Luol Deng Fan

10+ Year Member
Mar 16, 2008
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CHITOWN, IL
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Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
From like age 38-55 you will enjoy a pharmacist way more than being in trades. Sure, the electrician may party a little more and drive a bmw before you but everything later on in life will suck more.
So in other words you will enjoy life when you have no desire to enjoy life anymore? I would rather blow money in my 20s and 30s. That's the time to live.
 
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stoichiometrist

7+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2011
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Don’t forget compound interest.

The electrician or software engineer can start earning a high salary at a young age with little or no debt. If you’re smart by not blowing it on parties and BMWs you can invest it for a 7% yearly return which allows for an earlier retirement.

The pharmacist graduates with $200k+ in debt at a much later age as their balance balloons at 6% yearly interest. You earn probably no more than the electrician or software engineers in terms of gross salary.
 

Rx1992

5+ Year Member
2+ Year Member
Jul 31, 2013
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Pre-Pharmacy
Lol you guys saying nps/pas are the future are clearly speaking out of your a**. Most patients still ask for the mds and dos and that will not stop. Truth is they are vastly under trained compared to us and make mistakes often, like dumbbbbb mistakes. I’m not worried. Most of my collegues average 300k after residency in primary care and our sky is definitely not falling like yalls and I think it’s getting better. The specialty I’m going into averages 600-800k after residency and I’m definitely happy with my decision. Med school cost me 150k, had no college debt, and am on track for paying it off during residency. Will be making bank and living the life I want; 4000+ square ft house, travel whenever I want wherever I want and but just about any car I want. Sure Med school was hell but it was worth it in my opinion. Truly feel bad for what pharmacy has become and give you all my sympathies.
Also I would like to add NPs and PAs are getting saturated like pharmacy. Truth is you cannot shorten the rigor of medicine. This is not engineering or business or law. Also I agree because np and pa cannot do differential diagnosis
 
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Rx1992

5+ Year Member
2+ Year Member
Jul 31, 2013
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Midlevels are not governed by the same residency restrictions as MDs and DOs. You can get a DNP online at some places these days.
But midlevels have a higher acceptance rate than Medicine and are getting saturated like pharmacy.
 

Rx1992

5+ Year Member
2+ Year Member
Jul 31, 2013
48
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Pre-Pharmacy
Well not everyone is fortunate to have a spouse fully support them through medical school and residency, so that's not a good comparison. Medicine is obviously still a good field, but not as cost effective as you make it to be. The average doctor takes years to break even. Isn't it common knowledge that many live paycheck to paycheck until their 40s?



No he's referring to actual vending machines like this. Of course they have their limits, like no controls, but they definitely cut down on overhead. One Rph probably oversees multiple machines.

Are you talking about practicing doctors or residents living paycheck to paycheck because that is more like new grad pharmDs. I know a family med resident who got four or five job offers with signing bonus in a suburban area, during his third year of residency. It’s not getting saturated anytime soon. Only certain specialities are getting saturated like Radiology but not Medicine as a whole. People pay good money to see a Doctor. Medicine has always been regulated by the AMA. The academic standards will continue to increase. Protecting Medicine. Most MDs have 80 to 90% match rate compared to Pharmacy at 60% match rate for residency. And residency in pharmacy is not needed for most specialities except for oncology and ID.
 
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Sep 12, 2010
3,145
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Attending Physician
PAs and NPs are already getting more pcol training than their medicine counterparts. Clinical pharmacists will still exist in 10 to 15 years but at a much lower salary. $50-60k a year is inevitable when you look at what they do (hell, what I used to do for what that's worth)
What's pcol?
 
Sep 12, 2010
3,145
1,045
181
Status
Attending Physician
I would be fine working for 20 USD an hour. That's my limit though. Below 20 and i'm going to walmart in the bay area to stock shelves. I know someone there so I can get 17 USD an hour no problem. And i get to listen to my podcasts there without having to deal with rude people and also get a pizza party if we have so many days without a major injury.
Why removed? I like modest anteater
 
Sep 12, 2010
3,145
1,045
181
Status
Attending Physician
Those are all in a bubble too.
And wait until automation hits accounting in a big way. My brother-in-law is a software engineer and his last gig was with an accounting firm and the higher-ups couldn't wait to sign-off on lay-offs of experienced accountants after his team was done with their project.

Whatever the case may be, it takes more than a degree and a lazy give-it-to-me attitude to make it these days.
Too many pharmacists went in with that attitude and suffered as a result.
It isn't the 50s or the 90s anymore.
Pharmacy is only two years if undergrad?
 

gwarm01

7+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2009
2,382
3,109
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Status
Pharmacist
He never trolled he was serious.
His van living comments can’t have been serious.
His style evolved over time. There were times that he laid it on way too thick and it came off as obvious trolling, although he still seemed to snag a few suckers. Eventually he found a way to express extreme opinions in a way that was just reasonable enough to not seem like trolling. It even felt like we saw a few genuine responses and opinions from him, although that may have just been me falling for his tricks.
 

lord999

Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Feb 20, 2002
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DC
Status
Pharmacist, Academic Administration
I was always told it was due to the Kaiser union pharmacists negotiating higher pay. The overall pharmacist job market had to shift to compete. The truth is probably more nuanced than that.
No, not Kaiser. It was mostly due to the son of the UAW union chief at Dearborn, MI being an absolutely incompetent pharmacist (told multiple times that he should find another line of work) and ended up as the CAPhA director. As CAPhA head, he negotiated CA using his experience with unions to have higher standards than the then NABPLEX and kept CA out of the reciprocity system for 20 years.

He did ok though, he was hired by Medco as a CEO, got it sold to Merck, but also negotiated behind Express Scripts back and "stole" the Tricare/TMA contract.