flanagan10

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 19, 2004
32
0
Status
Hi Guys,

I'm probably going to be applying to programs in the next 3-4 years, wondering if anyone applied at Yale, as that is where I will probably be wanting to be (Mennin and Nolen-Hoeksema are two people I am very interested in).

Anyone meet or have interviews there?

Thoughts?
 

JatPenn

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2005
223
1
Status
Yale's clinical psychology program is probably not only the toughest psychology program in the country to get into, but aside from Harvard Law possibly the toughest post-bacc program to get into, period.

Given that, work to establish a near perfect research match with whomever you'd like to work with there and you'll have the best shot.
 

PublicHealth

Membership Revoked
Removed
15+ Year Member
Mar 18, 2003
2,271
5
Visit site
Status
JatPenn said:
Yale's clinical psychology program is probably not only the toughest psychology program in the country to get into, but aside from Harvard Law possibly the toughest post-bacc program to get into, period.

Given that, work to establish a near perfect research match with whomever you'd like to work with there and you'll have the best shot.
That, and make sure the junior faculty psychology with whom you'd like to work will be around to see you through to completion of your dissertation. Most are considered "visiting assistant professors" and usually hang around for no more than five years before moving off to tenure-track positions elsewhere.
 

SaraL124

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 29, 2005
266
1
Status
I don't even know if anyone on here has applied there. If you want to get the perspective of a current student there, search the Psychology Dept website. Often, these programs list their graduate students' CV, bio sketch and contact info. Maybe that would help with what you're looking for.
 

Anon82

New Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 1, 2005
6
0
Status
flanagan10 said:
Anyone on the board actually been accepted?
I was accepted this year, to work with Nolen-Hoeksema. I'd be happy to speak with you about Yale's program - you can email me at [email protected].

Good luck with the application process - I'm glad it's almost over for me!
 

OneLove

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 26, 2004
119
0
Status
I'm a little bit confused. When you apply for the PhD programs, you have to choose who you will be doing your research with? Don't all pHd students start off by taking general clinical psyc classes?
 

Anony.1652

New Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 10, 2005
4
0
Status
OneLove said:
I'm a little bit confused. When you apply for the PhD programs, you have to choose who you will be doing your research with? Don't all pHd students start off by taking general clinical psyc classes?

In response to your question, you donthave to know exactly what you want to do. But you need to know your interests and when you write your letter for graduate admissions it is extrememly helpful to know who exactlyyou are interested in working with. Sometimes its even better to have been in contact with that professor as they can give you some insight into the program. The reason for picking a professor is because typically funding comes in by being an R.A. and you work in a professors lab your M.A. (if required) comes from that lab and your professor is your mentor in that area. Its also beneficial to know who and what you want to work with so youre not in the process of just sending applications to whoever. in clinical psychology you can expect to be in competition with over 300 other applicants and saying I wish to work with so and so limits that number :)! But I have seen people admitted into programs with general interest such as adhd or alcohol and the professor decided to take that student. But I have also seen people denied for not having put down a specific professor ( something schools dont always mention they want students to do)... Think of graduate school in psychology as your training for a job. what do you want your training to be in. what are your goals, are publications going to be important to that career. clinical? get some experience working in the field-what populations interest you . Youll find professors have specific interests when you start looking at it, and they want students to continue and help on that research (ideally).
 

OneLove

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 26, 2004
119
0
Status
so is grad school for clinical psych basically one huge block of research? are there lectures and classes as well? I'm very confused. Also, I would like to be a practicing psychologist ( possibly a neuropsychologist), and would not like to go the psy d route. How do I find the program that is rightg for me?
 

JatPenn

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2005
223
1
Status
OneLove said:
so is grad school for clinical psych basically one huge block of research? are there lectures and classes as well? I'm very confused. Also, I would like to be a practicing psychologist ( possibly a neuropsychologist), and would not like to go the psy d route. How do I find the program that is rightg for me?
Why don't you want the PsyD? You say you want to practice psychology and sound wary of research, the PsyD was designed specifically for students like you.
 

SaraL124

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 29, 2005
266
1
Status
OneLove said:
so is grad school for clinical psych basically one huge block of research? are there lectures and classes as well? I'm very confused. Also, I would like to be a practicing psychologist ( possibly a neuropsychologist), and would not like to go the psy d route. How do I find the program that is rightg for me?
There are classes in grad school....but there is also alot of research, depending on which kind of program you go to. You can go to a PhD program that is more clinically-oriented and not have to do so much research, or vice-versa. Normally, from what I've been told at interviews and from current students is that you take a full load of clases in your first 2 years and also work 10-20 hours a week in your research mentor's lab. In your second year, you complete the master's thesis. Third year often involves less class work, more research and a clinical practicum, and fourth year you work on your doctoral thesis, externship, maybe a few classes, etc.

To find the program that's right for you, start by identifying professors you'd like to work with. Try searches on PsycInfo or PsycArticles for topics you are interested in and check out who the authors are and what schools they are with. (keep in mind, not all authors are at a school that offers a Clin Psych PhD). Also, try checking out that book, Guide to Clin and Counseling PhD Programs or whatever it's called. It lists faculty research interests for each school and how many grants there are (it's not always up-to-date but its a good guideline starting point).

Good Luck!
 

OneLove

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 26, 2004
119
0
Status
JatPenn said:
Why don't you want the PsyD? You say you want to practice psychology and sound wary of research, the PsyD was designed specifically for students like you.

I feel that even though a psy d is certainly as hard to obtain as a phd, it is looked down upon by employers. This is not the major reason though. My biggest reason is because I would have to pay for a psy d eduction whereas I will get a phd one for free if I get into a program. Sorry if I sound ignornat :/
 

PsychMode

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Aug 14, 2004
215
0
Status
I notice Salovey at Yale does HIV research. Is he active in the clinical (e.g., taking students)? I noticed elsewhere on the site that a student appears to be involved in HIV research, so I'm guessing she is working with him.