them together under one activity of "ski coaching").

Overall, if you apply strategically, I think you should be reasonably competitive to get into medical school this year. Best of luck you. :)
 
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xffan624

5+ Year Member
Jan 6, 2013
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Looking for advice on where to apply. I'm a veteran, honorably discharged, will be using GI Bill benefits to pay for medical school (so cost doesn't matter it will all be covered). Also get a housing stipend while in school (so if its NY its $3800, San Fran $3900 est.). Any advice is much appreciated!

What are your thoughts on these schools and what other ones should I look at?
Do you qualify for vocational rehabilitation? Otherwise where you go to school does matter for GI Bill, it only pays like $19K for private schools (which is a drop in the bucket at most of those) so you want to focus on the state schools. I wasn't aware of the new policy for disabled vets. That's awesome. Didn't have that when I applied, but I was still in the military when I applied so most states would have allowed me to rapidly establish residency to qualify for state tuition. When I applied, I still added some private schools, but I mostly applied to state schools.

If you don't mind living in Virginia, I would add EVMS. It's a state school that likes non-trads and probably veterans too (lots of military in the area). Got an interview there with similar stats although I did have some connections to VA as I grew up there. Also got an interview at UA-Tuscon and from what I saw during that day, a lot of folks interviewed were from California.
 
OP
Flippinski
Oct 7, 2014
61
8
Truckee, CA
Status
Pre-Medical
You have a great post-bac GPA and a reasonably competitive MCAT score for allo schools, both of which are in your favor. However, as DrM pointed out, your overall stats are significantly below par for the majority of the schools on your list, and you are targeting the same group of schools that the majority of your competitors (many of whom have better stats than you do) are targeting. If your goal is to optimize your odds of getting into medical school, then you should do one of two things: broaden your apps to target schools in the Midwest that get fewer apps (because, like you, many people don't want to move to the Midwest); or broaden your apps to include DO schools where your stats will be more competitive. Or both. I'd also suggest applying to more schools than you've listed, especially if you're going to only apply to coastal allo schools (more in the range of 30-35). And I agree that Meharry does not seem like an appropriate choice for you given that you do not have a significant record of working with underserved minority communities.

Using the skiing as a hook....that's a crapshoot depending on who reads your app. Personally, I wouldn't find a PS about skiing appealing; it's not a sport I follow or care about, and it has minimal relevance to your future development as a physician. I'm actually much more impressed with your service record, particularly your teaching/tutoring experience and that you started a nonprofit research organization. Based on that list, if I was interviewing you, I would most want to hear more about your safety research and USTPC work. (I was interested enough that I googled USTPC to see what it was.) Keep in mind that your PS should first and foremost answer the question, "Why medicine?", and you should include relevant experiences you've had to back that up. Thus, I suggest highlighting your service and research activities in your PS as opposed to focusing on skiing itself. Your military service is also a major positive that should definitely be discussed on your app.

Finally, apologies in advance if this is obvious, but you should probably not mention that you've worked at over 20 places on your app. Adcoms are evaluating you as a possible future colleague. While many people change jobs every few years these days, I'm not sure that changing jobs on average once every six months of your entire adult life up to this point is something I'd go out of my way to highlight. When you list your activities, pick the more relevant jobs, and leave the minor ones out (or, if you've had multiple jobs that are similar, such as multiple ski coaching jobs, you can combine them together under one activity of "ski coaching").

Overall, if you apply strategically, I think you should be reasonably competitive to get into medical school this year. Best of luck you. :)
Great advice. Thank you. Only thing is, that skiing to me all various ways I've incorporated it into my life has very much prepared me with a skill set that most medical schools state in their mission statement they're looking for. Also helped me discover my love for teaching and research, and seeing that my research is based around ski safety research, a ski safety non profit, and everything I have learned along the way, it's really a great theme for my personal statement. Thanks.
 

EmmJayy

2+ Year Member
Aug 9, 2014
61
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Status
Medical Student
Why is it you think tuition won't be a problem? Why do you think you'll get in state tuition everywhere?

I suggest you research into this as it is not the case. The post 9/11 gi bill will only pay up to the maximum in state (home of record) undergraduate tuition for your benefit period. It will not even scratch at the costs of medical school.

Also, there is no federal law mandating all schools grant in state tuition for vets. Many schools do this as a gratuity, most are for undergraduate programs, some for medical schools.

This is coming from a marine OIF and OEF vet with 100% service connected disability and 2 purple hearts that has already utilized the gi bill program.
 

MusicDOc124

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Oct 27, 2013
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All vets, please read - I posted this last night:

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/veterans-the-gi-bill-ch-30-and-33-and-vocational-rehabilitation-ch-31.1116928/



Also, I will be attending LECOM-B. They are very vet friendly from what I was told while I was choosing where to apply, and decided to attend.

There are a few MD schools that you will actually be very competitive for, but depends on willingness for location, but if you're set on MD, they not bad options by any means (read: if its accredited in the US - you're fine). Don't rule out DO schools. DO schools are very vet friendly across the board and more friendly toward non-trads than MD schools.

PM me if you have any questions that I can help with directly.
 

cabinbuilder

Urgent Care Physician
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Nov 21, 2005
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Yes, LECOM is very vet friendly and very inexpensive compared to other schools.
 
OP
Flippinski
Oct 7, 2014
61
8
Truckee, CA
Status
Pre-Medical
Why is it you think tuition won't be a problem? Why do you think you'll get in state tuition everywhere?

I suggest you research into this as it is not the case. The post 9/11 gi bill will only pay up to the maximum in state (home of record) undergraduate tuition for your benefit period. It will not even scratch at the costs of medical school.

Also, there is no federal law mandating all schools grant in state tuition for vets. Many schools do this as a gratuity, most are for undergraduate programs, some for medical schools.

This is coming from a marine OIF and OEF vet with 100% service connected disability and 2 purple hearts that has already utilized the gi bill program.
Check this out this explains what I am referring to. https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/08/01/va-reform-bill-congress-provides-student-vets-state-tuition

Also, many states like Illinois, Texas, New York, Massachusetts do provide free tuition to veterans in state schools. Additionally, other states offer in state tuition to veterans. There really is a whole slew of them.
 

EmmJayy

2+ Year Member
Aug 9, 2014
61
41
Status
Medical Student
Check this out this explains what I am referring to. https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/08/01/va-reform-bill-congress-provides-student-vets-state-tuition

Also, many states like Illinois, Texas, New York, Massachusetts do provide free tuition to veterans in state schools. Additionally, other states offer in state tuition to veterans. There really is a whole slew of them.
There are many institutions that do this, yes. Most of those programs also only apply to undergraduate studies when tuition is covered for veterans. Mass, New York, and other states typically only have a limited number, if any, state medical schools. Mass has only the UMass Worcester campus, which requires permanent MA residency for 5 years prior to applying. The other MA medical schools (Tufts, BU, Harvard) do not have to abide by any laws requiring public institutions to provide in state status to veterans. Additionally, as I said, the GI Bill only pays up to maximum in state undergraduate tuition, so even if you qualify for in state status at a medical school and receive the in state tuition rate (only available at public schools), a large gap will remain between GI Bill benefits paid and your medical school tuition.

I'm not trying to be negative here. I'm just giving you some insight to my experience having done this as a disabled veteran, utilized GI Bill benefits, going to medical school, etc. Voc Rehab is another option which, if approved, could cover your tuition in its entirety at certain schools since the "maximum in state undergraduate tuition" restriction does not exist within that benefit program.

Just some food for thought. From one vet to another, good luck! This whole process can be quite tedious!
 
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OP
Flippinski
Oct 7, 2014
61
8
Truckee, CA
Status
Pre-Medical
There are many institutions that do this, yes. Most of those programs also only apply to undergraduate studies when tuition is covered for veterans. Mass, New York, and other states typically only have a limited number, if any, state medical schools. Mass has only the UMass Worcester campus, which requires permanent MA residency for 5 years prior to applying. The other MA medical schools (Tufts, BU, Harvard) do not have to abide by any laws requiring public institutions to provide in state status to veterans. Additionally, as I said, the GI Bill only pays up to maximum in state undergraduate tuition, so even if you qualify for in state status at a medical school and receive the in state tuition rate (only available at public schools), a large gap will remain between GI Bill benefits paid and your medical school tuition.

I'm not trying to be negative here. I'm just giving you some insight to my experience having done this as a disabled veteran, utilized GI Bill benefits, going to medical school, etc. Voc Rehab is another option which, if approved, could cover your tuition in its entirety at certain schools since the "maximum in state undergraduate tuition" restriction does not exist within that benefit program.

Just some food for thought. From one vet to another, good luck! This whole process can be quite tedious!
Actually, ALL SCHOOLS, public or private, that want federal aid (this includes pell grants and student loans) must provide in state status to all veterans that are 3 years or less out of active duty. The law specifically states that. If the schools refuse to do so, then they will lose all their federal funding. Specifically, this wouldn't apply to me as I'm 10 years out, but it would be available to others. Also, the yellow ribbon program can significantly help out with this. Look at Stanford, THE BAH is $3100, and Stanford offers $12,000 on top of the GI Bill, so you would be looking at a little less than $33,000 in tuition being covered, so there is a remainder of $9000 for tuition, and with the yellow ribbon program the university will match the $12,000 that the government provides. so fully covered.
 

beachside

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Actually, ALL SCHOOLS, public or private, that want federal aid (this includes pell grants and student loans) must provide in state status to all veterans that are 3 years or less out of active duty. The law specifically states that. If the schools refuse to do so, then they will lose all their federal funding. Specifically, this wouldn't apply to me as I'm 10 years out, but it would be available to others. Also, the yellow ribbon program can significantly help out with this. Look at Stanford, THE BAH is $3100, and Stanford offers $12,000 on top of the GI Bill, so you would be looking at a little less than $33,000 in tuition being covered, so there is a remainder of $9000 for tuition, and with the yellow ribbon program the university will match the $12,000 that the government provides. so fully covered.
Can you cite me the law that says this? I'm only seeing a requirement for public schools to provide in-state tuition to GI bill veterans.

Edit: I read over the law in question, and it still only references public schools. I know some private schools also charge a higher out-of-state rate. I wonder what the deal is with that, if that makes them quasi "public".
 
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EmmJayy

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Can you cite me the law that says this? I'm only seeing a requirement for public schools to provide in-state tuition to GI bill veterans.

Edit: I read over the law in question, and it still only references public schools. I know some private schools also charge a higher out-of-state rate. I wonder what the deal is with that, if that makes them quasi "public".
I read the same, it references public institutions. Also, Stanford may match well with the yellow ribbon program, many schools will not offer that to graduate students though. That is one example.

I wish you the best in your path to medical school and I do hope the government pays your tuition in its entirety, Vets deserve that. I'm just saying that if you look a little deeper into the process, getting your tuition completely covered just because you are a vet is not as easy as you depict.
 
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I read the same, it references public institutions. Also, Stanford may match well with the yellow ribbon program, many schools will not offer that to graduate students though. That is one example.

I wish you the best in your path to medical school and I do hope the government pays your tuition in its entirety, Vets deserve that. I'm just saying that if you look a little deeper into the process, getting your tuition completely covered just because you are a vet is not as easy as you depict.
Totally agree. Not every institution will be able to provide a full ride, for example, Harvard, you don't get much at all, and with a $54,000 tuition bill, $2000 offered through yellow ribbon and the 20k, that leaves a huge balance...so I understand where you are coming from. But here's some other ones:

Yale: $16,171 w/match = $32,342 +20,000 = $52342 (tuition is $53,540)
Cornell: $20,000 w/match = $40,000 + 20,000 = $60,000
Drexel: Unlimited, full ride
Quinnipiac: $15,000 w/match $30,000 + 20k, $50,000

There's just a couple examples, there are some great private schools that highly participate in the yellow ribbon program. So before you commit and apply, definitely do some research as to whether the school has the yellow ribbon program and they have funding available.
 

EmmJayy

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I already utilized my post 9/11 BI Bill getting my undergraduate degree so I'm SOL, yellow ribbon or not! I am in the process of applying for voc rehab though so I am hoping they will take a chunk out for me.
 

xffan624

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I already utilized my post 9/11 BI Bill getting my undergraduate degree so I'm SOL, yellow ribbon or not! I am in the process of applying for voc rehab though so I am hoping they will take a chunk out for me.
Voc rehab will pay for tuition fully, but the living stipend is much lower for some unfathomable reason (like $500/month). If you have even 1 day left on the post 9/11, you can qualify for the 9/11 stipend for the entirety of the voc rehab program. If not, then you'll have to do the lower stipend and probably take out some loans for living expenses or pay out of your own pocket if you have outside support. Also look into the variety of scholarships available as well to help make up the shortfall (Tillman, etc)
 

EmmJayy

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Voc rehab will pay for tuition fully, but the living stipend is much lower for some unfathomable reason (like $500/month). If you have even 1 day left on the post 9/11, you can qualify for the 9/11 stipend for the entirety of the voc rehab program. If not, then you'll have to do the lower stipend and probably take out some loans for living expenses or pay out of your own pocket if you have outside support. Also look into the variety of scholarships available as well to help make up the shortfall (Tillman, etc)
I was unaware there was a BAH difference between GI Bill and voc rehab. I believe I have roughly 2 months of benefits remaining under the post 9/11 GI Bill, so I guess that is good news!

Is there a source of real information on voc rehab? It seems as if it's a secret society that only divulges information after you have been indoctrinated. Even the package I received from the VA didn't really give any quantitative benefit information.
 

xffan624

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I was unaware there was a BAH difference between GI Bill and voc rehab. I believe I have roughly 2 months of benefits remaining under the post 9/11 GI Bill, so I guess that is good news!

Is there a source of real information on voc rehab? It seems as if it's a secret society that only divulges information after you have been indoctrinated. Even the package I received from the VA didn't really give any quantitative benefit information.
Most of the info I got came from my case worker. Is there a veteran services office at your school or in your area? They should be able to help give you additional information. I think the issue is the program is extremely variable based on what your rehab track is. As far as numbers go, the program will pay what it takes to get you employed based on the plan that you formulate with your case worker. If you're doing school, though, the living expense stipend is low, so most people opt for the 9/11 stipend as it's much more reasonable to live off of.
 

MusicDOc124

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If you get approved for Voc Rehab, since you have two months left of post-9/11, make sure you actually opt for the post-9/11 stipend. It is not automatic. My case worker did it for me and informed me as we went, but it doesn't just happen. Just in case you don't have a great case worker, make sure you mention you have post-9/11 eligibility left and that you'd like that stipend!.
 
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beachside

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I'm just saying that if you look a little deeper into the process, getting your tuition completely covered just because you are a vet is not as easy as you depict.
I think you're replying to the wrong guy here, I never depicted it as "easy" to get full tuition covered by the GI bill. Quite the opposite.
 
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