PsyDStar

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Feb 23, 2005
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Greetings all,

I was wondering what anyone interested in sharing thought about the number of post-bacc programs to apply too. I am fresh out of undergrad at Binghamton University with a 3.785 (with a BA in Psyc). I did not utilize my time well in terms of research with faculty outside of classes (basically 0). I took a B in a critical class: Research Methods. I also have Calc I from UVM where I transfered from after 1 year as well as Chem I (both are B- though). Basically what is happening is the PsyD program I applied for (yes, the insane and unheard of "all eggs in one basket manuver") wait-listed me and instead of sitting on my bum like well... you know ;-) I have decided to seek my MD and specialize in Psychiatry or Neurology or related area (unless something else captures my attention in the process).

Also, not alot of health related work experience but 1 year of volunteer work as a crisis counselor.

I have picked out 5 schools to get the pre-med requirements out of the way... Columbia, NYU, Temple, Drexel, UPenn... should I apply to all of them? One of them? Find more? Any advice is deeply appreciated.

Thnaks,
PsyDStar
 

Pemulis

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May 6, 2004
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Next door to Nibbles Woodaway
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None of the programs you listed are that hard to get into. Even Columbia and Penn aren't that tough, if you have over say a 3.2...it's STAYING in that's hard at those programs. I'd say that if you're sure those are the programs you're interested in, pick 2 or 3 you like most and apply to them.

Since I noticed you're new to the board, I'll go ahead though and give you my .02. You can take your pre-med courses anywhere (like Binghamton, for instance), not just at a "formal" post-bac program. There are some formal post-bac programs that do offer significant advantages over just registering somewhere and "doing it yourself". But the ones you listed aren't among them (except maybe for Drexel if you're working full-time and want an evening option). If you go to Columbia, for instance, you'll spend a small fortune just to sit in on the same huge freshman chemistry classes that undergrads are taking. If you're going to do that, you might as well stay at Binghamton and save a lot of money. If you want the structured format of a more formalized program, check out some of the smaller, more competitive ones; with your gpa you should be a strong applicant at those. Programs that fit this category include Bryn Mawr, Goucher, Scripps, Mills, and Johns Hopkins, to name a few. Search around on this board for more info.
 

sidewalkman

15+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2004
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Pretty much echoing what Pemulis said. I guarantee you will get into Penn, Temple, and Drexel given your GPA and the ability to write a half-decent essay. Apply to one or two of these, another one or two that are more difficult to get into (Bryn Mawr, Goucher, etc.), and you'll be fine.