yobynaes

10+ Year Member
May 26, 2006
296
3
Seattle
Status
Attending Physician
well, basically, i got these pamphlets from navy offering full tuition coverage for med school. Anyone had experiences with that? pros/cons? how would that limit my choice of residency and later career.

any comments are appreciated. :thumbup:
 

sentrosi

INTARWEB USER
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2004
290
1
TEH INTARWEB
Status
Medical Student
Yes. I'm kind of interested in this too. I really don't know that much about it. Like what you have to do during med school for it and what you have to put in after. And how it affects your future specialty and so on.
 

veighnkman

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2006
21
1
Northeast
Status
Resident [Any Field]
yobynaes said:
well, basically, i got these pamphlets from navy offering full tuition coverage for med school. Anyone had experiences with that? pros/cons? how would that limit my choice of residency and later career.

any comments are appreciated.
I looked into doing the Army version of the program; basically, they're all running the same scholarship (Health Professions Scholarship Program, HPSP). I spoke to recruiters from a couple of branches and even went as far as flying to a medical center (generously paid for by the USArmy) for a tour.

The big question is- do you want to be a military doc for the rest of your life? When you sign that paper, you are committing a significant part of your life to the military, and they don't give take-back-sies if you change your mind. If you don't do what they tell you and go where they tell you, it's a felony and possibly the end of your medical career.

Check very thoroughly into the commitment requirements, too. The recruits to whom I spoke were ambiguous and unclear... I thought it was 1for1 at first, but I left with the impression that after I complete residency I would somehow owe them 8 years...

With that said, the residents to whom I spoke said they enjoyed their experience and that being in the Army significantly helped with their leadership skills. They also have the obvious benefit of leaving med school not only debt free but with a little money in your pocket. However, the residents also told me that you're practically guaranteed to spend at least one 6 month stint in a current war-zone (Iraq) as soon as you pass USMLE III.

If being in the military is one of your goals in life, then go for it. Otherwise, I say the money alone is not worth the commitment.
 
About the Ads

sentrosi

INTARWEB USER
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2004
290
1
TEH INTARWEB
Status
Medical Student
Damn...I thought it was 1 for 1 too. Do most people stay in the military after their commitment is over? Is it hard to get civilian physician jobs after leaving the military?
 

SanDiegoSOD

Milk was a bad choice
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2004
2,794
10
Sunny California
Status
Don't do it for the money. As far as $$$ goes, in the long run, the scholarship is a money-losing proposition, as you will make far more in the private sector as a practicing physician than in the military.
There are many, many reasons to serve in the military, but base such a decision on other factors than this scholarship.
 

newguy357

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 27, 2005
283
0
Status
sentrosi said:
Damn...I thought it was 1 for 1 too. Do most people stay in the military after their commitment is over? Is it hard to get civilian physician jobs after leaving the military?
It is 1 for 1. Pretty much every contract when you join the military is for eight years though. What it means is that you are committed to active duty for four years--but then for the four years after that (to add up to 8 years total) while you are not "in the military" any more, i.e. you have the freedoms of a civilian, you can still be called up if the military is desperate for your talent. The second four years is called IRR ("inactive ready reserve" I think). I have no idea how common it is for a medical officer to get called up during that time. Others in the military medicine forum might have a better idea.
 
OP
Y

yobynaes

10+ Year Member
May 26, 2006
296
3
Seattle
Status
Attending Physician
newguy357 said:
It is 1 for 1. Pretty much every contract when you join the military is for eight years though. What it means is that you are committed to active duty for four years--but then for the four years after that (to add up to 8 years total) while you are not "in the military" any more, i.e. you have the freedoms of a civilian, you can still be called up if the military is desperate for your talent. The second four years is called IRR ("inactive ready reserve" I think). I have no idea how common it is for a medical officer to get called up during that time. Others in the military medicine forum might have a better idea.
yeah, i got the pt, guys :scared: though i can use a free travel/tour. :laugh:
hehe, thanks :thumbup:
 
About the Ads