wow a DO school ranked number 4

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DORoe

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correct me if i'm wrong but didn't WVSOM get ranked in the top 10 last year? They aren't even on the list this year I wonder how that happened?
 

NRAI2001

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I don't know, i ve never really looked at the list before. I was just really surprised that a DO school was ranked so high. I m just wondering why people have issues with DO's being accepted and considered doctors when there is a DO school ranked 4th best in the country for primary care.
 

kendall

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if i'm not mistaken, univ. of n. texas hsc was also in the top 20 for primary care. most osteo schools really push (not in a bad way) primary care, and many were founded to meet a need for primary care docs in an underserved area; that is certainly the case for Pikeville. i would say that we will see more and more osteo schools getting recognized for excellence in primary care education in the coming years. it is interesting to note however, that none of the DO's i know are in primary care. huh... go figure.
 

NRAI2001

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Originally posted by kendall
if i'm not mistaken, univ. of n. texas hsc was also in the top 20 for primary care. most osteo schools really push (not in a bad way) primary care, and many were founded to meet a need for primary care docs in an underserved area; that is certainly the case for Pikeville. i would say that we will see more and more osteo schools getting recognized for excellence in primary care education in the coming years. it is interesting to note however, that none of the DO's i know are in primary care. huh... go figure.

What do the DO's u know do?
 

kendall

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rads, gs, ob/gyn, GI

actually, i guess ob/gyn is considered pc, but none of them do FP, peds, or gen. IM.

kendall
 

YoungFaithful

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Does anyone know the specific method used to rank these school in USN&R?
 

fullefect1

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Usually Us news ranking are by funding, but i can't really see how they could do this for the primary care field, especially considering DO schools usually wouldn't compete with the large amounts that many MD schools get for funding.
 

PublicHealth

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I wonder if more DOs would go into primary care if the cost of DO schools wasn't so (damn) much.

Here's a neat article about the differences between osteopathic medicine and allopathic medicine with respect to primary care:

J Gen Intern Med. 1999 Dec;14(12):730-9.

Comparison of osteopathic and allopathic medical Schools' support for primary care.

Peters AS, Clark-Chiarelli N, Block SD.

Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Helath Care, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

OBJECTIVE: To contrast prevailing behaviors and attitudes relative to primary care education and practice in osteopathic and allopathic medical schools. DESIGN: Descriptive study using confidential telephone interviews conducted in 1993-94. Analyses compared responses of osteopaths and allopaths, controlling for primary care orientation. SETTING: United States academic health centers. PARTICIPANTS: National stratified probability samples of first-year and fourth-year medical students, postgraduate year 2 residents, and clinical faculty in osteopathic and allopathic medical schools, a sample of allopathic deans, and a census of deans of osteopathic schools (n = 457 osteopaths; n = 2,045 allopaths). MEASUREMENTS: Survey items assessed personal characteristics, students' reasons for entering medicine, learners' primary care educational experiences, community support for primary care, and attitudes toward the clinical and academic competence of primary care physicians. MAIN RESULTS: Primary care physicians composed a larger fraction of the faculty in osteopathic schools than in allopathic schools. Members of the osteopathic community were significantly more likely than their allopathic peers to describe themselves as socioemotionally oriented rather than technoscientifically oriented. Osteopathic learners were more likely than allopathic learners to have educational experiences in primary care venues and with primary care faculty, and to receive encouragement from faculty, including specialists, to enter primary care. Attitudes toward the clinical and academic competence of primary care physicians were consistently negative in both communities. Differences between communities were sustained after controlling for primary care orientation. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with allopathic schools, the cultural practices and educational structures in osteopathic medical schools better support the production of primary care physicians. However, there is a lack of alignment between attitudes and practices in the osteopathic community.
 

PublicHealth

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Originally posted by YoungFaithful
Does anyone know the specific method used to rank these school in USN&R?

http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/grad/rankings/about/04method_brief.php

http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/grad/rankings/about/04med_meth_brief.php

These explanations are not very clear, as they fail to explain how they statistically arrived at the scores and respective rankings.

Keep in mind that subjectivity enters into these rankings at many levels when deans, program directors, senior faculty, and practicing professionals are asked to judge the overall academic quality of programs in their field on a scale of 1 ("marginal") to 5 ("outstanding").
 

YoungFaithful

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Wow, thanks Public.

Interesting, so what I got from the data is that most of the rankings are based upon opinions of those that are involved in the programs? For example: MSU's dean, etc.. were surveyed on their own school. This seems very, very subjective. Hmm...

Also a big part of the rankings (I presume) is the % of Dr's that get residencies in primary care, which really has nothing to do with the quality of the program.
 

Fenrezz

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Originally posted by PublicHealth
I wonder if more DOs would go into primary care if the cost of DO schools wasn't so (damn) much.

Yeah, it's hard to justify going into family practice when you come out of medical school sometimes as high as $250,000 in the hole.
 

DORoe

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Ok well I decided to do a little digging about this as I am thinking about primary care maybe. Ok a doctor that has $250,000 in debt if they were to consolidate their loans now (at 2.85%) would have a monthly payment for 10 years of $2,704.13. That adds up to $32449.56 per year. Ok I then went and got the average salary for a doctor (nationwide) and found that for primary care it is $147,516, for internal medicine it is $160,318, and for pediatrics it is $149,754. These are averages in 2002 for doctors in practice for 3 years. here is the link With my calculations that means that a family practitioner will clear about 115k. That seems pretty good to me. How much is the average malpractice insurance for a pc physician?
 

stoic

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I remember hearing malpractice for IM and FP (no OB) runs between 15k and 25k per year, depending on location, provider and the exact structure of your plan.

Don't forget that taxes will take a big chunk (around 50-60k) out of your 150k.

150k (base) - 50k (taxes) - 20k (malpractice) - 32.5k (student loans) = 47.5k (take home)

Holy crap. I just scared myself. I'm interested in FP.... but I'd never crunched the numbers before. Please someone tell me my math is wrong. 50k a year after 11 years of school/residency sucks.

Dave
 

DORoe

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Thats if you take out loans for 10 years. If you go into FP I guess you would just have to take the extended payment plan. If you do that it cuts your payment down to $1166.49 (over 30 years). So that is about 14k per year. So that leaves you with a take home of only 66k (going by your numbers). wow that sucks!
 
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