Futuredoctr

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Okay, I just passed my boards, and I start my 3rd year here in a few weeks. Up first is Anesthesiology, and I was curious if I could get some nuggets of advice from those who have been there, are doing it, or on the other end and what you expect? I definitly haven't ruled it out as something that I would like to do, but as my first rotation, I'm all ears and eyes. Thanks!
 

lfesiam

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Okay, I just passed my boards, and I start my 3rd year here in a few weeks. Up first is Anesthesiology, and I was curious if I could get some nuggets of advice from those who have been there, are doing it, or on the other end and what you expect? I definitly haven't ruled it out as something that I would like to do, but as my first rotation, I'm all ears and eyes. Thanks!
A life saving skill that you want to pick up from this rotation is intubation.

Watching an intubation video, practicing on a dummy, knowing the anatomy prior to your first real intubation will be helpful.

Good book - anesthesia secrets or baby miller.:thumbup: Good luck!
 

Gimlet

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A life saving skill that you want to pick up from this rotation is intubation.

Watching an intubation video, practicing on a dummy, knowing the anatomy prior to your first real intubation will be helpful.

Good book - anesthesia secrets or baby miller.:thumbup: Good luck!
Intubation is good, but IMO learning how to properly and effectively mask-ventilate someone should be the first priority on a JMS anesthesiology rotation.
 

aredoubleyou

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Just show up...thats about it. If you think you might like it come back during your forth year after youve done medicine and surgery and we might have something to talk about. Dont worry about the pharmacology, the doses, the procedures, ...if you can ask questions relating basic physiology to whats going on in the case, youre cooking with gas...as my old man says
 

lfesiam

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Intubation is good, but IMO learning how to properly and effectively mask-ventilate someone should be the first priority on a JMS anesthesiology rotation.
Weight training with your fingers, forearms, and biceps/triceps prior to your rotation :thumbup:
 

aredoubleyou

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Oh yea, and when we send you home at 10 am, go! Its not a trick. Just leave. You'll still get an A grade. Now please go.
 

Chrysanthemum

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Oh yea, and when we send you home at 10 am, go! Its not a trick. Just leave. You'll still get an A grade. Now please go.
:laugh:

hahahahahha the residents used to tell me to go home early but no matter how much they tried to convince me that it would be okay I would still stay until about 3-4. I was not buying it lol
 

Ferdie

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:laugh:

hahahahahha the residents used to tell me to go home early but no matter how much they tried to convince me that it would be okay I would still stay until about 3-4. I was not buying it lol
the reason everyone thinks anesthesia goes home by 2 every day... as a ca-1, after surviving intern year, you find out we actually stick around until 4,5,6 (somewhere in there) on a daily basis. I wouldn't trade it for anything though - WAAAAY better than writing medicine H and Ps and fielding obnoxious pages on a daily basis!
 

Licoricestick

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Intubation is good, but IMO learning how to properly and effectively mask-ventilate someone should be the first priority on a JMS anesthesiology rotation.
Absolutely - ventilation is the life saving skill. NOBODY dies from failure to intubate.
 
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Futuredoctr

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Thanks! Yeah, I'm totally excited! My school prepared me well for intubation on manikins several times over the past two years, but I know that is really nothing like the real deal.

I was curious about "cooking with gas" and asking questions about the physio...are you suggesting that I shouldn't ask those questions?

Also, why do you send home students at 10 am?

(Just curious so I don't ask stupid questions (or more anyway)). Thanks again!
 

anesthesiadoc

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Intubation is good, but IMO learning how to properly and effectively mask-ventilate someone should be the first priority on a JMS anesthesiology rotation.
+1. It takes hundreds of intubations to be good. + you need to have a blade and tube handy. Floors should all have an ambu bag, mask and O2 with their crash cart. As a non-anesthesiologist or non-ER doc, you're more likely to have a positive impact on a patient in respiratory distress or arrest by having good form in your bag mask ventilation.
 

Impromptu

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If you can go to your pediatric hospital and find the ENT OR, you can get lots of practice mask ventilating during the myringotomies. Plus, they turn over cases quicker, so you may be able to get more IVs and intubations. These are all skills that require practice. One veteran attending used to say to me when placing arterial lines in premature babies, "it's only the first 10,000 that are hard".

Brush up on your autonomic drugs, like phenylephrine or whatever ones they seem to use. You'll probably get to push it in various patients and it is nice to know what you are doing to that body laying on the table.
 

dfk

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+1. It takes hundreds of intubations to be good...
and many hardly recognizable unexpected difficluties (and what to do) that come about with experiences. that's the key.