1. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice

Any chance?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by HelterSkelter, Nov 25, 2002.

  1. HelterSkelter

    HelterSkelter New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I always wanted to go to medical school but since the end of high school gave up on it since I couldn't sit and study for more than a few minutes at a time and I knew that wouldn't get me anywhere.

    Now, I have matured and am willing to do what it takes to get in but my undergraduate marks are so horrid I couldn't even stand the sight of them - let alone a medical school admissions officer. I have an undergrad degree (bachelor of science majored in computer science).

    What I want to know is if there is any way to wipe the slate clean and start fresh. Maybe starting a new undergrad degree? Any help is greatly appreciated.

    G
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. hey sorry when u submit ur amcas u have to enter all ur undergardutes courses and grades, so u will still be affected. what exactly is ur gpa cos some schools take into consideration ur major.

    ur best best is to enroll in a post bac. , masters or PhD program, which ever one u chose all hope is not lost. good luck!
     
  4. Ubu

    Ubu Always hungry...
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2002
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    HelterSkelter,

    If you are positive that med school is what you want to do, and you are willing to put in the energy and dedication that you didn't have before, there are many ways of improving your record. For starters, you can take post-bacc classes (should be upper division science courses). If you do a search on this website under post-bacc, I'm sure there is a lot of information about this as the subject has been discussed over and over again. You can also consider doing a masters, although I've heard that doing a post-bacc would be better. On the sad side, there is no way you can start with a clean slate.
     
  5. Paiger Pie

    Paiger Pie Schizznitz McGee
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2002
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    What if you just omitted your first college experience from your application. How could the possibly check? Provided you didn't apply to your first schools medschool, their isn't really any way they could check...or is there?
     
  6. johnlin

    johnlin Junior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2002
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Texas?

    Texas-Austin???
     
  7. Adcadet

    Adcadet Long way from Gate 27
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Messages:
    2,155
    Likes Received:
    11
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I'm doing an MPH, partially to make up for a less-than stallar undergrad GPA (about 3.3). Assuming your undergrad GPA is indeed horrible (<3.0), I would only consider a master's program that will let you take all of your premed classes - a year of bio (or so), a year of general chem, a year of organic, maybe a semester of biochem, a year of English, and some humanities (if you need them). I really doubt there are any that will let you take this many premed classes. So a post-bac may be the way to go.


    As I see it, this is the breakdown for post-bac vs. MS vs. MPH:

    Postbac - good if you need lots of premed classes and need to raise your GPA a lot, good if you need structure, and good if like the idea of being in a program that will guarontee you admissions to an affiliated medical school. Bad if you need a guaronteed job after finishing, and bad if you need a current source of income (since post-bacs usually don't come with a graduate assistantship).

    MS (in a "hard science") - good if you need some premed classes and to raise your GPA some. Good if you want to find monetary support during your program (in the form of a graduate assistantship), and good if you want to be prepared for a well-paying job after graduating. Good if you want to do research in a hard science.

    MPH (Master's fo Public Health) - good if you need to take a few premed classes and need to raise your GPA a little. Good if you need monetary support during your training (in the form of graduate assistantship). OK if you need a job after graduation (people with an MPH get paid decently, but often less than those with an MS due to the PUBLIC in MPH). Good if you like public health and population-based medicine. Good if you want to do public health research.
     
  8. Adcadet

    Adcadet Long way from Gate 27
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Messages:
    2,155
    Likes Received:
    11
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
  9. Ubu

    Ubu Always hungry...
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2002
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't know anything about the fresh start program in Texas, but you can't hide your undergrad GPA from the admission committee since they require official transcripts from all the schools you have attended.
     
  10. Dr.No728

    Dr.No728 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2002
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    "On the sad side, there is no way you can start with a clean slate. "

    Well. . . .I think it depends b/c if the person is going to start over with a new BS and don't wish to transfer ANY of the classes from the old degree, then you could get away with it. BUT this would mean relinquishing your general ed classes too which account for like 2 years of college. BUT-- if these grades would hold you back, you are better off not transferring them anyways.

    just another perspective :D :D :D from my devious side!!
     

Share This Page