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Why doctor and not nurse?

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suzie4399

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Hello all! I have an interview coming up and I'm almost 100% sure they will ask me why I want to be a doctor and not a nurse... How to you tactfully answer this? I don't want to sound negative about nursing in any way, but very sure that medicine is the path for me...
Any ideas?
 

justy_jfg

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suzie4399 said:
Hello all! I have an interview coming up and I'm almost 100% sure they will ask me why I want to be a doctor and not a nurse... How to you tactfully answer this? I don't want to sound negative about nursing in any way, but very sure that medicine is the path for me...
Any ideas?
You could try to distinguish the differences between nursing and being a doctor. Most notably, the doctor is the decision-maker and the nurse is the implementer. You could say that you are better suited to be the one in control of the situation and that you would gain more satisfaction with a job that challenges you intellectually. Nursing is a very tough job to have but with basically little decision-making as far as patient care is concerned(Except in some cases). Hope this helps a little! Good Luck!
 
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crazy_cavalier

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justy_jfg said:
You could try to distinguish the differences between nursing and being a doctor. Most notably, the doctor is the decision-maker and the nurse is the implementer. You could say that you are better suited to be the one in control of the situation and that you would gain more satisfaction with a job that challenges you intellectually. Nursing is a very tough job to have but with basically little decision-making as far as patient care is concerned(Except in some cases). Hope this helps a little! Good Luck!

By the way there are some nurse practitioners that are able to prescribe medicine and who practice medicine just like an MD. My family practice has a clinic with a lady who does this, and she makes decisions all the time as well.
 

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prestige and some cash
 

anon-y-mouse

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crazy_cavalier said:
nurse practitioners

They have NP's at my undergrad's clinic as well as MD's. the NP misdiagnosed my textbook case of pneumonia ("you have the flu." and told me to take 2 advil, rest, and drink fluids). I did so with reluctance... and I was hospitalized the next day with an extremely severe case. The MD took a look at my chart and said "what? she wrote here, 'lungs sound scratchy' and she told you to take advil??" I've heard countless stories from my friends about the other idiot nurse practitioners at health services misdiagnosing them. Perhaps those are bad apples (and I have also read stories about correspondence/electronic NP/PA schools), but I will never again trust someone with my health without 4 yeas of medical school and 2+ years of practical, 80-hour-a-week training.

anyway, to answer the original poster's question. why don't you talk about leadership? that you like to use your intellectual skills to treat people / manage health situations, etc. etc.
 
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Ross434

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suzie4399 said:
Hello all! I have an interview coming up and I'm almost 100% sure they will ask me why I want to be a doctor and not a nurse... How to you tactfully answer this? I don't want to sound negative about nursing in any way, but very sure that medicine is the path for me...
Any ideas?

Being a doctor? You dont get to deal with patients, you get to work 60 hours a week and have no free time, and you get sued! I would *definitely* pay $250,000 for this privilege.





(I'm in nursing school)
 

NunoBR

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Ross434 said:
Being a doctor? You dont get to deal with patients, you get to work 60 hours a week and have no free time, and you get sued! I would *definitely* pay $250,000 for this privilege.

(I'm in nursing school)

Do I hear a little bit of bitterness? :rolleyes:
 
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retroMD

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Ross434 said:
Being a doctor? You dont get to deal with patients, you get to work 60 hours a week and have no free time, and you get sued! I would *definitely* pay $250,000 for this privilege.


(I'm in nursing school)

wow...

NunoBR said:
Do I hear a little bit of bitterness? :rolleyes:

yeah...sounds like you are trying to talk yourelf out of becoming a doctor. (My psychology classes are starting to kick in :rolleyes: .)
 
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nightowl

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One point is that even though NPs are allowed to prescribe medicine, their training is *completely* different from medicine. I am from a family of nurses/NPs, and more emphasis is placed on the "nursing" aspect of clinical care, and lighter on the advanced science. Not to say that it's not right for some people, NPs are definitely needed, but if you want to really learn the science behind the decisions being made, I'd vote for medical school hands down.
 
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SoCuteMD

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suzie4399 said:
Hello all! I have an interview coming up and I'm almost 100% sure they will ask me why I want to be a doctor and not a nurse... How to you tactfully answer this? I don't want to sound negative about nursing in any way, but very sure that medicine is the path for me...
Any ideas?

I think for me it was autonomy (also applies to why doctor and not PA/NP). I want to spend most of my career in the States, but would like to do some extended international work, and it is much easier to do if you have an MD. In addition, I have some interest in clinical research (backed up by experience) and for this you obviously need an MD unless you want to work as a research coordinator - which I don't.

I also know that I am as smart as most doctors (smarter than some, not as smart as others) and didn't feel I would do well being looked down upon by many of them (although I would never have said this in an interview).

And to our trolling nursing student - you only have to work as many hours as you want to. You just have to find the right practice setup. I know many psychiatrists, EM docs, and pediatricians who work fewer than 40 hrs/wk and still clear over 100K/year. They aren't rolling in the dough, but 100K is enough to live quite nicely in many parts of the country. When you consider that a post-grad nursing program could cost almost 100K (at a private school, for an accelerated degree) in order to make - what? - 60K if you are lucky, then the debt/income ratio is much more favorable for physicians. Plus, with all the nurses being forced to work per diem (despite an overwhelming demand), when you account for the fact that they are left without benefits it's really not as great a deal as it used to be.
 

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suzie4399 said:
Hello all! I have an interview coming up and I'm almost 100% sure they will ask me why I want to be a doctor and not a nurse... How to you tactfully answer this? I don't want to sound negative about nursing in any way, but very sure that medicine is the path for me...
Any ideas?


Guys, you're defeating the purpose here. All she asked was a simple question; I don't think she wants to hear about a bad NP. I'm sure there are good and bad NP's as much as there are good and bad MD's, DO's, JD's, PhD's, DDS's, DMD's, etc... To answer Suzie's question, I think the best way to answer such a question is to say that your qualities are most suitable for being a doctor. You can say that you are a lifelong learner, interested in conducting your own clinical research, interested in leading surgical teams because you have the leadership potential, etc...
 
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DrKitty

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doctor = more potential for leadership, more multifaceted (research, patient care, teaching, etc)
 
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SirTony76

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I don't know many nurses that do research.

I also worked on cars with my dad pretty much my whole life. I can't describe to you how awesome the day was when I didn't just have to stand next to the tool box and hand him stuff but actually was underneath making my own decisions about what needed to be done.

TP
 
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Jaydiggity21

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socuteMD said:
I think for me it was autonomy (also applies to why doctor and not PA/NP). I want to spend most of my career in the States, but would like to do some extended international work, and it is much easier to do if you have an MD. In addition, I have some interest in clinical research (backed up by experience) and for this you obviously need an MD unless you want to work as a research coordinator - which I don't.

I also know that I am as smart as most doctors (smarter than some, not as smart as others) and didn't feel I would do well being looked down upon by many of them (although I would never have said this in an interview).

And to our trolling nursing student - you only have to work as many hours as you want to. You just have to find the right practice setup. I know many psychiatrists, EM docs, and pediatricians who work fewer than 40 hrs/wk and still clear over 100K/year. They aren't rolling in the dough, but 100K is enough to live quite nicely in many parts of the country. When you consider that a post-grad nursing program could cost almost 100K (at a private school, for an accelerated degree) in order to make - what? - 60K if you are lucky, then the debt/income ratio is much more favorable for physicians. Plus, with all the nurses being forced to work per diem (despite an overwhelming demand), when you account for the fact that they are left without benefits it's really not as great a deal as it used to be.
This is so not true, and im not an advocate for nursing school because I am going to med school...its just that my mom is a nurse and has been for awhile with only a 2 year degree (which cost less than 10K) and she makes upwards of 90K+/year, and she works either 3 or 4 12's per week...so yeah, nurses make a lot of money, they just dont have the autonomy that doctors have
 

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DrKitty said:
doctor = more potential for leadership, more multifaceted (research, patient care, teaching, etc)

I wouldn't go with "more potential for leadership." Who runs the operation day to day? The charge nurse. Who rides herd on the crowds of specialists and allied health professionals clogging up a case? The nurse manager. And so on.

The second angle is good. In my interviews I talked about the trinity -- patient care, science, and teaching -- and my experience and enjoyment in them.
 
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45408

uh, you could make $60K in your first year as a nurse. My fiance works part-time and attends school full-time, and she makes more money as an RN than either of her roommates working full-time as teachers.

Anyways, I would stress the increased options for an MD to do research, do surgery, work more in diagnosis, etc.
 

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rsfarrell said:
I wouldn't go with "more potential for leadership." Who runs the operation day to day? The charge nurse. Who rides herd on the crowds of specialists and allied health professionals clogging up a case? The nurse manager. And so on.

The second angle is good. In my interviews I talked about the trinity -- patient care, science, and teaching -- and my experience and enjoyment in them.


He isn’t talking about leadership in the fashion you are talking about. It is intellectual leadership that he is talking about. Leadership within the realms of patient care. Not Who tells which nurse to see which patient or when they can take break ETC...

Who decides which chemo regimen is best for a certain patient? The Doctor.
 

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You have to remember, though, that salary is influenced by the area you're working in. If you're living in an area with a high cost of living, you usually make more.
 

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I had to answer that question. I felt there was more to know, the reason for renal failure and how to treat it was what intrigued me. I understood the basic treatment algorithm but I wanted to know why it happened and the mechanics ion the body that cased or compensated for the disease.

This is a paraphrase of my answer since I was frakin nervous during the interview but that is the basic idea.


Nursing has a lot of positives but if you wanted to know the how’s and whys med school is a must.


Good luck
 

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suzie4399 said:
Hello all! I have an interview coming up and I'm almost 100% sure they will ask me why I want to be a doctor and not a nurse... How to you tactfully answer this? I don't want to sound negative about nursing in any way, but very sure that medicine is the path for me...
Any ideas?

Politically correct answer, Leadership, more autonomy, many different fields of medicine to practice.

Real answer: The almighty dollar.
 

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usnavdoc said:
He isn’t talking about leadership in the fashion you are talking about. It is intellectual leadership that he is talking about. Leadership within the realms of patient care.

When you're in a hole, quit digging. "Intellectual leadership," gawd. Talk about your classic "MDeity" comments.

Who decides which chemo regimen is best for a certain patient? The Doctor.

Two things:

1. In the real world, the chemo regimen may be discussed by some or all of the following: the oncologist, the PCP, the intensivist, the nutritionist, the patient, the family, the nurses, the ethics committee, the hospice staff, etc. If you think that "the Doctor" decides and the rest of us scurry around to do His bidding, you're living in a dream world.

2. When writing your personal statement, try not to capitialize "doctor."
 

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SirTony76 said:
I don't know many nurses that do research.

This is certainly a safe approach -- pick a function that nurses do not do, and say that is where your interests lie. Research, radiology, pathology, etc.
Certainly some mention of autonomy doesn't hurt. But whatever you say, you need to suggest you want to be a doctor without bashing nurses. Because that is the real crux of the question -- i.e. do you feal being a nurse is beneath you.
 
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Beau Geste

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SirTony76 said:
I don't know many nurses that do research.
TP

There are Ph.D. programs for nursing. Look at faculty members in those programs and see the long list of publications. There are plenty of nurses doing nursing research.

If you really want to know the difference, visit the American Nurses Association and the American Medical Association websites and read their scopes of practice. If you can't find them there, just do a general search (you get the idea). Read the different scopes and try to find how the service delivery models are set up for both physician and nurse and determine YOUR answer for why you want to be a physician instead of a nurse.

People can throw answers at you and bicker all day long, but you'll come off better by doing a little research and coming up with your own reason. You might even impress your interviewers by doing research on your own about it.

Good luck.
 

usnavdoc

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rsfarrell said:
When you're in a hole, quit digging. "Intellectual leadership," gawd. Talk about your classic "MDeity" comments.



Two things:

1. In the real world, the chemo regimen may be discussed by some or all of the following: the oncologist, the PCP, the intensivist, the nutritionist, the patient, the family, the nurses, the ethics committee, the hospice staff, etc. If you think that "the Doctor" decides and the rest of us scurry around to do His bidding, you're living in a dream world.

2. When writing your personal statement, try not to capitialize "doctor."

In a hole. Wow. Im not in the hole. first I was not being antagonistic with my response.

Im just stating things how they are. The doctor being the the oncologist, the PCP, the intensivist as you mention as well as perhaps surgery, rad onc. and path. Do guide by intellectual leadership. Tumor Board(or whatever they are called at your university hospital) is held each week where things are discussed from the variety of specialists involved. Is it the patients choice? of course. Does the nutritionist and pharmacist contribute. yes. I have never seen a chemo regimine go before a panel of nurses or an ethics committee. But the end result is the patient being given a reccomendation by the physician. Not the ancillary staff at a hospital. Thereby that is leadership with in the realms of patient care.

How is that difficult to understand. Its just one example of where physicians take that role. What may I ask is your experience as a physician or medical student?


And BTW I dont need to write personal statements any longer. I come on this forum to help others as I wish there had been someone to help me when I was in undergrad.

Trying to correct someone's gramar on a forum? thats funny.

All in all my previous response to the OP is that if someone asks you why not another career in medicine(be it nurse or pharmacist ETC...) You have to state the strengths of that field and how you see that in your future. Same can be said if you were trying to get into dental school.
 

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To the OP: first of all, you don't say why you think this question might come up - but assuming it does, megboo's suggestion about knowing the *actual* differences between medicine and nursing is the one thing from this thread that makes sense to me. (I'm a former RN now MD.) Don't go by the anecdotes or popular perceptions of what nurses do - and in particular don't say things that sound elitist or put-down about the nurse's job. If you aren't thoroughly familiar with the possibilities of what nurses can do (btw, guys, there are lots of nurses doing research although it's not usually basic science bench stuff), then don't do a compare-and-contrast thing "I want to be a doctor because nurses do/don't ..... and doctors do." Just say, "I see myself as a doctor because... "
 
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johnthestreak

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suzie4399 said:
Hello all! I have an interview coming up and I'm almost 100% sure they will ask me why I want to be a doctor and not a nurse... How to you tactfully answer this? I don't want to sound negative about nursing in any way, but very sure that medicine is the path for me...
Any ideas?



so you don't have to change bedpans
 

SirTony76

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Megboo said:
There are Ph.D. programs for nursing. Look at faculty members in those programs and see the long list of publications. There are plenty of nurses doing nursing research.

If you really want to know the difference, visit the American Nurses Association and the American Medical Association websites and read their scopes of practice. If you can't find them there, just do a general search (you get the idea). Read the different scopes and try to find how the service delivery models are set up for both physician and nurse and determine YOUR answer for why you want to be a physician instead of a nurse.

People can throw answers at you and bicker all day long, but you'll come off better by doing a little research and coming up with your own reason. You might even impress your interviewers by doing research on your own about it.

Good luck.


What's wrong with the rest of my reason?
 

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CTSballer11 said:
Real answer: The almighty dollar.
Some of these posters really need to do some more homework before answering. Many nurses that I work with make MORE than the physicians I work with. Travellers can pull in $160K per year WITHOUT all that pesky med school debt.

I think the important way to answer this question is HONESTLY. If you don't have an answer, and have to come to SDN to find one, I would be concerned that you haven't really thought about your motivations yet. Why do YOU (not other SDNers) want to become a physician instead of a nurse? Do you have enough experience to know the different roles these two important people play in the real world?
 

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suzie4399 said:
Hello all! I have an interview coming up and I'm almost 100% sure they will ask me why I want to be a doctor and not a nurse... How to you tactfully answer this? I don't want to sound negative about nursing in any way, but very sure that medicine is the path for me...
Any ideas?


I am a nurse, and will be starting medical school in august... I was asked this question 3 of my interviews...This was my response:

I truly enjoyed nursing. It has provided me with a basic background in providing care for others, while helping me expand my communication skills. I learned about the importance of honest, yet empathic interaction with others. I have also learned to communicate efficiently by asking open ended questions and implementing great listening skills. NOW, I wished to EXPAND on this background... Nursing does not allow me to satisfy my desire to fully understand and incorporate into my practice, the pharmacological and surgical aspects patient care. I hoped to further hone my critical thinking skills through medicine, while continuing to utilize the qualities I learned through nursing.
 
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Beau Geste

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SirTony76 said:
What's wrong with the rest of my reason?

I didn't know it was a reason. Sounded like an anecdote.

I was responding to your statement about nurses and research.
 

SirTony76

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Megboo said:
I didn't know it was a reason. Sounded like an anecdote.

I was responding to your statement about nurses and research.

Think about it carefully...
 

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Megboo--LOVE the avatar!

When I decided to pursue medicine, I came home and told my husband I wanted to be a nurse. He laughed at me and said "Oh honey, you are soooo bad at taking orders from people but so good at giving them. You should become a doctor." I think he meant it to be nice.
 

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Flopotomist said:
Some of these posters really need to do some more homework before answering. Many nurses that I work with make MORE than the physicians I work with. Travellers can pull in $160K per year WITHOUT all that pesky med school debt.

I think the important way to answer this question is HONESTLY. If you don't have an answer, and have to come to SDN to find one, I would be concerned that you haven't really thought about your motivations yet. Why do YOU (not other SDNers) want to become a physician instead of a nurse? Do you have enough experience to know the different roles these two important people play in the real world?

I did not know that this was possible. I have trouble believing this, but I will take your word for it. Obviously, you cannot go into medicine soley for the money. You have to enjoy taking care and healing the sick, or you will be miserable.
 

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usnavdoc said:
In a hole. Wow. Im not in the hole. first I was not being antagonistic with my response.

The adage does not imply antagonism, it refers to people's foolish predilection for worsening a bad situation.

Im just stating things how they are. The doctor being the the oncologist, the PCP, the intensivist as you mention as well as perhaps surgery, rad onc. and path. Do guide by intellectual leadership.

Wow, stunningly incompetent writing. That certainly puts me in my place.

Tumor Board(or whatever they are called at your university hospital) is held each week where things are discussed from the variety of specialists involved. Is it the patients choice? of course. Does the nutritionist and pharmacist contribute. yes. I have never seen a chemo regimine go before a panel of nurses or an ethics committee. But the end result is the patient being given a reccomendation by the physician. Not the ancillary staff at a hospital. Thereby that is leadership with in the realms of patient care.

Being the person who makes the recommendation that a bunch of people have contributed to is no more "leadership" than telling nurses when they can take their breaks. Less, actually.

What may I ask is your experience as a physician or medical student?

I'm a paramedic who has worked both in hospitals and in the field.

Trying to correct someone's gramar on a forum? thats funny.

I only mention it because that particular grammatical mistake (“the Doctor”) seems to dovetail with your mistaken ideas of physician grandiosity.
 

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I would rather tell someone to pick up a patient's fecal matter than pick it up myself.
 

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christinejane19 said:
I am a nurse, and will be starting medical school in august... I was asked this question 3 of my interviews...This was my response:

I truly enjoyed nursing. It has provided me with a basic background in providing care for others, while helping me expand my communication skills. I learned about the importance of honest, yet empathic interaction with others. I have also learned to communicate efficiently by asking open ended questions and implementing great listening skills. NOW, I wished to EXPAND on this background... Nursing does not allow me to satisfy my desire to fully understand and incorporate into my practice, the pharmacological and surgical aspects patient care. I hoped to further hone my critical thinking skills through medicine, while continuing to utilize the qualities I learned through nursing.

:thumbup: :love:
 
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SirTony76

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Megboo said:
No.

I was responding to the nurses and research statement.

Get over it.

Chill out buddy, I wanted some feedback on the rest of it. If you don't understand it, you don't understand it. No need to get all grouchy.
 

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QuikClot said:
The adage does not imply antagonism, it refers to people's foolish predilection for worsening a bad situation.



Wow, stunningly incompetent writing. That certainly puts me in my place.



Being the person who makes the recommendation that a bunch of people have contributed to is no more "leadership" than telling nurses when they can take their breaks. Less, actually.



I'm a paramedic who has worked both in hospitals and in the field.



I only mention it because that particular grammatical mistake (“the Doctor”) seems to dovetail with your mistaken ideas of physician grandiosity.

Incompetent writing? Right. How original. This is a forum not a term paper.

The point is not to put you in your place. To do that I would first have to give a **** about what a paramedic thinks about anything I have to say since you know nothing about what physician training and practice involves.

This was an answer to a question posed on this forum by someone desiring to become a physician. Plain and simple.

“Less leadership than telling someone when to take break?” Sure keep thinking that. You obviously have no idea or experience in these matters.

Why are you even responding to a post by someone who desires to go to medical school?

I have no ideas of physician grandiosity. I believe in a team approach to health care. That is the best approach in and out of the field or hospital. Mutual respect. But every team has a leader. And that happens to be the role of a Doctor. You however obviously have an inferiority complex about your chosen profession (Paramedic. See I capitalized it just for you.) and feel the need to turn this into a fight. Well I’m not biting. I’ve said my piece. There is no longer a point to this thread b/c there has been plenty of good advice from several people on how to deal with this or similar interview questions.
 

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nightowl said:
One point is that even though NPs are allowed to prescribe medicine, their training is *completely* different from medicine. I am from a family of nurses/NPs, and more emphasis is placed on the "nursing" aspect of clinical care, and lighter on the advanced science. Not to say that it's not right for some people, NPs are definitely needed, but if you want to really learn the science behind the decisions being made, I'd vote for medical school hands down.

At GW the NP students are in the same exact classes as the PA and MD students... programs differ in their quality, I guess.
 

freddydpt

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suzie4399 said:
Hello all! I have an interview coming up and I'm almost 100% sure they will ask me why I want to be a doctor and not a nurse... How to you tactfully answer this? I don't want to sound negative about nursing in any way, but very sure that medicine is the path for me...
Any ideas?

I sometimes like to ask this question of med student during interviews, so it's definitely a good one to think about. Basically, I try to get at how tactful someone can be and how true to themselves they are being about becoming a doctor. How much exploration of other professions have they done before completely "ruling out" everything else, while "ruling in" medicine. Avoid the words... "not as good" "not as educated" "less leadership role" - all of those things are individual in nature, not profession.

I, myself, was a PT who went to medical school. The ONLY answer that is completely valid 100% of the time, without insulting a profession is to analyze the day to day tasks of the job... not the profession, but the JOB. What will you be doing that a PA or NP cannot - and saying diagnosing and prescribing medications is NOT a valid answer because they do that... and most do it well. It might be about practice priviledges, but make sure you know what you're talking about before you start to compare.

So my advice would be to call up a PA and an NP and find out what those tasks are that make their days different than the MD's. Who has final responsibility? It might differ by setting. Who does the physical exam? Again, based on the setting a PA might do the whole thing, or only do parts.

Ultimately, I chose medicine over PT because of the following reasons: 1) I didn't enjoy transferring patients or walking with them. I saw the bigger picture and understood the value, but it wasn't what I enjoyed doing. 2) I wanted a greater scope of practice and to understand more completely each lab value, diagnosis, drug and whatever else I saw in the chart. As a PT my education was limited in that sense.
 
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CruiseLover

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In the midwest, nurse anesthesists are making $150,000. Malpractice is cheaper than a doctor because the doctor "supervises" them. If interested in anesthesia, it might work for someone. As I was chatting with some physicians where I work, they thought I would do much better going this route. But it's medicine all the way for me. :)

And NPs in my area of the country make approximately $72000. The
NP in my gyn office is wonderful and I see her all the time. Her theory is education and treatment for "healthy" women - Paps, birth control, STDs, normal prenatal care, etc. But when a woman has an issue such as ovarian cyst, HGSIL pap, PIH - then it's off to the doctor for treatment, surgery, etc.

As a physician I see NPs as a boost to my practice. They are giving "well care", getting reimbursed the same as I do and I have to pay them a lot less. It saves my time to treat the sick patient and do more office procedures (which is reimbursed much better). I wouldn't be so harsh to judge NPs. A good one is worth her weight in gold to a physican practice.
 

QuikClot

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usnavdoc said:
The point is not to put you in your place. To do that I would first have to give a **** about what a paramedic thinks about anything I have to say . . .

I don't like to toot my own horn, but I certainly had you pegged. "MDeity" all the way. :laugh:

Avoid the words... "not as good" "not as educated" "less leadership role" - all of those things are individual in nature, not profession.

:thumbup:
 

DoctorPardi

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BradenDO said:
You have to remember, though, that salary is influenced by the area you're working in. If you're living in an area with a high cost of living, you usually make more.

I live in Alabama, a state not very well noted for it's high cost of living. Nurses here start off making around 22-25 dollars an hour with a two year RN degree from a community college. If they wanted too they could work like 2 12's on the weekends and 5 8's during the week and be making more money than a first year med student could hope to see for 8 years or more.

All that being said, the nurses I work with don't do much decision making at all, for the most part they know their jobs like a normal employee of any other job might. If you asked them where X instrument was they could tell you. If you asked them what exactly a specific surgery was they often say "oh that's on the leg".

So I'm not bashing nurses by any means but if you're going into medicine to really feel good about helping people everyday then I think medical school is the better choice. You make the final decisions about a patient's care and you'll get the full personal reward for a truly "helped" patient. Of course, there is a chance (depending on the speciality how much) that a patient of yours could die because of your choice or be worse off. So you have to be confident in your abilities and know that you have the type of personality that is 100% dead set on doing the best thing for the patient and also that the reward from helping people on that level is truly what you want to do for the rest of your life.
 

Beau Geste

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SirTony76 said:
Chill out buddy, I wanted some feedback on the rest of it. If you don't understand it, you don't understand it. No need to get all grouchy.

I didn't appreciate your sass in the "think about it carefully...." snip. I'm not an idiot, I just chose to address a particular topic in your thread. I'm not even sure what you want me to tell you about your story. You already know why you want to be a doctor, so why should I comment about that? :confused:

:rolleyes:

Gdbaby-

Yeah, Cash rules!
 

SirTony76

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megboo said:
I didn't appreciate your sass in the "think about it carefully...." snip. I'm not an idiot, I just chose to address a particular topic in your thread. I'm not even sure what you want me to tell you about your story. You already know why you want to be a doctor, so why should I comment about that? :confused:

:rolleyes:

Gdbaby-

Yeah, Cash rules!

I'll kiss it and make it all better later... :laugh:
 

AquaticSunrise13

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I sometimes like to ask this question of med student during interviews, so it's definitely a good one to think about. Basically, I try to get at how tactful someone can be and how true to themselves they are being about becoming a doctor. How much exploration of other professions have they done before completely "ruling out" everything else, while "ruling in" medicine. Avoid the words... "not as good" "not as educated" "less leadership role" - all of those things are individual in nature, not profession.

I, myself, was a PT who went to medical school. The ONLY answer that is completely valid 100% of the time, without insulting a profession is to analyze the day to day tasks of the job... not the profession, but the JOB. What will you be doing that a PA or NP cannot - and saying diagnosing and prescribing medications is NOT a valid answer because they do that... and most do it well. It might be about practice priviledges, but make sure you know what you're talking about before you start to compare.

So my advice would be to call up a PA and an NP and find out what those tasks are that make their days different than the MD's. Who has final responsibility? It might differ by setting. Who does the physical exam? Again, based on the setting a PA might do the whole thing, or only do parts.

Ultimately, I chose medicine over PT because of the following reasons: 1) I didn't enjoy transferring patients or walking with them. I saw the bigger picture and understood the value, but it wasn't what I enjoyed doing. 2) I wanted a greater scope of practice and to understand more completely each lab value, diagnosis, drug and whatever else I saw in the chart. As a PT my education was limited in that sense.

Hey Freddy I know this is a very old post, but I have a question for you. Does this advice also apply if you plan on addressing in your PS that you in fact shadowed/talked with people in other professions, namely nursing? For instance the reasons you listed as THE ONLY answer that's completely valid, would you talk about it the same way in your PS? Thank you and I hope to hear from you soon as I'm finalizing my personal statement.
 
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