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6r Bio question

Discussion in 'MCAT: Medical College Admissions Test' started by sj786, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. sj786

    sj786 Member
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    how does glomerular filteration rate relate to the blood pressure?
     
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  3. instigata

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    When you increase blood pressure, you increase the filtration rate of the blood. This is because the blood is circulating faster, and the filtration rate increases to keep up with it. Hope this helps
     
  4. redsoxfan

    redsoxfan Senior Member
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    the way i like to think about it is that alot of blood pressure drugs are diuretics, ie make u pee. by ridding yourself of excess fluid, u reduce blood pressure.

    GFR has to do with how much fluid enters your kidneys. This is directly proportional to the amount of blood entering the renal artery, which of course is going to increase if u have additional fluid in your body.

    honestly, i learn everything backwards. i understand how a drug works and then relate that to how things are supposed to work. hope this helps..
     
  5. Surg Path

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    I like that answer. By inhibiting reabsorption of solutes, water reabsorption also decreases (most diuretics act this way I believe), causing fluid volume decrease and bp will drop.

    Another way to think about it: increasing pressure of fluid will increase the speed through small tubes (capillaries) and thus more blood will pass through glomerulus in a given time.

    I think thats all correct.
     

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