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I'm looking at potential pharmacy schools to apply to in the northeast. Any experiences with schools to avoid?
 
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Jibby321

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Word on the street is that LECOM is pretty terrible.
 
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trailerpark

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yeah, only go to lecom if getting your pharmD in the quickest amount of time for the lowest amount in student loans is most important to you
 
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trailerpark

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I'm curious what others think are the worst schools in the North East, MCPHS Worchester?
 

BenJammin

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I don't judge schools by GPA, PCAT, or anything like that. Ask their recent graduates how job hunting is going and whether or not they're getting jobs in their desired areas. My alma mater has been at the bottom of the USNWW rankings for awhile yet their grads get positions in big cities where there is a surplus.
 
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  1. Lou Coronel got kicked out for being a liar; Lied on her resume, lied to other SUCOP faculties, Lied to the profession. Will see who would hire this person again, because Once a Liar, Always a Liar!
  2. The Founding "Hiccup, womanizer" Hieu T, Dean got eliminated, escorted out of the building by security officers. "Rumor" among the pharmacist' community in OC said he was cheated with one of the student's mother in the class of 2015 in Orange County, CA. No Wonder why SUCOP had lost all of the rotation sites in California due to this unethical Founding Dean's cheating fairs. Yet, His marriage was also in trouble due to this facts and the records at Kentucky Court of Justice - Family Court Division shown similar name along with his legally "old & ugly" spouse had filed a divorce at the court docket. Bravo to this corruption, unfaithful, deceitful Founding Dean of SUCOP.
  3. Also couple more faculties were fired.
  4. Then the new Dean had taken over the spot.
  5. That's the end of this Era.
 
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  1. Lou Coronel got kicked out for being a liar; Lied on her resume, lied to other SUCOP faculties, Lied to the profession. Will see who would hire this person again, because Once a Liar, Always a Liar!
  2. The Founding "Hiccup, womanizer" Hieu T, Dean got eliminated, escorted out of the building by security officers. "Rumor" among the pharmacist' community in OC said he was cheated with one of the student's mother in the class of 2015 in Orange County, CA. No Wonder why SUCOP had lost all of the rotation sites in California due to this unethical Founding Dean's cheating fairs. Yet, His marriage was also in trouble due to this facts and the records at Kentucky Court of Justice - Family Court Division shown similar name along with his legally "old & ugly" spouse had filed a divorce at the court docket. Bravo to this corruption, unfaithful, deceitful Founding Dean of SUCOP.
  3. Also couple more faculties were fired.
  4. Then the new Dean had taken over the spot.
  5. That's the end of this Era.

“Kicked out for being a liar” is an understatement. This person was a real fraud/con-artist. She had documented and signed on numerous items of having qualifications as a PhD in Pathology, MS in Diabetes Management, and a licensed practicing MD within the state of Kentucky, which was all eventually discovered to be false. Therefore this person was actually committing fraud, which is serious and disastrous due to the level of her position and delegated duties she was entrusted with at the college.

Yet unfortunately, despite the clear evidence against her and or her lack of legitimate verification of credentials, the scam didn't end there. The interim dean at the time and his newly appointed clinical department chair outright lied to the students and young faculty by essentially informing them there was zero concern about the person’s professional qualifications. Wally also had the gall to threaten expulsion or dismissal of anyone caught asking or discussing further about the matter. Eventually, months later the person directly in question was required to leave by people of higher or real authority. Surprisingly her two co-perpetrators/accomplices, which obviously should not be trusted in academia, are still there working for the school. Whenever asked by alumni about what happened, the two loyal co-perpetrators answer with "oh she retired", which of course is another lie. Therefore be careful about where you decide to invest your time and money.
 
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Sadly, many of these Pharm programs are full of trash. Best option is to go for a Christian affiliated or faith-based pharmacy school.
 
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dnye1255

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Why is lecom bad btw?


People on SDN like to bitch and complain about their dress code and no food/drink in class rules. If you can't put up with a few rules then you're defiantly not prepared for the work force. I'd be willing to put up with a crappy administration if it meant that I'd graduate a year sooner and have 30K less in student debt than my peers.
 
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LECOM get a lot of hate because it is the face of diploma mill colleges. Once you enter any of their campuses, you will quickly notice the blatant for-profit environment.
If analysts predict a potential growth in the need for people with janitorial degrees, you can bet that LECOM will announce a new Doctor of Janitorial Services 3 days later.
 
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Amicable Angora

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Perhaps the best way to decide which program is right for you is to be proactive and investigate for yourself about your prospective pharmacy schools. Websites like this (SDN) are actually good places to find out what possible problems exist in a particular program. Additionally, try to find out information from current students or ones that very recently attended the school. Ask the pharmacists that you work under. Note and list your concerns and actually call the school up to ask questions. Honestly if you are a minority, definitely do your homework about a school. It's better to avoid the schools that don't have many minorities as faculty. If you want an easy convenient streamlined education, go to a for-profit pharmacy school. If you don't know what "for-profit schools" are, or how they differ from "non-profit schools", you definitely should read up and find out what they are. "For-profit schools" are not real scholarly institutions and don't be fooled by the term "Private" school. They are nothing like the traditional private colleges and private universities.

Your reply has nothing to do with what I wrote
 

pharmgirl2322

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Hell no. I would never go to that overpriced sh't hole. They don't even have a staffed cafeteria just a room where you can eat food. They target wealthy NYC's who are too stupid to get into local schools.

I have to be honest- the cafeteria played an important role in where I went to pharmacy school too. I get it. Where did you go to pharmacy school?
 

xyz8888

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“Kicked out for being a liar” is an understatement. This person was a real fraud/con-artist. She had documented and signed on numerous items of having qualifications as a PhD in Pathology, MS in Diabetes Management, and a licensed practicing MD within the state of Kentucky, which was all eventually discovered to be false. Therefore this person was actually committing fraud, which is serious and disastrous due to the level of her position and delegated duties she was entrusted with at the college.

Yet unfortunately, despite the clear evidence against her and or her lack of legitimate verification of credentials, the scam didn't end there. The interim dean at the time and his newly appointed clinical department chair outright lied to the students and young faculty by essentially informing them there was zero concern about the person’s professional qualifications. Wally also had the gall to threaten expulsion or dismissal of anyone caught asking or discussing further about the matter. Eventually, months later the person directly in question was required to leave by people of higher or real authority. Surprisingly her two co-perpetrators/accomplices, which obviously should not be trusted in academia, are still there working for the school. Whenever asked by alumni about what happened, the two loyal co-perpetrators answer with "oh she retired", which of course is another lie. Therefore be careful about where you decide to invest your time and money.

The integrity of the degree at this school is being compromised.
 

xyz8888

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“Kicked out for being a liar” is an understatement. This person was a real fraud/con-artist. She had documented and signed on numerous items of having qualifications as a PhD in Pathology, MS in Diabetes Management, and a licensed practicing MD within the state of Kentucky, which was all eventually discovered to be false. Therefore this person was actually committing fraud, which is serious and disastrous due to the level of her position and delegated duties she was entrusted with at the college.

Yet unfortunately, despite the clear evidence against her and or her lack of legitimate verification of credentials, the scam didn't end there. The interim dean at the time and his newly appointed clinical department chair outright lied to the students and young faculty by essentially informing them there was zero concern about the person’s professional qualifications. Wally also had the gall to threaten expulsion or dismissal of anyone caught asking or discussing further about the matter. Eventually, months later the person directly in question was required to leave by people of higher or real authority. Surprisingly her two co-perpetrators/accomplices, which obviously should not be trusted in academia, are still there working for the school. Whenever asked by alumni about what happened, the two loyal co-perpetrators answer with "oh she retired", which of course is another lie. Therefore be careful about where you decide to invest your time and money.

This was Sullivan University College of Pharmacy (SUCOP)
 

PharmDoReMe

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Hell no. I would never go to that overpriced sh't hole. They don't even have a staffed cafeteria just a room where you can eat food. They target wealthy NYC's who are too stupid to get into local schools.

How's it a ****hole? I haven't heard of anyone so far complaining about it. Yeah it's ridiculously expensive, but I'm curious if other people say anything bad about it because so far I haven't.
 
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xyz8888

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“Kicked out for being a liar” is an understatement. This person was a real fraud/con-artist. She had documented and signed on numerous items of having qualifications as a PhD in Pathology, MS in Diabetes Management, and a licensed practicing MD within the state of Kentucky, which was all eventually discovered to be false. Therefore this person was actually committing fraud, which is serious and disastrous due to the level of her position and delegated duties she was entrusted with at the college.

Yet unfortunately, despite the clear evidence against her and or her lack of legitimate verification of credentials, the scam didn't end there. The interim dean at the time and his newly appointed clinical department chair outright lied to the students and young faculty by essentially informing them there was zero concern about the person’s professional qualifications. Wally also had the gall to threaten expulsion or dismissal of anyone caught asking or discussing further about the matter. Eventually, months later the person directly in question was required to leave by people of higher or real authority. Surprisingly her two co-perpetrators/accomplices, which obviously should not be trusted in academia, are still there working for the school. Whenever asked by alumni about what happened, the two loyal co-perpetrators answer with "oh she retired", which of course is another lie. Therefore be careful about where you decide to invest your time and money.

However to be fair it should also be noted that Wally's primary talents and specialty are his novel utilization and or application of alternative facts. Very talented guy.
 
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Modest_anteater

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I'm looking at potential pharmacy schools to apply to in the northeast. Any experiences with schools to avoid?
These are some of the worst schools to attend from www.Bestpharmacyschools.org that ranks schools by NAPLX success rate. overall I would say the worst school in the nation is Touro University in NYC. IT's a very expensive four year program in an expensive city with issues with corruption pay for grades ect.

#106 Texas Southern University 102 87% 79.63% Below average
#107 Long Island University 175 86% 76.73% Below average
#108 University of Saint Joseph 75 86% 79.52% Below average
#109 Sullivan University 87 86% 82.86% Below average
#110 University of New England 89 86% 80.25% Below average
#111 University of Maryland Eastern Shore 49 86% 74.07% Below average
#112 Howard University 53 85% 78.43% Below average
#113 University of Hawaii 81 85% 72.60% Below average
#114 Xavier University of Louisiana 140 84% 76.06% Below average
#115 Osteopathic Philadelphia College of Medicine, Georgia 84 84% 85.88% Below average
#116 Notre Dame of Maryland University 58 84% 85.45% Below average
#117 Roosevelt University 62 84% 80.00% Below average
#118 Manchester University 60 84% 81.43% Below average
#119 South College 76 83% 87.21% Below average
#120 Florida A&M University 144 83% 74.21% Below average
#121 Chicago State University 73 82% 78.26% Below average
#122 Cedarville University 46 80% 86.36% Below average
#123 Presbyterian College 72 80% 80.56% Below average
#124 Hampton University 59 79% 59.62% Below average
#125 Western New England University 67 78% 75.71% Far below average
#126 Rosalind Franklin University 59 77% 77.59% Far below average
#127 Marshall University 68 76% 85.48% Far below average
#128 Touro University of New York 91 75% 68.18% Far below average
#129 Husson University 55 73% 54.90% Far below average
#130 Fairleigh Dickinson University 71 70% 65.79% Far below average
 

American Princess

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These are some of the worst schools to attend from www.Bestpharmacyschools.org that ranks schools by NAPLX success rate. overall I would say the worst school in the nation is Touro University in NYC. IT's a very expensive four year program in an expensive city with issues with corruption pay for grades ect.

#106 Texas Southern University 102 87% 79.63% Below average
#107 Long Island University 175 86% 76.73% Below average
#108 University of Saint Joseph 75 86% 79.52% Below average
#109 Sullivan University 87 86% 82.86% Below average
#110 University of New England 89 86% 80.25% Below average
#111 University of Maryland Eastern Shore 49 86% 74.07% Below average
#112 Howard University 53 85% 78.43% Below average
#113 University of Hawaii 81 85% 72.60% Below average
#114 Xavier University of Louisiana 140 84% 76.06% Below average
#115 Osteopathic Philadelphia College of Medicine, Georgia 84 84% 85.88% Below average
#116 Notre Dame of Maryland University 58 84% 85.45% Below average
#117 Roosevelt University 62 84% 80.00% Below average
#118 Manchester University 60 84% 81.43% Below average
#119 South College 76 83% 87.21% Below average
#120 Florida A&M University 144 83% 74.21% Below average
#121 Chicago State University 73 82% 78.26% Below average
#122 Cedarville University 46 80% 86.36% Below average
#123 Presbyterian College 72 80% 80.56% Below average
#124 Hampton University 59 79% 59.62% Below average
#125 Western New England University 67 78% 75.71% Far below average
#126 Rosalind Franklin University 59 77% 77.59% Far below average
#127 Marshall University 68 76% 85.48% Far below average
#128 Touro University of New York 91 75% 68.18% Far below average
#129 Husson University 55 73% 54.90% Far below average
#130 Fairleigh Dickinson University 71 70% 65.79% Far below average
My cousin graduated from TSU in 1986 and it took her a year to find a pharmacy job in a hospital. and TSU is the only school that my father will give me a free ride to for some strange reason.
 
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Modest_anteater

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My cousin graduated from TSU in 1986 and it took her a year to find a pharmacy job in a hospital. and TSU is the only school that my father will give me a free ride to for some strange reason.
not sure how it was back then but a year in 2019 to get a job isn't too bad. I would say if you get a job in under 3 years it's okay. It's when you take 5+ years to get a job and your debt balloons to like 700,000 USD things get bad
 

American Princess

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not sure how it was back then but a year in 2019 to get a job isn't too bad. I would say if you get a job in under 3 years it's okay. It's when you take 5+ years to get a job and your debt balloons to like 700,000 USD things get bad

TSU students: We were unfairly let go

By ABC13
Friday, August 20, 2010
HOUSTON While Texas Southern University is holding on to its accreditation, it has been ranked the lowest-performing pharmacy program in Texas, according to US News and World Report. Now, the school's administration is kicking students out of the program to bolster their standings and their prestige.

"Our goal is just to get out," pharmacy student Andrea Anderson said. "We want to be pharmacists. That is our dream."

Dozens of TSU pharmacy students shoved their way into a board of regents meeting, demanding improvements to their program and answers about why some of their classmates were kicked out of school based on a new set of guidelines in the student handbook.

One major complaint: the new rules straddled one school year.

"You can't hold one section of the class to a higher standard than the first section of the class," student Fred Walker said. "That's unethical."

Walker is one of 11 students that got an email, telling him he can't return to school this fall because he failed four classes in one semester.

"They didn't take into account the human factor," he said. "Some of us had extenuating circumstances."


The same thing happened to Beatrice Tembo-Jackson, who was banking on her starting salary once she got her degree and passed the licensing exam.


"I'm a mother of eight," she said. "So I have a family to feed, so I probably have to go back to work, pay back my school loans."


In the last school year, TSU's College of Pharmacy adopted more specific guidelines about dismissing students. It used to be students could be kicked out for demonstrating "poor overall performance."


Now, any student who receives less than a "C" in four or more classes in one semester -- or "exceeds time allowed to complete (their) degree" can get their white coat revoked.


"We have raised our expectation for student performance, and there's some tension around that," TSU's College of Pharmacy Dean Barbara Hayes said.


While the dean of the school says the stricter guidelines will make for a better batch of pharmacists, students, even those in good-standing, are left wondering whether better teachers and more organized classes would better prepare them to pass in the first place.


"Before you consider dismissing someone, you have to first look, 'Did we as a college support this student enough to help them succeed?'" student Gwendolyn Burgess said.

TSU's pharmacy school has endured a history of problems. One student told me she had 19 teachers for one class in one semester, none of which showed up for reviews, or class sometimes. She also said she just can't be expected to excel in that environment.


There is also a lawsuit against the school and the dean because of these student dismissals.
 

Sine Cura

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"That is our dream"

"failed four classes in one semester"

"mother of eight"

Bunch of winners here. However TSU did these poor students a disservice and shouldn't have accepted them in the first place.
 
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mentos

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TSU students: We were unfairly let go

By ABC13
Friday, August 20, 2010
HOUSTON While Texas Southern University is holding on to its accreditation, it has been ranked the lowest-performing pharmacy program in Texas, according to US News and World Report. Now, the school's administration is kicking students out of the program to bolster their standings and their prestige.

"Our goal is just to get out," pharmacy student Andrea Anderson said. "We want to be pharmacists. That is our dream."

Dozens of TSU pharmacy students shoved their way into a board of regents meeting, demanding improvements to their program and answers about why some of their classmates were kicked out of school based on a new set of guidelines in the student handbook.

One major complaint: the new rules straddled one school year.

"You can't hold one section of the class to a higher standard than the first section of the class," student Fred Walker said. "That's unethical."

Walker is one of 11 students that got an email, telling him he can't return to school this fall because he failed four classes in one semester.

"They didn't take into account the human factor," he said. "Some of us had extenuating circumstances."


The same thing happened to Beatrice Tembo-Jackson, who was banking on her starting salary once she got her degree and passed the licensing exam.


"I'm a mother of eight," she said. "So I have a family to feed, so I probably have to go back to work, pay back my school loans."


In the last school year, TSU's College of Pharmacy adopted more specific guidelines about dismissing students. It used to be students could be kicked out for demonstrating "poor overall performance."


Now, any student who receives less than a "C" in four or more classes in one semester -- or "exceeds time allowed to complete (their) degree" can get their white coat revoked.


"We have raised our expectation for student performance, and there's some tension around that," TSU's College of Pharmacy Dean Barbara Hayes said.


While the dean of the school says the stricter guidelines will make for a better batch of pharmacists, students, even those in good-standing, are left wondering whether better teachers and more organized classes would better prepare them to pass in the first place.


"Before you consider dismissing someone, you have to first look, 'Did we as a college support this student enough to help them succeed?'" student Gwendolyn Burgess said.

TSU's pharmacy school has endured a history of problems. One student told me she had 19 teachers for one class in one semester, none of which showed up for reviews, or class sometimes. She also said she just can't be expected to excel in that environment.


There is also a lawsuit against the school and the dean because of these student dismissals.

19 teachers for one class in one semester wtf?
 
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Pharmacy is a Scam

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19 teachers for one class in one semester wtf?
Probably had a course chair who invited a different speaker for each lecture of a class. This was how my school taught their therapeutics courses. Sucks for the students but it's a genius way for the school to cut down on admin costs, actually. If practicing pharmacists/residents are willing to guest lecture for free to pad their resumes or gain teaching experience, then you can effectively run entire courses without needing to pay for actual teaching faculty.

That's why pharmacy schools are so profitable and it's ridiculously easy to start one up - all you need in startup costs are a few research/clinical faculty (for credibility purposes only), a dean, and a couple of administrators/coordinators. The bulk of the "teaching faculty" can literally be outsourced for free.
 

Secret_Informant

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19 teachers for one class in one semester wtf?

The USF Taneja College of Pharmacy had the following when I was in pharmacy school (2014-2018):

*Note, the semesters below are in parenthesis.

1. 15 full-time professors for Pharmaceutical Skills VI (Spring 2017).
2. SEVEN full-time professors and SEVEN guest lecturers (total of 14) for Translational Pharmacogenomics (Spring 2017).
3. 14 PharmD professors and SEVEN from the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Pharmacotherapeutics, A TOTAL OF 21 different instructors. The Pharmacotherapeutics sequence is four semesters long (I-IV during the PY2 and PY3 years before the PY4 rotations). Guest lecturers were not included in some cases and were (of course) not available for in-person discussions (except after the lecture). They have other jobs, you know. However, students did have to take a survey on each of them, including the adjunct, temporary, and full-time instructors. It was daunting to say the least. If those surveys were not completed, then you did not move on to the next level. Keep in mind that some full-time professors are appointed in multiple departments.

Some professors provided guest lecturers in multiple courses, including Pharmacogenomics, Pharmaceutical Skills, and the Pharmacotherapeutics sequence, while other guest lectures were taught by either residency-trained pharmacists or experienced pharmacy professionals, PhD researchers and professors, and even other pharmacists that had experience in the field (called ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS). The format was either via an online video or face-to-face.

All students were required to keep up with the material; some students were non-traditional with families and financial, personal, and medical issues as well. NO ONE COMPLAINED (for some reason)! Why? BECAUSE THEY GOT THE WORK DONE, AS DID I!

Based on my experience, having multiple instructors seems common for pharmacy schools to do to address multiple pieces of the PharmD curriculum. What is the real issue here?
 
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American Princess

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Probably had a course chair who invited a different speaker for each lecture of a class. This was how my school taught their therapeutics courses. Sucks for the students but it's a genius way for the school to cut down on admin costs, actually. If practicing pharmacists/residents are willing to guest lecture for free to pad their resumes or gain teaching experience, then you can effectively run entire courses without needing to pay for actual teaching faculty.

That's why pharmacy schools are so profitable and it's ridiculously easy to start one up - all you need in startup costs are a few research/clinical faculty (for credibility purposes only), a dean, and a couple of administrators/coordinators. The bulk of the "teaching faculty" can literally be outsourced for free.
I don't think that they had guest speakers for that one class either. I heard from a very reliable source that TSU pharmacy school has a lot of administrative problems and that I shouldn't go there and that was back in 2006. My cousin graduated from there back in 1986 and she didn't get her first job until 1987. I know there was a community college that was helping with IV training all of the TSU pharmacy school students too and I'm not sure if they are doing that right now anymore. I've seen there passing rates for the license exam as low as 68% and as high as 86% for first time test takers according to the Texas State Board of Pharmacy. I've also heard that they hire some of their current top students to help them with tutoring students before they take the licensing exam.
 

Pharmacy is a Scam

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I don't think that they had guest speakers for that one class either. I heard from a very reliable source that TSU pharmacy school has a lot of administrative problems and that I shouldn't go there and that was back in 2006. My cousin graduated from there back in 1986 and she didn't get her first job until 1987. I know there was a community college that was helping IV training the TSU pharmacy school students too.
How does this school manage to survive then?
 

American Princess

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"That is our dream"

"failed four classes in one semester"

"mother of eight"

Bunch of winners here. However TSU did these poor students a disservice and shouldn't have accepted them in the first place.
There was a post on this forum that stated that all eleven students were restated back into the program but I don't know if all eleven of them graduated from this program.
 

Heroic Combo

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HUSSON University in Maine. In 2017 they had the worst pass rate on the NAPLEX in existence (57% pass). Also, it seems MCPHS has been going down hill with test scores. I highly recommend Albany College of Pharmacy, especially their Vermont campus. It just turned to an accelerated program though. My class had only 30 kids, and the professors were very good. I would also recommend the Albany campus. Pass rates are good. Also, ACPHS just implemented the first biopharmaceutics school within it called CBET. They founded it with 37 million dollars very recently (2 weeks ago?) and is the only Pharm.D program that has this program which is specifically designed to gear students up for industry work, including manufacturing of complex/newer biologics.
 

American Princess

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HUSSON University in Maine. In 2017 they had the worst pass rate on the NAPLEX in existence (57% pass). Also, it seems MCPHS has been going down hill with test scores. I highly recommend Albany College of Pharmacy, especially their Vermont campus. It just turned to an accelerated program though. My class had only 30 kids, and the professors were very good. I would also recommend the Albany campus. Pass rates are good. Also, ACPHS just implemented the first biopharmaceutics school within it called CBET. They founded it with 37 million dollars very recently (2 weeks ago?) and is the only Pharm.D program that has this program which is specifically designed to gear students up for industry work, including manufacturing of complex/newer biologics.

wow.
 
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