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20 year old

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by seminolepremed, Jul 24, 2011.

  1. seminolepremed

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    Hi,
    I was just wondering how my chances look; I'm sure many do this, but I'm new here and I would like your opinion. :)

    I go to Florida State, I'm a Biochemistry major, minoring in Bio and hopefully Math too. My GPA is a 3.63 overall, 3.63 science. I'm graduating in three years... and I'm not sure how great that looks. I kinda did it to impress the med schools, but now that I'm applying I've heard A LOT of negative feedback about it. I just turned twenty in June, which I statistically speaking is pretty young for med school... I consider myself to be mature, otherwise I don't think I would be able to get this far and be this determined, but aren't we all? I'm a woman, and I am Hispanic, more specifically Cuban. Does that help me at all? I heard a few things about Cuban-Americans not being a "minority" in med school. I'm not really Cuban-American, since I was born there I'm full Cuban, does that make a different either?

    I'm taking my MCAT in 19 days, I'm so over studying I just want to take it already. I'm around a 29-ish right now, but hoping to reach 32 at least.

    I do organic chemistry research.. I have my thesis that I am working on. Don't really have much clinical experience though, except for in high school (which was two years ago, therefore I included it).



    AHHHHH, what do you think? Any chance?

    I figured I'm non-trad since I'm graduating in 3 yrs?
     
    #1 seminolepremed, Jul 24, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2011
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  3. NightGod

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    Hispanic will help a lot, especially female Hispanic. Your score on the MCAT is important now (this seems a bit early to be taking it, as well, unless you are applying for 2012 matriculation, in which case it's a bit late). You're a bit weak on ECs, you really should look into volunteering (clinical and non-clinical) and shadowing during this next year. I don't know that the three-year graduation is going to make much difference one way or the other, honestly your GPA is what matters and yours is solid.
     
  4. seminolepremed

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    Yes, I am applying for the 2012 cycle. I understand that it is late, but I honestly had no other time to take it and I figured I might have a chance this cycle. I'm also shooting for schools in my state (Florida) , more specifically UM, FIU or FAU. UM is my top choice, but the MCAT there is around a 32. I have already sent in my AMCAS application; however, is it not complete until my MCAT score is in?
     
  5. mauberley

    mauberley radiating prestige
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    You should receive invitations to secondary applications, but your applications at schools will not be reviewed until your score is in.
     
  6. NightGod

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    With a 2012 matriculation in mind, you're going to have an uphill battle with your lack of volunteer work and clinical exposure compounded with your later application and uncertain MCAT.
     
  7. TriagePreMed

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    Without EC, your chance to get into med school is poor, especially OOS. Being Cuban in Florida is dime a dozen, so I wouldn't call that an advantage for in-state. Being late in the cycle won't help either

    By the way, you're not a non-trad. Just a 20 year old that rushed it.

    I would wait a year and spend that time building EC, although it'll be obvious you did it last minute and just for med school.
     
  8. plauto

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    YOu are very late for the MCAT. The latest I'd take it is beginning of July assuming that the rest of your application is in and verified by the beginning of July as well. You have 2 options:
    #1: apply for this cycle and hope that you get lucky. Biggest problem with this is that if you don't get in this time around, you will be a re-applicant next year, not ideal.
    #2: apply next year and should get in somewhere assuming your MCAT goes well
     
  9. seminolepremed

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    I agree that I am late, but to graduate early I've had to take 13-15 credits of all science courses every semester. I don't think anyone can have time to study for the MCAT, let alone get clinical experience, when working 20-30 hours a week in a lab as well. You guys dont think they will notice I have made the best of my time these past two years? I volunteered at UM Sylvester Cancer Center for 80 hours, and I made it one of my most significant experiences. I dont think my EC's are that bad. Isn't it about quality vs quantity? Would I even get interviews?

    I just feel like "clinical experience" is a bunch of BS. The grasp on science should overlap it. Learning how to inject is so freaking trivial to medicine ... the practical aspect will be learned quickly. I feel like clinical experience would be more relevant to nursing or something. I know I want to be a doctor, I don't think I need to stare at hospital walls to prove it.

    IDK, my two cents. But you guys know more. I appreciate the feedback. I just need a kickass MCAT score.
     
  10. theseeker4

    theseeker4 PGY 3
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    You can't look at whether something you are doing for your application is necessary. Med school acceptance is a game. There are steps you need to complete to have a chance at beating the 23,000 or so students who do not gain admission each year. Clinical experience is one of those. Yes, it is completely trivial. However, if the adcom sees two applicants, one who has a ton of hours and one who does not, the applicant who put in more hours has the advantage.

    Quality over quantity, but longevity is something they look at too. You may not have any problems, but adcoms MAY wonder why you couldn't fit a few hours a week of volunteering in every semester. Maybe it won't matter, but you are competing against a lot of students, many of whom have better stats than you (simply due to the volume, not because your stats are poor) so you have to try to increase your application however you can. Volunteering and then stopping when you reach 80 hours MIGHT look like you are just "checking a box" whether you are or not. Continuing to volunteer every week, even if just for a few hours, shows a long-term commitment which is what adcoms are looking for.
     
  11. seminolepremed

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    Thanks for your feedback.

    This is so nerve racking. I just want to be in med school already. AHHHHHHHH :\
     
  12. SisterDisco08

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    :) you were exactly me last cycle. FSU should be really great to you. They're really accepting. Age was not a problem for me there, and as a Michigan resident with few/no ties to FL, I was pretty impressed that they told me I would have gotten a spot last cycle, had they had room (class was full by the time I interviewed).

    About me, just to give you something to reference:
    -3.56 cGPA from UMich, Honors, something around 3.4 sGPA
    -Pretty awful MCAT, retaking Aug 5
    -Amazing ECs (w/ leadership)
    -Amazing LoR
    -Interested in Primary Care (hence FSU)
    -Applied at 20
    -graduated in 3 years
    -doing UMich MS in Physiology this year
    -2 years research, with Honors thesis
    -FSU Dean (Dr. Patrick) told me I was within the next few people who would have gotten spots in c/o 2015 off of Hold (they only took 4 ppl).
    -Applied in October 2010
    -Interviewed St. Patty's day at FSU


    Anyway, main point: your florida schools will show you some love, especially FSU. So you're pretty much me but in state and should have a lot easier time getting in somewhere like FSU!

    Feel free to PM if you want to chat :)
     
  13. TriagePreMed

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    Well, it's not about what you think is best to become a physician. It's about what people that are in the committees, who have a medical education, decide is necessary to have quality physicians. You rushed your time in school and sacrificed being a well rounded applicant. If I were an ADCOM, I would not admit you. There's literally hundreds of other kids with your stats that have proven to be able to play ball and show me personality in addition to numbers.
     
  14. n3xa

    n3xa "the anchor"
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    But science totally does overlap medicine? Or did you mean science/science research is an appropriate substitute for "clinical experience?"

    Why is clinical experience more relevant to nursing as opposed to medicine?
     
  15. wholeheartedly

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    I also think you might be rushing this a bit, and believe me I can relate to that temptation. Try thinking about things in a short term sacrifice (waiting another year to apply and round yourself out more) long term gain way (better odds of acceptance as a first time applicant sparing you the costs of going through the app process twice with all the app fees, secondary fees, interview trips, just general stressing).

    More generally and not necessarily directed at the OP, I do have to disagree about clinical experience being trivial. It isn't on the list of suggestions so you can learn how to give injections, draw blood, or wheel patients around.

    Certain types might be trivial, but working in a hospital can definitely give you a much different and more complete view on the inner workings of medicine that you won't be privy to otherwise. It can let you see if you truly like interacting with patients. It's supposed to give you a view of what the dirty sides of medicine are like as well as the good stuff, and if you still want to be a part of it. To see if you still want it after seeing some of the politics, some less than appreciative patients, arrogant doctors and hospital staff, the way patient care might be touted as the primary concern even as it falls to the wayside under the weight of insurance roadblocks, hospital politics, and people who are only there to put in the bare minimum required to get paid while you're busting your butt to do what's right and best for somebody who is sick and scared.

    It's to show the adcom you aren't going in blind. I've got a hunch that people who know what they are getting into, really know, and still want that challenge and are still passionate about doing medicine are more likely to stick with medicine as a career longterm than those who get blindsided by some of the realities as a med student or resident.

    Just my two cents and again this is more of a general thought on the topic than necessarily referring to the OP in particular.
     
  16. plauto

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    From somebody who sits on an admission committee....being young when applying rarely plays in your favor. Your MCAT must be good, nobody cares why it is not. Your attitude towards the importance of clinical experience is the reason why med schools do not like to accept young people. To be a good doctor you need to be well rounded and must have meaningful life experiences behind.
     
  17. ejw5075

    ejw5075 Smile.
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    I posted almost the same thread ~18 months ago. I also graduated in three years and applied at 19-20, my age did not hurt me in the slightest. Had my first day of medical school today (12 hour long day :eek: ) and being the youngest in my class had absolutely no impact on my interactions with peers or facilitators/faculty.

    That being said, if I were in your position, I would hold off a year. There is absolutely no need to rush when you are so young, or at any age for that matter. Get the experiences you need and take sufficient time to prep for the MCAT.
     
  18. kraskadva

    kraskadva ...
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    wow tiger...

    OP, you first posted asking for your chances, and you've gotten some honest replies. Obviously you're gung-ho about doing this now and no one's going to sway you. Which is great...be determined.
    However, some of those honest replies were obviously not what you wanted to hear. Don't disregard them just because they're not reassuring or go against your opinions. You did ask, after all.

    I also graduated college at 20...6 years ago. There was no reason why I couldn't have applied to med school at that point, if I'd had your determination and done the pre-reqs. I would have been fine. However I'm really glad I didn't.
    Many people told me at the time, nobody could convince me then (and I'm sure no one can convince you now) but the way you think does change as you get older. Mostly due to life experience.
    Could I have handled med school then? sure.
    Am I better able to handle med school now? absolutely.

    So if things don't pan out for you this year, don't flip out. Take a breather, and go do something else for a year or two before coming back at it. It won't be time wasted. Promise. And even with a couple of years off, you'd still be in the traditional student age range.

    Also, regarding clinical experience, I disagree with you, but that's neither here nor there. I don't really care if you're convinced of its merits.
    What I would like to say is, for your own sake, don't spew that line in an interview, if you get one. You'd only convince the adcom (rightly or wrongly) of your immaturity and inexperience.
     
  19. SisterDisco08

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    +1!

    Just to add to my first post--I'm actually kind of glad I didn't end up getting off the waitlist at FSU last cycle. Now I have the opportunity to go on a TOMS Shoes shoe drop to a country of my choice over the next year, I will be able to go to my cousin's wedding in Greece, I get some say in planning out a future with my SO, and I get to slow down/RELAX for the first time in years! I've also gotten some pretty great shadowing and job opportunities that I wouldn't have had...so, it's really not the end of the world if you don't get in this cycle, things end up working out. Who knows, maybe this cycle I'll actually have a few options other than FSU--I love FSU, but choices would be nice!

    Keep in mind that this will be your only opportunity to take advantage of a little (well-managed) free time, and med schools will probably look more favorably upon your application because of it! And you'll be way ahead of the cycle next cycle :)

    It's really hard to listen to people telling you to wait. You always have that little voice in the back of your head screaming about how you could be the exception. In retrospect, I would have waited a cycle so I could send out one fantastic set of apps. But last cycle I didn't even know enough about the app process to know that I had little-no chance of getting in with how late I applied, and several other factors. If you do choose to apply this year, and you don't get in, know that many schools will hold your applications from several cycles side by side when making a decision, and if not much has changed between one cycle and the next, you are even worse off than you started! So, if you don't get in this cycle, you might even have to wait another year before applying again. I was lucky with the connections/opportunities I have that I didn't have to, but I definitely recognize that it's not typical.
     
  20. n3xa

    n3xa "the anchor"
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    All of you who posted the punchlines after my questions... fun-ruiners, all of you! :p
     
  21. seminolepremed

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    Once again I truly appreciate your feedback. It doesn't do much else but bruise my ego a bit, but being told I can't do something has been there since day 1... we've all been against the odds from the start. I did not mean say clinical experience was irrelevant... I just feel, like someone implied, that it would be the icing on the cake. Does it show more eagerness? Believe me, I am pretty eager. Personally, I believe I am full of personality ... if they want to see my social development and/or more sides to me, I believe my application does a good job of that. If I do get interviews, they'll see I'm not a neurotic pre-med ... My school doesn't even know I'm "pre-med". I'm pursuing a biochemistry degree, which is the absolute truth. I have never wanted an A in the class for the sole purpose of medical school, but instead to learn the actual science. I am not enamored with the run-down fairytale many had in 1st grade of being a doctor. I love the pathophysiology, and if the byproduct of becoming a professional in the field helps people then that's freaking awesome. Many of my family members are doctors in Cuba, and I want to continue it in the states. And, although this endeavor has taken up much of my time, I have developed a multidimensional "me". If that's what they want to see, that I am not all academics, then I think I will be alright. But I kinda need an interview first. It does make me second, and triple guess my choice, but I think someone will see my potential. And if they don't, I'm taking the GRE soon.. I'll continue with biochem... who knows, apply for a job in UM Sylvester, and apply to UM next year. At least I won't wonder what if for the next 365 days. Thanks guys for the feedback, and the semi-bruised ego ... but I'll cure lives one day, and who knows... maybe a year will make a difference in someone's life. ;)

    P.S. I sorta vented... sorry. lol
     
  22. NightGod

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    But this is what we're trying to get across that you're not comprehending. It is NOT just the icing on the cake. It's an integral part of a well-rounded (read: successful) medical school application.

    Also keep in mind that if you do apply this year and aren't accepted, it actually makes things more difficult next time you apply. You don't start again at the same level playing field, it becomes ever more of an uphill battle.
     
  23. km17

    km17 Annyong
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    Here are my $0.02...I'll try to keep this short and sweet!

    You sound like you're passionate about science. I think your app, if you convey that like you have been in this thread, will show that quite clearly.

    Ok, so you've explained "why science." Check. Now you have to answer "why medicine?" The bolded text (above) doesn't explain that yet. Most scientific research, especially anything biological or chemical, does help people! That's why we do it!

    But now we have "I want to help people." That's good too, but still not quite to "why medicine."

    No one expects you to master practical skills by volunteering in a clinical setting. You're not allowed to do most of them. (Grasp on science is still just the "why science question.") However, by committing time regularly to doing some small service in a hospital, you show two things: 1) "I want to help people" (you already talked about this, but having action behind it is essential), and most importantly 2) "I understand first-hand what it means to care for a patient." #2, Caring for patients, not just helping people, is your missing link to "why medicine."

    High school experiences, if they weren't continued into college, don't demonstrate this passion, or in the very best case, any kind of commitment.

    So if you have clinical experience, now we have "why science," "I want to help people," and "I am committed to caring for people in need of healthcare." Ta-da! Does this make a bit more sense?

    All that aside, there are applicants who do get into medical school without clinical experience. If you check out the MSAR, you'll see that accepted students have clinical experience ~80-90% of the time. A candidate with your stats, on average (from the AAMC data), has between a ~50-70% chance of getting into med school (range for a 3.6-3.79 and a MCAT from 27-32). That would put a candidate without clinical experience as 10-20% of that 50-70%, or 5-14% chance to get in.

    EDIT: Apologies to all you statistics people out there. I know this was a gross over-simplification, but I just wanted to give some perspective.
     
    #22 km17, Jul 27, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2011
  24. n3xa

    n3xa "the anchor"
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    Well, as someone who did finish graduate school in the sciences, I will say that having a thick skin and letting go of your ego *now* will be helpful no matter what program you so choose. When I returned to a post-bacc program (re: 5th year undergrads.. literally) after grad school, I had forgotten just that not everyone was ok with taking constructive criticism or hell, even being asked a question after a presentation.

    No one's telling you that you *can't* do something, but that the chances might not be as favorable for reasons X, Y, and Z.
     
  25. SisterDisco08

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    Agreed, deeply. No one is doubting your capabilities--some of us have been in your shoes and are just trying to give you advice for how to put out your best application. You may very well get into a school this year, but if you waited a year, you would likely have choices, and not be pigeon-holed into whatever school you may get into just out of desperation...

    Again, no one is attacking your abilities. But when I applied last year, I had what I thought was pretty extensive shadowing/clinical experiences (Detroit ER, Neurosurgery, and UMich Head of Family Medicine), and when I had my reapplication consultations, several AdComs told me I needed more.

    The take-away: you want to send out your best application, once. For people like us, it's easier for us to do that and be successful applicants if we wait a year. One school even told me they wanted to interview me but they didn't because I graduated in three years instead of four.
     
  26. wholeheartedly

    Administrator 7+ Year Member

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    I Third this this, no one is trying to dissuade you from medicine or bruise your ego here. This is probably the most tactful forum on SDN with some of the most helpful people who try to give others a leg up even if they are long shots. They speak from their own valuable experiences in this process.

    What people here are trying to add is some other perspectives to the process that they feel you might not be considering and pointing out that applying as a reapplicant is very challenging endeavor. We don't know all the ins and outs and finer points of your app. It's certainly possible you could do just fine.

    Personally I'm not even advising you not to apply right now, just that I think it would be a good idea to sit down and honestly assess the risk of applying now vs. later and the emotional and financial costs of having to apply in another cycle, as well as the possible stigma of being a reapplicant. That's an analysis that only you have all the information to figure out.
     
  27. TriagePreMed

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    +1 to the fact that we are not trying to dissuade from medicine or saying she's incapable of becoming a doctor. Seems like getting the feedback you don't want has been triggering a lot of people lately.

    I didn't want to spell it out OP, but here's why EC is important:

    1. Aside from your commitments at school, you're capable of spending time in another activity.
    2. You show that you're willing to give your time to others even if it means disturbing your precious schedule.
    3. You are able to reflect on your own life. If you volunteer in a hospice or homeless shelter, it will allow you to appreciate your life better and to understand better the people that will be your patients.
    4. In ER shadowing, you're able to see people in their worst, even last, moment of their life. How does your Biochem book prove to you that you can handle this? I've literally have helped someone clean themselves. I know someone that had high grades and MCAT not go into medicine because they felt too emotionally bruised doing medical work.
    5. Shadowing allow you to see if medicine or the specialty you're thinking of is really what you want.
    6. Shadowing allows you to ask questions about the life of a doctor. It gives you an insight into someone that's walked the journey that you've walked. If you discover a pattern there (e.g. doctors complain about paperwork), would this make you reconsider medicine or the type of practice you will do?
    7. Leadership lets you deal with bull**** and give orders. Do you truly know how to stand up for yourself as a leader? Are you able to lead others? Do you like having to lead others?
    8. All your experiences allow you to gain maturity and show that you are well rounded.

    I could make this list probably 10 more points easily, but you probably catch my drift. You're acting like a child and clearly don't understand what it entails unless you walk the walk. Read a book like "house of god" and realize how many people became miserable with medicine because they went in during a time when all they needed was their grades. Some "icing" would have probably saved a lot people from living a life they don't enjoy.
     
  28. SisterDisco08

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    +1 for tough love.
     
  29. seminolepremed

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    Guys, I don't know why, but I still want to take the gamble.

    In hindsight, I wouldn't have done this in three years, but I can't stop now because I only have like 20 credits to take.

    Honestly, I would have loved to have clinical experience ... but I really have not had the time.

    So what should I do? After my MCAT I do have a lotttt o spare time to do some clinical work. Would it be futile to include any of this in secondaries, or would it look like I am just trying to fit the requirement? I would hate the adcoms to think I'm doing it just for it to "look good".


    The "damage" has been done. My AMCAS application is in and my MCAT studying is in full sail. Suggestions?

    Now I am deathly afraid of becoming a reapplicant -______-
     
  30. km17

    km17 Annyong
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    I would definitely start clinical volunteering after your MCAT. If you haven't actually logged any hours by the time secondaries come around, I wouldn't mention "I'm going to start volunteering" on them, but I would send update letters. Worst case scenario, admins think you're doing it just to get in (which means you care a lot about getting in to their school), and best case scenario, it makes your app stronger. Also, if you are in the unfortunate situation of having to apply next year, you'll have a year under your belt come next summer.

    I don't think you mentioned how many schools you were applying to, but if you didn't apply broadly, you should consider adding more schools to your AMCAS to boost your chances this cycle. Most applicants apply to 14-15 or more schools.
     
  31. seminolepremed

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    I am applying to about 13 schools.

    All MD programs in Florida : FIU, UM, USF, UCF, FAU, UF, FSU
    A few "reach" schools like Brown, Hopkins, Mount Sinai
    And one Caribbean school (University of Puerto Rico)
     
  32. n3xa

    n3xa "the anchor"
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    I thought PR schools were in the MSAR? :confused:
     
  33. isoquin

    isoquin Allopathetic
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    Agree with this a lot. You don't know what medicine is until you live it. If all you're doing in your clinical experience is staring at the hospital walls and zoning out, you're doing it wrong. If 12 hour clinic shifts make you crazy and you can't sit through a single surgery, you should consider how your own future career will be different.

    Keep something else in mind: this is not the end of your hoop-jumping. A lot of medicine is jumping through hoops, not because the hoops prove you to be a better/smarter student, but because the act of jumping through them shows that you're willing to go through the trouble.
     
  34. wholeheartedly

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    All Puerto Rico medical schools are considered US M.D. schools and are LCME accredited. They don't fall into the typical "caribbean" classification that gets referred to on SDN.
     
    #33 wholeheartedly, Jul 28, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2011
  35. SisterDisco08

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    It won't be the end of the world if you're a reapplicant. You put the ball in motion, so just see where it rolls. Definitely dive deeply into shadowing ASAP, but it's going to make it very hard to not seem like you're just "box-checking" requirements. If you do get interviews, be very prepared with an intelligent and good answer as to why you waited to do shadowing, etc. "I was busy graduating in three years" is not a good answer for this (trust me) because most schools will say "what was the rush?" instead of being impressed by it. In my experience, schools most appreciate my "saving money" answer.
     
  36. SeminoleVesicle

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    Maybe apply EDP to FSU? I believe their deadline is August 1st.
     
  37. NightGod

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    As mentioned before, this is not a Caribbean school in the traditional sense. Yes, it's located in the Caribbean, but it is still considered an US medical school.

    Very important question: you mention you're Cuban, but do you speak (and, more importantly, read and write) fluently? My ex-wife was raised by her grandmother from the DR who couldn't speak more than maybe 10 words of English, but it was VERY different from the Spanish she and her older sister (who later went to the Ponce Medical School) had to know to attend school when her family moved to PR the summer before her 8th grade year. She can carry on full conversations in Spanish and lived in PR for five years but still struggled a bit last year taking college-level Spanish courses.
     
  38. seminolepremed

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    Yes, I can read, write, and speak Spanish as fluently as in English.

    I'm sorry for the mix up. I wasn't applying to University of Puerto Rico until a few days ago and I didn't know it was still considered a US school.

    Also, will my AMCAS application not be verified until I take my MCAT? It's been a few weeks and nothing. :/

    All I've gotten is my Hopkins secondary.
     
  39. TriagePreMed

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    You will be rejected from University of Puerto Rico. They don't accept OOS applicants. This is on the MSAR.
     
  40. dmf2682

    Removed Rocket Scientist 2+ Year Member

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    If PR isn't a state how can anyone be OOS? :)
     
  41. seminolepremed

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    Not true,
    most are PR residents, however, I can still apply. Take a look at their website.



    Is it me, or is there a condescending vibe in these forums?
     
  42. LifeTake2

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    Yes, you can apply but you will be rejected. You have to be fluent in Spanish and have strong ties to the island to even be considered.

    As for tone, what you are feeling is that you ask for advice and then refuse to accept that you are making a mistake by applying at 20 w/o any clinical experience.

    It is not condescending, just frustration with someone that is so immature that you are making our point for us. :smack:
     
  43. n3xa

    n3xa "the anchor"
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    Your chance of acceptance is low unless you have strong ties to the island is probably the better way to word it.
     
  44. seminolepremed

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    I CANT DO ANYTHING ABOUT THE FACT THAT I ALREADY APPLIED. I'VE ALREADY PAID FOR THE APPLICATION AND I DO HAVE OTHER STRONG EC's. Why does it bother you so much? It has no impact on your life.

    Besides, You know ONE aspect of my application. With respect to that topic, it has already been answered... I said I was going to take a chance, BECAUSE AT THIS POINT I HAVE NO OTHER CHOICE, and because I personally believe I have some hope.


    You don't even know me to assess my maturity level, nor my capabilities.
    You're just bitter, or simply frustrated, like you said. Stop worrying about MY clinical experience and work on your common sense/manners, that should've developed in the 15 years you seem to have on me.
     
  45. seminolepremed

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    Yes, it is a better way to word it. Thanks.
     
  46. wholeheartedly

    Administrator 7+ Year Member

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    For the sake of clarity, here's the statement from U. of PR 's website:

    "Since the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine is a state supported institution, preference will be given to qualified applicants who are legal residents of Puerto Rico.

    Highly qualified Puerto Rico non-residents must demonstrate strong ties to Puerto Rico. To determine strong residential ties to Puerto Rico, the Committee on Admission will review the applicantĀ“s birthplace, high school attended, college attended and parentĀ“s legal residence. An applicant who meets three of the four categories demonstrates strong ties to Puerto Rico."


    So they do take certain non-residents and you might have a shot. Again it's a matter of weighing your odds and deciding if you want to spend money applying there.

    and yeah, I think some folks on here are taking a pretty blunt tone. However, those individuals use that tone with everyone so I wouldn't necessarily consider it condescending, just rather black and white thinking mixed with bit of frustration due to some folks perceiving you as asking for advice and then not seriously considering the points they are making. I'd like you make your own decisions in a way that's best for you based one what you know about yourself and what you can demonstrate to schools, but I'd like to see you successful too. I'm not in the "100% don't apply this year" camp, but I think it's risky. Some are more risk averse than others.

    That said, moving forward my suggestions (caveat that I'm not on an adcom and haven't applied yet) would be to start some sort of clinical experience ASAP, maybe if you could start back again at the cancer center it would seem more longitudinal. I'm hoping you're already planning on studying your tail off for the MCAT, and I'd really recommend doing practice interviews with someone experienced in interviewing people, preferably med students or other professionals. Tell them you want to make sure you're perceived as being mature since you're younger than average so they can give you advice accordingly. (*note i'm not saying you aren't mature as i don't know you, just that if you're concerned adcoms will be watching for it you want to be proactive. it'll make you more comfortable during interviews as well)


    The idea that many seem to agree with is that you can talk about being interested in medicine all you want. But if you can clearly show it without words, you're in significantly better position.

    Worst case scenario you don't get in this round, are out some cash, but have clear idea of what to improve for the next cycle.
     
    #45 wholeheartedly, Jul 29, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  47. TriagePreMed

    TriagePreMed Membership Revoked
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    Go to your MSAR. Click on "application deadlines and requirements" then where it says "Can applications from OOS applicants be accepted?" it literally reads "Can not be accepted."
     
  48. n3xa

    n3xa "the anchor"
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    Damn. I just saw that on the MSAR too. But hey, they send a secondary to everyone at least!

    Worst case scenario she's out 20 bucks. I wish all schools were this cheap.
     
  49. wholeheartedly

    Administrator 7+ Year Member

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    Folks, MSAR isn't always completely accurate. Use your MSAR but always double check with the school itself. Sometimes they use the info they submit to the MSAR to act as a screening device. University of PR's own website says they can if they meet 3 of the 4 strong ties criteria, as I copy and pasted above. She probably doesn't but it's worth noting.
     
    #48 wholeheartedly, Jul 30, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  50. LifeTake2

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    we know she doesn't, which is why she was told she won't get it.

    1) She states she was born in Cuba Cuba != Puerto Rico
    2) She is currently an UG student in Florida. Florida != Puerto Rico
    That is 2 of the four, thus she doesn't qualify for admission. There is nothing to discuss, how has this taken a dozen posts to clarify??
     
  51. LifeTake2

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    To clarify, you CAN do something about it. Why do you keep saying you have no other choice, is there a gun being held to your head?

    You state you aren't verified; which means you CAN withdraw your application and next year when you are ready you won't be a re-applicant to all the schools. In MY opinion this would be better than wasting the 1st look from each school this year while you continue to build your application.

    As for bothering me, it has no impact on my life. But you asked for opinions, then got pi$$ed when they were offered. This is a classic indicator of maturity that you can't accept criticism even when you asked for it.

    /signing off from thread
     

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