American College of Cardiology's new president is a....nurse?

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MDapplicant578124

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Make it make sense. Is this just not a desirable position that no cardiologist wants?

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The ACC is not a physician-only organization.

The world is a target-rich environment of serious problems. This isn't one of them.
That doesn't really make much sense. A law firm isn't a lawyer only organization, but should the managing partners be paralegals or lawyers? A surgical private practice isn't a physician only organization, but should the equity partners be surgeons or scrub techs?

It doesn't have to be physician only to be better led by someone that is an expert in the field. It was founded by 13 cardiologists, not nurses or executives.

This is part of the core problem of less and less physicians being in leadership positions, which is more than likely the fault of physicians more than anyone else. But the result has not been positive. I don't think I've ever met an older doc who says things are better today answering to MBA's than they were back when things were physician led...

What might be true is that this position has no real influence and no one actually wants it, in which case it makes more sense. I'm not familiar with the political intricacies of the organization.
 
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That doesn't really make much sense. A law firm isn't a lawyer only organization, but should the managing partners be paralegals or lawyers? A surgical private practice isn't a physician only organization, but should the equity partners be surgeons or scrub techs?
Poor analogy. Law firms and private surgical practices are businesses with corporate hierarchies. A professional society is a club with voluntary membership, and clubs usually elect their own leaders on a rotating basis.

I'm not familiar with the political intricacies of the organization.
No argument here.
 
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That doesn't really make much sense. A law firm isn't a lawyer only organization, but should the managing partners be paralegals or lawyers? A surgical private practice isn't a physician only organization, but should the equity partners be surgeons or scrub techs?

It doesn't have to be physician only to be better led by someone that is an expert in the field. It was founded by 13 cardiologists, not nurses or executives.

This is part of the core problem of less and less physicians being in leadership positions, which is more than likely the fault of physicians more than anyone else. But the result has not been positive. I don't think I've ever met an older doc who says things are better today answering to MBA's than they were back when things were physician led...

What might be true is that this position has no real influence and no one actually wants it, in which case it makes more sense. I'm not familiar with the political intricacies of the organization.

I love how nurses should only get the undesirable positions.

What makes you think nurses cannot lead?

I used to work for a major academic medical center with several top residency programs - and the president was a nurse.
 
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Despite the optics, may be a good move in the end. She appears to have quite a bit of executive experience and has already been the group’s VP so she knows the organization. She’s already the CEO of a large group of cardiology practices, so this doesn’t seem like a big leap.

I know in my professional organizations we’ve had some hits and misses with our leadership over the last few years. Being a well known physician doesn’t always come with the skill set to lead a big national organization effectively.
 
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Poor analogy. Law firms and private surgical practices are businesses with corporate hierarchies. A professional society is a club with voluntary membership, and clubs usually elect their own leaders on a rotating basis.


No argument here.
I think 150 million in revenue graduates it from being simply a "club"

It does look like she has management experience but there's 0 information about the company she is CEO for online so it's hard to evaluate if it's just resume fluff.

I would imagine having actual cardiology clinical experience has some sort of value but I guess not
 
I think 150 million in revenue graduates it from being simply a "club"
Club
Noun
An association or organization dedicated to a particular interest or activity.

It does look like she has management experience but there's 0 information about the company she is CEO for online so it's hard to evaluate if it's just resume fluff.

I would imagine having actual cardiology clinical experience has some sort of value but I guess not
It looks like someone woke up on the wrong side of the bed.
 
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The largest Visiting Nurses Association in my state is run by a physician.
 
Despite the optics, may be a good move in the end. She appears to have quite a bit of executive experience and has already been the group’s VP so she knows the organization. She’s already the CEO of a large group of cardiology practices, so this doesn’t seem like a big leap.

I know in my professional organizations we’ve had some hits and misses with our leadership over the last few years. Being a well known physician doesn’t always come with the skill set to lead a big national organization effectively.
Yep. Clinical/research acumen doesn't always translate to good leadership and management skills and vice versa.
 
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"The American College of Cardiology (ACC), a 39,000-member nonprofit medical society, is dedicated to enhancing the lives of cardiovascular patients through continuous quality improvement, patient-centered care, payment innovation and professionalism. Comprised of physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists and practice managers, the College bestows credentials upon cardiovascular specialists who meet its stringent qualifications. Above all, the ACC’s commitment to its members and their patients has driven the College to be a leader in the formulation of health policy, standards and guidelines, and a steadfast supporter of cardiovascular research. The ACC provides professional education and operates national registries for the measurement and improvement of quality care."

I don't see the issue with an RN leading the group if it's a multidisciplinary group. Especially since in their mission statement it's clear that it's 1) multidisciplinary and 2) not a cardiologist advocacy group (as might be suggested if they were named the "American College of Cardiologists.")

In PM&R, one of our primary sub-specialty professional groups for spinal cord injury medicine (ASCIP) is the same--it's full of physicians, RNs, PTs, OTs, SLPs, MSWs, etc. It's president the next year is a PT.

I've found ASCIP's meetings actually far more fun, interesting, and informative than physician-only conferences I've been to...
 
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"The American College of Cardiology (ACC), a 39,000-member nonprofit medical society, is dedicated to enhancing the lives of cardiovascular patients through continuous quality improvement, patient-centered care, payment innovation and professionalism. Comprised of physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists and practice managers, the College bestows credentials upon cardiovascular specialists who meet its stringent qualifications. Above all, the ACC’s commitment to its members and their patients has driven the College to be a leader in the formulation of health policy, standards and guidelines, and a steadfast supporter of cardiovascular research. The ACC provides professional education and operates national registries for the measurement and improvement of quality care."

I don't see the issue with an RN leading the group if it's a multidisciplinary group. Especially since in their mission statement it's clear that it's 1) multidisciplinary and 2) not a cardiologist advocacy group (as might be suggested if they were named the "American College of Cardiologists.")

In PM&R, one of our primary sub-specialty professional groups for spinal cord injury medicine (ASCIP) is the same--it's full of physicians, RNs, PTs, OTs, SLPs, MSWs, etc. It's president the next year is a PT.

I've found ASCIP's meetings actually far more fun, interesting, and informative than physician-only conferences I've been to...
ACRM is another multidisciplinary group in PM&R.
 
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