physicslover

7+ Year Member
Dec 20, 2009
336
0
Status
Pre-Optometry
hi

would working in a position of power in an opthalmic office where you schdule people, get trained on equipment, manage ppl be good experience for optometry school?

Im conflicted because the place i may be working at is apparently very difficult to work at with horrible employers, who over use their employees and drama. It is also very far away. I think it would be good experience but I don't know if the stress would take away from the learning aspect. Or I could just take another job and focus more on shadowing?

Any suggestions?
 

quackquack

Waterloo Optometry 2015
7+ Year Member
Jul 11, 2009
196
2
Ontario
Status
Optometry Student
Well here's my two cents:

If you already have shadowing, then this is something "new" so it'll help! I mean how much shadowing can you really get until it all becomes the same old. This is actually useful experience. I know an ophthalmic office is not the same as an optometric office but, at least you may use similar equipment. But either way I don't think it will _hurt_. Plus a job is a job! And also if it's "stressed" like you said, maybe you can use that situation as at a time you dealt with stress (and how you overcame it). Shows your problem solving skills as a person.

Good luck!
 

KHE

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 14, 2005
3,336
328
Status
Optometrist
hi

would working in a position of power in an opthalmic office where you schdule people, get trained on equipment, manage ppl be good experience for optometry school?

Im conflicted because the place i may be working at is apparently very difficult to work at with horrible employers, who over use their employees and drama. It is also very far away. I think it would be good experience but I don't know if the stress would take away from the learning aspect. Or I could just take another job and focus more on shadowing?

Any suggestions?
I would take the job. Shadowing is one thing but you can easily zone out while shadowing. Actually being responsible for the smooth running of an office is a valuable experience. Even if it turns out to be the worst job in history and it just might, then you will have taken away from it an idea of what does NOT work you in terms of your future career. Sometimes learning what does not work is just as valuable if not more valuable than learning what does work.
 
Jul 6, 2010
116
0
Status
Optometry Student
Take it.

From my experience of working as an ophthalmic assistant, you will learn A LOT, and many things that you would not learn from shadowing. Being able to use all the equipment looks amazing on the application and you also learn soo much about how the eye works that you wouldn't learn elsewhere. It is also soo neat to be able to recognize diseases and disorders by yourself by using the machines. I definitely think my experience boosted my application, good luck!
 

KHE

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 14, 2005
3,336
328
Status
Optometrist
Take it.

From my experience of working as an ophthalmic assistant, you will learn A LOT, and many things that you would not learn from shadowing. Being able to use all the equipment looks amazing on the application and you also learn soo much about how the eye works that you wouldn't learn elsewhere. It is also soo neat to be able to recognize diseases and disorders by yourself by using the machines. I definitely think my experience boosted my application, good luck!
That's all fine and dandy but that would not be a reason I would take the job. Knowing how to run an OCT or an autorefractor isn't going to help you in school or in your career because you can learn those things in about 6 seconds anyways. I mean it's not harmful but it's of no particular benefit.

The main benefit is going to be in seeing and being integrated into the business aspect of a medical practice. Dealing with complaining patients, scheduling issues, pain in the butt staffers, drug reps, INSURANCE COMPANIES etc. etc.

All of that will give you a much broader set of view points from which to view your own career and having a frame of reference for understanding what works for you personally and what doesn't.
 
Oct 26, 2010
3
0
Status
Pre-Optometry
That's all fine and dandy but that would not be a reason I would take the job. Knowing how to run an OCT or an autorefractor isn't going to help you in school or in your career because you can learn those things in about 6 seconds anyways. I mean it's not harmful but it's of no particular benefit.

The main benefit is going to be in seeing and being integrated into the business aspect of a medical practice. Dealing with complaining patients, scheduling issues, pain in the butt staffers, drug reps, INSURANCE COMPANIES etc. etc.

All of that will give you a much broader set of view points from which to view your own career and having a frame of reference for understanding what works for you personally and what doesn't.
I completely agree with this. I am the manager in my office but I still tech and work up patients because it's a smaller office with a total of 3 employees, including myself. I don't think I would have been exposed to as much if I shadowed an OD. Complaining patients, insurances, and staffing play a huge part in a practice and unfortunately you don't see that if you shadow an OD. When you shadow an OD, you're there a few hours and leave. Knowing how to deal with all that comes with a position in an OMD or OD's office. It will help you in the future when you open up your practice. I say take the job; it will show that you are serious about the profession.
 
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physicslover

7+ Year Member
Dec 20, 2009
336
0
Status
Pre-Optometry
thanks for the advice guys.
i guess i was just scared to take the position because it was something i did not feel prepared for at all. no opth exp! and now i need to be a manager?! I heard that this office is known for a very high turnover of employees and they basically just chuck/abuse them.

It is still a great learning experience as I will be thrust into this new world of both managing and opt stuff.

the one thing that bothers me about a lot of these places is that the doctor is treated like a god. the employees were tiptoing around them and basically had to change the whole day schedule if they were in a bad mood. I know this is something that occurs frequently and I need to learn to get over this, but it pains me to kiss up to someone like that. I very much hate kissing ass and will have to learn to tolerate this.


Here are some of my responsbilities:
- managing 20 opth techs
- scheudling doctors/ophs
- biweekly meetings
- training ppl on equipment
-ordering supplies
- working with other managers
- helping out with opth equipment
- working to doctor's needs
- dealing with angry customers


It seems overwhelming but is not that bad. Here's my main issue that I'm sure many of you have had to deal with so if you can give me some advice that'd be great.

I'm a young person and will be managing old people who are doctors and in positions higher than me- how would you command respect and deal with difficult employees?

Plus do you find it sketch that they hire me with no experience..? Wouldn't this type of position require some type of oph experience. Please shoot out any advice on helping me with this position. Very nervous!
 

KHE

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 14, 2005
3,336
328
Status
Optometrist
thanks for the advice guys.
i guess i was just scared to take the position because it was something i did not feel prepared for at all. no opth exp! and now i need to be a manager?! I heard that this office is known for a very high turnover of employees and they basically just chuck/abuse them.

It is still a great learning experience as I will be thrust into this new world of both managing and opt stuff.

the one thing that bothers me about a lot of these places is that the doctor is treated like a god. the employees were tiptoing around them and basically had to change the whole day schedule if they were in a bad mood. I know this is something that occurs frequently and I need to learn to get over this, but it pains me to kiss up to someone like that. I very much hate kissing ass and will have to learn to tolerate this.


Here are some of my responsbilities:
- managing 20 opth techs
- scheudling doctors/ophs
- biweekly meetings
- training ppl on equipment
-ordering supplies
- working with other managers
- helping out with opth equipment
- working to doctor's needs
- dealing with angry customers


It seems overwhelming but is not that bad. Here's my main issue that I'm sure many of you have had to deal with so if you can give me some advice that'd be great.

I'm a young person and will be managing old people who are doctors and in positions higher than me- how would you command respect and deal with difficult employees?

Plus do you find it sketch that they hire me with no experience..? Wouldn't this type of position require some type of oph experience. Please shoot out any advice on helping me with this position. Very nervous!
Wow. You're going to get roasted. lol.

How are you supposed to train people on equipment if you don't know how to use it yourself? It's going to be pretty tough to supervise people who are going to have to train you initially.

I think there are two ways of approaching this....

The first is you can say that you're probably not qualified for the job and decline it or ask to not have supervisory functions.

The second is to go into it knowing full well that you've been set up for failure and that you'll probably end up being fired and just use your time there, however brief as an opportunity to see how not to run a practice. But even then, the worst office out there in terms of turnover and frustration will have at least one or two redeeming qualities about it that will make you think "hmmm....these guys are idiots but I like the way they handle X, Y, or Z."

When you graduate, you'll still be a young person I'm assuming so the issue of managing staff or commanding respect from people older than you whether it's patients or other doctors or whatever is still going to be there. Here's a chance to practice that on someone else's dime.

Good luck. lol. It sounds like you're being set up a little bit but I would still do it. Plus, it's good to be fired. Everyone should be fired at least once in their life.
 

quackquack

Waterloo Optometry 2015
7+ Year Member
Jul 11, 2009
196
2
Ontario
Status
Optometry Student
Maybe they're hiring someone with no experience because even those with experience are leaving that job... thus they have no choice... lots of stress maybe. I would still do it. However bad it's going to be, you'll still be seeing lots, learning lots, and you get paid.

When I worked for a doctor, it was unpaid internship for my whole summer. Full time. It was a lot of time I gave up just to see/learn things, and NOT get paid. So you getting paid at least = extra awesome.

As for old people, they're always going to be angry or frustrated about something, but that could be said for anyone i guess. People always like to take things out on health care providers. They like to yell at you for anything... too crowded, too long of a wait, why are you asking so many questions for medical histories, you speak too soft/loud, can't remember their PIN number and blame you for getting the new credit card swiper thing... I'll give you the advice that my optometrist gave me: Sometimes you just have to take it.
 
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physicslover

7+ Year Member
Dec 20, 2009
336
0
Status
Pre-Optometry
As an optometry hopeful, I know this job is valuable experience. As a realist, I don't want to get fired in three months and have to start this horrible job hunt again, not to the avail of the accruing interest on my student loans.

If I were rich and money was not a concern, I would go for this experience without a blink of an eye. I could sense their was a lot of internal drama going on with a lot of difficult staff, which is why they were even considering hiring me. I don't have a problem with that but with a position like this, I require extensive training to feel confident.

Quackquack, I was actually refering to managing employees older than me but what you said is true too. But I am much more confer table dealing with yelling patients/customers than employees.