Aug 24, 2015
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Hello everybody! i'm interested in becoming a Surgeon and traveling the world in order to help the less fortunate. I'm 15 and i'm about to enter Ninth Grade, does anyone have any advice in order to further set me on that path. Other than the obvious ie Get good grades, try to get a Scholarship, ect it would be appreciated. :D
 

md-2020

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Hello everybody! i'm interested in becoming a Surgeon and traveling the world in order to help the less fortunate. I'm 15 and i'm about to enter Ninth Grade, does anyone have any advice in order to further set me on that path. Other than the obvious ie Get good grades, try to get a Scholarship, ect it would be appreciated. :D
Relax and enjoy your life. Join a sport. Go out on weekends. Ask your dream guy/girl to homecoming.


Starting to worry about "becoming a surgeon" when entering high school will do you no favors.
 
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Firaxxa
Aug 24, 2015
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Relax and enjoy your life. Join a sport. Go out on weekends. Ask your dream guy/girl to homecoming.


Starting to worry about "becoming a surgeon" when entering high school will do you no favors.
I was hoping there was something i could do early to further push me into the direction of a becoming a surgeon.
 

md-2020

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I was hoping there was something i could do early to further push me into the direction of a becoming a surgeon.
The best thing you can do in the next 4 years is have a good time in HS and get into a good college, if possible.
 
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hopefulERdoc251

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Hello everybody! i'm interested in becoming a Surgeon and traveling the world in order to help the less fortunate. I'm 15 and i'm about to enter Ninth Grade, does anyone have any advice in order to further set me on that path. Other than the obvious ie Get good grades, try to get a Scholarship, ect it would be appreciated. :D
Honestly, as a person that was in a very similar situation as you, enjoy your time and open yourself up to any possibility of career path. I remember I was so focused on getting into medical school the first two years of undergrad that I sort of lost focus on the important things in life. That changed when I found my passion for Neuroscience/Public Health/Art. In HS, I HATED art and the social sciences, but after taking a few courses in undergrad, I LOVED IT. If I were you, focus on getting good grades/SAT score and once you're in college, take courses in college for the hell of it (Obviously take your prereqs and upper sciences if that's what you're interested in). Engage in medical and non-medical experiences. You'd be surprised as to how much those non-medical volunteering opportunities allow you to grow as a person and show your personality as being something more than a hellbent pre-med that wants to go to medical school. Be open to the possibilities life has to offer, be flexible, and whatever you do, give it your all and you will get the most out of it
 
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Firaxxa
Aug 24, 2015
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Pre-Medical
Honestly, as a person that was in a very similar situation as you, enjoy your time and open yourself up to any possibility of career path. I remember I was so focused on getting into medical school the first two years of undergrad that I sort of lost focus on the important things in life. That changed when I found my passion for Neuroscience/Public Health/Art. In HS, I HATED art and the social sciences, but after taking a few courses in undergrad, I LOVED IT. If I were you, focus on getting good grades/SAT score and once you're in college, take courses in college for the hell of it (Obviously take your prereqs and upper sciences if that's what you're interested in). Engage in medical and non-medical experiences. You'd be surprised as to how much those non-medical volunteering opportunities allow you to grow as a person and show your personality as being something more than a hellbent pre-med that wants to go to medical school. Be open to the possibilities life has to offer, be flexible, and whatever you do, give it your all and you will get the most out of it
Ok thank you for the advice :D
 
Mar 1, 2015
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I'm also 15 and about to enter the 10th grade. I was also obsessed with the idea of being a doctor. I have come to realize that you should just enjoy your time right now while you still have it, because in UG + med school you will be working your ass off. For now, just get good grades, and don't get arrested.
 

jqueb29

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Hello everybody! i'm interested in becoming a Surgeon and traveling the world in order to help the less fortunate. I'm 15 and i'm about to enter Ninth Grade, does anyone have any advice in order to further set me on that path. Other than the obvious ie Get good grades, try to get a Scholarship, ect it would be appreciated. :D
Here's my plan for what I would do if I were you:

1. Go to high school
2. Have fun
3. Go to college
4. Have even more fun
5. Go to med school
6. Become as involved as you want in your school's Surgery Interest Club AFTER you pass your first couple med school tests
 
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Aug 30, 2015
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Hello everybody! i'm interested in becoming a Surgeon and traveling the world in order to help the less fortunate. I'm 15 and i'm about to enter Ninth Grade, does anyone have any advice in order to further set me on that path. Other than the obvious ie Get good grades, try to get a Scholarship, ect it would be appreciated. :D
I made an account here just to reply to you. This is what I would have told myself if I was in your position back when I was starting high school. First, you have the interest in becoming a surgeon which means u have an idea of what u want to study after graduating. That sets you ahead of many others who graduate and don't know what to do, which includes me. Congratulations!
Now here are my tips which I wish I had known better:

- If in the future you decide to start at a Community College let me tell you that nobody cares about your grades in High School UNLESS you're trying to get a scholarship. So if you want a scholarship try to achieve a good GPA for that.
- But here is what EVERYBODY (community colleges and universities) cares about: your KNOWLEDGE. You can get bad grades on your science classes because your teacher's way of grading sucks or for whatever other reason and universities know that. But if instead of just trying to get a good grade by memorizing stuff or cheating or whatever you actually pay attention to LEARNING, you'll be able to use your knowledge to save a lot of time. How? Some universities and definitely community colleges allow u to take placement tests for classes like chemistry and other sciences. If you do well on the tests you can skip classes and jump forward even if you had a bad grade in high school. Saving yourself a class means saving yourself a whole semester. Trust me, you want to do that to to finish school faster, to have less debt and start working asap.
- I got good grades in high school but I focused on the grades and not really in learning. So when I graduated I had forgotten most of what I had learned and that dint help me because instead of being able to take placement tests for some sciences I have to actually take the classes which is making my career longer.
- So if you have a bad teacher or when you simply don't understand something in your bio class, your math class, your chem class or any other science (since it's what you mostly need to become a surgeon) go on the Internet, on YouTube or whatever and to try to LEARN.
- if you forget everything you learned a semester ago is because you were focusing on memorizing or not focusing at all. If you focus on learning that will stick in your brain. Be curious, study to learn about the world you live in, and you'll do great in life.
- Yes have fun like others said and enjoy being a teenager but you know what? You don't need to compromise your grades to have fun. I used to go to a lot of parties in hs, and used to hang out with people a lot but I still got good grades. How? By organizing my time and setting priorities (things that I learned to do thanks to the internet haha). I started scheduling times to study and setting aside times to have fun In high school and now I've become better. I still have lots of fun in college and my GPA is still strong.

TL;DR? LEARN instead of memorizing, be curious and schedule your time to study but also to have fun. That will take you far in life.

Congratulations too on having the incentive to ask about your future and care about what you want to do. Keep that attitude and you'll do great in life.
 
G

gunnerdoc

1. Get into a good university that'll give you money for going there.
2. Don't get in trouble with the law. Don't fail any classes.
3. Enjoy yourself. You're in HS. There's really not much you can do at 15 that'll impact whether or not you become a surgeon. Go outside, go on a vacation, have fun with your friends, figure out young love. You won't have the time later to do so.
 

Glazedonutlove

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Hello everybody! i'm interested in becoming a Surgeon and traveling the world in order to help the less fortunate. I'm 15 and i'm about to enter Ninth Grade, does anyone have any advice in order to further set me on that path. Other than the obvious ie Get good grades, try to get a Scholarship, ect it would be appreciated. :D
Try volunteering in hospitals, get good grades/act/sat, and get into a decent 4 year college

Concur with others - enjoy your hs years!
 

Icositetrachoron

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BS/MD route is open if your academics are excellent. Start doing ECs (hospital volunteering, hospice, e.g.) if you're SERIOUS about going into medicine. Personally, it's better to smell the flowers - high school only happens once. My biggest regret as a senior was being too afraid to do more. Join a sport or a couple of clubs. Have some fun. This is supposed to be the best time of your life, whether or not it seems like it.
 

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BS/MD route is open if your academics are excellent. Start doing ECs (hospital volunteering, hospice, e.g.) if you're SERIOUS about going into medicine. Personally, it's better to smell the flowers - high school only happens once. My biggest regret as a senior was being too afraid to do more. Join a sport or a couple of clubs. Have some fun. This is supposed to be the best time of your life, whether or not it seems like it.
I would say DONT do a BS/MD. There's no reason to put yourself on a med school path earlier. As you said "it's better to smell the flowers" -- COLLEGE only happens once (unless you screw up) and that's going to be an opportunity to have a lot more fun than high school. Just saying.
 

Glazedonutlove

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I would say DONT do a BS/MD. There's no reason to put yourself on a med school path earlier. As you said "it's better to smell the flowers" -- COLLEGE only happens once (unless you screw up) and that's going to be an opportunity to have a lot more fun than high school. Just saying.
But with bs/md you would have a lot more fun in college if you knew you were already confirmed to attend a medical school right after. None of that premed stress, and sometimes they don't require an mcat
 

Law2Doc

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But with bs/md you would have a lot more fun in college if you knew you were already confirmed to attend a medical school right after. None of that premed stress, and sometimes they don't require an mcat
No way. You are locked into a course of study and in many cases need to maintain a certain GPA. Far more premed stress but it's just not about MCAT. Plus if you already have the "I'm in med school" mindset, you most likely won't explore other things, which is part of what makes college such an opportunity. Take classes you enjoy, and decide as late as possible in the game to apply to med school. It will always be there and most of the time you'll end up with much better options.
 
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mimelim

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But with bs/md you would have a lot more fun in college if you knew you were already confirmed to attend a medical school right after. None of that premed stress, and sometimes they don't require an mcat
Not even close. If you think that pre-med is too stressful to have fun, you should consider doing something else because it only gets busier and more stressful. Sorry! :p
 
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md-2020

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Not even close. If you think that pre-med is too stressful to have fun, you should consider doing something else because it only gets busier and more stressful. Sorry! :p
Pre-med is fine.

Is it the best? No. But you know what sucks more?

Not knowing whether you'll have a job after you graduate, in any other field.
 
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Glazedonutlove

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Not even close. If you think that pre-med is too stressful to have fun, you should consider doing something else because it only gets busier and more stressful. Sorry! :p
Premed is not that stressful. I'm talking about having security about knowing you have a spot in med school
 

Glazedonutlove

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No way. You are locked into a course of study and in many cases need to maintain a certain GPA. Far more premed stress but it's just not about MCAT. Plus if you already have the "I'm in med school" mindset, you most likely won't explore other things, which is part of what makes college such an opportunity. Take classes you enjoy, and decide as late as possible in the game to apply to med school. It will always be there and most of the time you'll end up with much better options.
I know I wouldn't miss spending 1000s this interview cycle :)
 

md-2020

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I'm talking about having security about knowing you have a spot in med school
If I were a high achieving student that matriculated BS/MD I'd always be thinking about what I gave up (much better UG, freedom to choose medical school, scholarships, etc etc). It'd be a nightmare.
 
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Glazedonutlove

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If I were a high achieving student that matriculated BS/MD I'd always be thinking about what I gave up (much better UG, freedom to choose medical school, scholarships, etc etc). It'd be a nightmare.
Never said there aren't 2 sides to it. Depends on what you want as an individual. I agree with you, I would miss seeing all these great schools and programs if I was bound to one place. But some people know they want to live in a certain place and it may be a good option for them.
 
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Law2Doc

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Premed is not that stressful. I'm talking about having security about knowing you have a spot in med school
If you are smart enough to get into and not get dumped from a combined program you'll still be smart enough to get into a med school after a normal college. You are likely trading one set of stresses for another and throwing away a ton of opportunity to boot. These programs have gradually become less and less in favor over the years and honestly if the primary reason you're picking it is security then you'd probably be exactly the person who might benefit more by NOT doing it -- med school and training is a really rough place for people that don't have the stomach for a good uphill challenge and want an easier path. while I've met people who did well coming from these joint degrees, they weren't the kind of people looking to avoid hurdles later in their careers and I suspect they wouldn't have endorsed the path just for those looking to avoid stress of applications or mcat. It's not the kind of career that you should go into if you fear stresses and hard work.
 

Glazedonutlove

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If you are smart enough to get into and not get dumped from a combined program you'll still be smart enough to get into a med school after a normal college. You are likely trading one set of stresses for another and throwing away a ton of opportunity to boot. These programs have gradually become less and less in favor over the years and honestly if the primary reason you're picking it is security then you'd probably be exactly the person who might benefit more by NOT doing it -- med school and training is a really rough place for people that don't have the stomach for a good uphill challenge and want an easier path. while I've met people who did well coming from these joint degrees, they weren't the kind of people looking to avoid hurdles later in their careers and I suspect they wouldn't have endorsed the path just for those looking to avoid stress of applications or mcat. It's not the kind of career that you should go into if you fear stresses and hard work.
Haha I did not do the combined program and I agree with md2020 and you about missing out on so many great opportunities. Currently getting to travel and see all these schools and I wouldn't trade it for the combined program :)
 

efle

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If I were a high achieving student that matriculated BS/MD I'd always be thinking about what I gave up (much better UG, freedom to choose medical school, scholarships, etc etc). It'd be a nightmare.
But places like WashU, Northwestern, and Rice have BS/MD programs, and these programs are usually non-binding so you can still choose to apply elsewhere. All that these programs do is give you a guaranteed excellent option, the experience you actually have as a student need not be any different than all the other premeds
 

GrapesofRath

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I'll add there are a number of BS/MD programs that also have their students maintain fairly high standards in college just to keep that guaranteed acceptance. At Pitt, you need a 3.75 sGPA at a competitive school with tons of smart pre-meds in large part from what the Pitt medicine name attracts. At WASHU, you need an absurd 3.8/36 to get in. At Northwestern, I believe you also need to hit a certain sGPA at what is one of the most rigorous and competitive undergrad institutions in the country. Even for BS/MD programs at lower tier programs, I've definitely heard of a number having to maintain certain GPAs or MCATs in college which aren't just a joke to do.
 
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md-2020

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But places like WashU, Northwestern, and Rice have BS/MD programs, and these programs are usually non-binding so you can still choose to apply elsewhere. All that these programs do is give you a guaranteed excellent option, the experience you actually have as a student need not be any different than all the other premeds
The people getting into these places are often weighing HYPSM offers as well. As we both know top schools give great fin aid, so chances are HYPSM costs less. In that scenario I'd rather be at a big boy than say, Rice.

At NU I believe the HPME standards are 3.6/3.2 for all pre-med pre-reqs, a number which is far from "guaranteed." A bit easier, sure, but not one that would be worth the cost by any stretch.
 

efle

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The people getting into these places are often weighing HYPSM offers as well. As we both know top schools give great fin aid, so chances are HYPSM costs less. In that scenario I'd rather be at a big boy than say, Rice.

At NU I believe the HPME standards are 3.6/3.2 for all pre-med pre-reqs, a number which is far from "guaranteed." A bit easier, sure, but not one that would be worth the cost by any stretch.
I doubt there's a big price difference between ranks 1-5 vs 5-teens but can't look at the us news numbers to check! The GPA/MCAT requirements are far from guarunteed but are about what you'd need anyways to seriously have a shot at any superior/equal MD alternatives. So like I said going through as premed w/ assured acceptance vs normal premed seems to have a clear pro if you do well and no real con (except being at such a lowly undergrad as Brown or Northwestern or Wustl instead of HYP :p)
 

Mad Jack

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Seriously, here's the deal- enjoy yourself. Nothing you do now will realistically affect whether you become a surgeon or not. If you get into a good school, it might help your application a bit, but only if you subsequently excel at that good school. If you go to an average state school, you'll still be able to get into medical school and become a surgeon. So just enjoy your life. You're 6-7 years from even applying, and you'll change a lot between now and then. I mean, look at how different you were seven years ago to how you are now- A LOT will change. The person you are now will be almost unrecognizable to your future self. Don't obsess over your future, enjoy the present, because you'll never get to enjoy it again, and once you're in med school, it's not nearly as magical as you think, nor is being a physician some wonderful, all-encompasing passion that leads to fulfillment for most doctors.
 
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md-2020

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So like I said going through as premed w/ assured acceptance vs normal premed seems to have a clear pro if you do well and no real con (except being at such a lowly undergrad as Brown or Northwestern or Wustl instead of HYP :p)
Agreed. Having visited NU and having always been a fan of Brown, I can attest to the fact that personally, I'd go to those BS/MD programs in the blink of an eye. But the "relief" from the pre-med stress may be smaller than you think (except Brown lol).

NU, despite having a $10 billion endowment, does give poor need-based aid though; so for someone that finds cost to be a make or break factor, this would be something to note. They have a disproportionate amount of uber-elite kids. Best friend who went there said a running joke on campus is that half the student body couldn't even afford Ferraris.

Never been to WUSTL, but heard the campus is sweet. Campus is very important to me.
 
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