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Academic Fresh Start?

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by sloozy8, Dec 17, 2005.

  1. sloozy8

    sloozy8 New Member

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    Hi, I have a really unusual question. I started college in 1985. I goofed around for 3 years (I mean I seriously goofed around) and then in 1989, I got really serious and graduated with great grades. Fast forward to 2000. I graduated with a Masters degree again great grades.


    I have been teaching for 13 years and it's ok but it's not what I want to do when I grow up. I teach special education but I am ready to take the jump to complete what I feel I should do. I have been looking at pharmacy or the dental programs.

    Anyway getting to my question. In Texas, there is a program called Academic Fresh start. It basically wipes out everything you did in college that is older than 10 years. This would basically mean I would be starting over on pre req's and I guess it would mean that my Grad degree would be treated just as 48 hours of classes.

    Crazy you say? There is a program for UTHSCA for the dental school. It basically would be 3 years of undergrad and make the minimum required grades, pass the DAT and you are guaranteed a seat to the dental school.
    In addition, you would finish the whole program in 7 years and I would have picked up my B.S. and the DDS at the same time.

    I am thinking about this because the first school I had a 2.4 and quite a few F's (due to never coming to class) and at the second school. I literally flunked almost every semester I went (attendance again)

    When I graduated with my BA I had a 3.769 gpa and for my masters I had a 3.84 gpa. I Have no science pre-req's and I just took a college algebra and made an A. I was going to take a bio class to get my feet wet.

    Does anybody have any advice for me? And before anybody flames me for my poor grammar and typo. I am holding a sleeping 2 year old and I am typing with one hand.

    I just feel that my horrible start in college could serously hinder me but I am also much more mature than I was when I was 16. Being 16 in college is not a good recipe for success.

    I'm sorry for my long post but I have never been able to see anybody else with this type of question. And frankly I toyed with never even mentioning the second school since I either dropped everything or got F's in every class that I was signed up for. I think my gpa there is a .75. :scared:
     
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  3. Static Line

    Static Line America's Guard of Honor
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    I think you should apply to multiple programs, even the one that allows new beginings. You show a strong trend of improvemnt during your mature years. Which may be taken into consideration. Perhaps you won't be punished for your youthful indescretions. I am sure it would be nice not to take some of those classes again if you do not need to.
     
  4. ShyRem

    ShyRem I need more coffee.
    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Sounds like me! I went to college the first time in 1984, having just (JUST) turned 17. Didn't know why I went to college, didn't know what the heck I was doing there, didn't really want to be where I was. Failed an entire semester sophomore year, withdrew to figure out who I was and what I wanted. GPA: 1.75. Fast forward to 2001. Went back to school, graduated in 3 years cum laude with chem/math degrees. Unfortunately, my total GPA is still only a 3.23 according to AMCAS 'cuz they counted all those craptacular grades from 20 years ago. I'm not in Texas, tho, so I couldn't do the "fresh start", and I believe AMCAS will still require all your old grades even with a school-sponsored "fresh start" program.

    Good luck to you.
     
  5. Med-Man84

    Med-Man84 Junior Member
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    ^^ What if he doesn't report it ? AMCAS may have the perogative to demand transcripts of all colleges attended, and the OP has the perogative to get a sincere case of temporary amnesia.
     
  6. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member
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    Yeah, but then if he is accepted, and the info surfaces, the schools have the prerogative to withdraw an acceptance or throw him out for misstating his credentials, and subsequent licensing boards may have the prerogative for denying a license. Bear in mind that what can be checked on computer in terms of academic background checks may not be as limited a few years out. Not reporting is really not a good option, because you can easilly sink thousands into a hole and end up in a far worse position than if you took the longer route. (Not to mention the ethical irony of trying to unprofessionally sneak into a profession.)
     
  7. robh

    robh Senior Member
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    I agree completely with Law2Doc. Play it straight. Besides, the OP has a great case with the "I grew up" defense. Like others have said, the OP sounds like me. I had a 3.0 from my undergrad years only because of a strong close. Then I went on to do very well in graduate school as well as my career. I've been admitted to 4 medical schools so far this cycle. I don't know if dental school is more or less competitive than medical school but I think the OP has a great shot as is. Obviously doing excellent work on the post-bacc prereq's and the DAT or MCAT is a must.
     
  8. Beau Geste

    Beau Geste yah mo b there
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    IMHO, you really sounded lazy in your earlier academic career. Unfortunately you had that problem while you were IN MED SCHOOL (DO = MED SCHOOL). Your story is worded nicely with anecdotes and examples, but adcoms can and will see through it and get that you were not serious about being in medical school. It's good that you are an EMT and finished up with an engineering license. It's even better that you re-took your pre-reqs with As. To me, your application would need something more to prove yourself - shadowing, research, serious volunteer work, or something more another poster could suggest. A lot of people are rejected from the application process with A's and healthcare experience, especially if they were slackers in the recent past.

    Also, you stated you wanted to get into an MD school - honestly, how do you think they will react to your previous med school experience (again, DO = MED SCHOOL)? Most MD schools respect the DOs and their education.

    I know I am coming off harsh, but you really make yourself sound like you were "too good" or "too smart" for the DO degree. Who in their right mind gets into med school and doesn't study? Dropping names like Mensa and the high IQ society will not impress people if you can't do anything with your intelligence. You also mentioned being handed scholarship after scholarship and opportunity after opportunity but threw them away - what will make an adcom think that you won't do the same again?

    With the attitude that a DO title doesn't matter to you, and the bio you wrote, I don't think you have a very good chance. But then again, you asked for advice and I'm just giving you my honest opinion.

    Maybe efex, Q, exlawgirl or others might be able to give you better advice. Good luck.
     
  9. planningMD

    planningMD Member
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    nah, that is the type of answer i am searching for. thanks.

    at this point, us md / us do / img md ... i dont care. i want to be a family practice doctor. i want to do this a lot. i do not plan on applying for any scholarships. i dont feel very deserving of them anyways at this point.

    i guess in writing the stuff about mensa and opportunities, i was just trying to say how stupid i was. i guess i just feel im different. i guess also that i dont care a lot if others dont think i am, but i know i am, I KNOW IT. anyways, thanks for the comments, more things to consider.
     
  10. Beau Geste

    Beau Geste yah mo b there
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    You might have a better shot if you do more things to "up" your resume (like what I wrote before), but I was also thinking that if you are really serious about the MD, did you think about the Carribean schools? You will get an MD from them, and if you are interested in FP then you should be able to get a residency relatively easily. Since this is a pretty anonymous place, people will tend to give you the most raw honesty, so keep what you hear in the back of your mind. If you really have improved on the laziness, then you could get things to look competitive again. You also might want to get some professional to help with your essay and how to spin your failures into learning experiences.

    By the way, I was sort of the same way in high school (I was voted the biggest procrastinator of the class of 1994. They made the title up just for me since I would turn things in at the last minute or forget about a test, then ace it.). I had to step up my game in college though, because I found out very quickly that it takes more than intelligence, but hard work, too.
     
  11. ShyRem

    ShyRem I need more coffee.
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    My advice for planningMD: Go to your nearest medical school admissions dean, set up an appointment, and talk to them. They will give you the best idea of your chances. There is no penalty for this, no cost other than your time and travel costs. But I do feel that is your best bet for accurate information. We cannot give you the information you are looking for - all we can do is guess. Your situation is unique, and you need some expert advice.

    good luck.
     
  12. MollyMalone

    MollyMalone I'm a Score Quadruplet
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    Hey there,

    If you're interested in DDS you may be able to get better answers from the peeps over in the dental forums... you won't have to worry about AMCAS if you're not headed to medical school, but I'm not sure how the dental world handles retakes and I haven't seen a lot of dental people here in the nontrad forum.

    Best of luck to you! :luck:
     

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