Being in debt vs. going through military?

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xnfs93hy

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I know it is NOT about the $$$ and I KNOW I should NOT be worried about this know but I am, so I'll give it a shot.

Granted I can get into medical school in 6 years (probably will, idk yet though, gotta see how I do in college), how will I pay for it?

I mean, my parents can pay for college but after that it is all me. I am just afraid that I will be 400,000 in debt and not be able to pay it off for years and years.

I thought about the military but then I though "Well...I'd rather be in debt than owe four years of my life to the military making next to nothing. I know I would be a resident after medical school and that is still crap money but at least I will only have to do it for 3-7 years as opposed to 11 through the military (I am guessing 7 years residencies are the longest? idk..). With a residency that long I think most of my debt SHOULD be paid off and then I'll start at a HUGE salary and just start from the ground up.

I KNOW I SHOULD NOT BE WORRIED. But as it stands unless my parents or myself wins the lottery, then I will still need to fund professional school by myself. Thoughts on this...?
 

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I know it is NOT about the $$$ and I KNOW I should NOT be worried about this know but I am,

Debt is one financial thing you should be concerned about as a student, it is a good thing to be conscious of.

Thoughts on this...?

The most common way of financing med school is through loans. Not a fun option, but that is how most med students do it.

If you are interested in primary care, there is a scholarship throught the National Health Service Corps. It is similar to the military one in that you owe a year of service for every year of the scholarship (4) after you complete residency. Your service is working in an underserved area (usually urban or rural).

Merit and financial aid based scholarships are available for med school, however they are hard to come by at most schools.

Since most people acrue loads of debt during med school, the best advice I can give is to try and limit your spending while you are living on loans. Going to your state, school, having a roommate and just plain living frugally are good ways to limit debt.
 
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smq123

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I thought about the military but then I though "Well...I'd rather be in debt than owe four years of my life to the military making next to nothing. I know I would be a resident after medical school and that is still crap money but at least I will only have to do it for 3-7 years as opposed to 11 through the military (I am guessing 7 years residencies are the longest? idk..). With a residency that long I think most of my debt SHOULD be paid off and then I'll start at a HUGE salary and just start from the ground up.

Actually, there's no reason why you should NOT be worried. Medical school is very expensive and, six years from now, will probably be even MORE expensive.

Even with a seven year long residency, you will NOT be able to pay off your debt. As a resident, you will make between $50,000 - $65,000 per year. While that may seem like a lot, it really isn't, particularly in comparison to the amount of debt that you will have.

Most residents, because their salary just gives them enough to live on (without much leftover for loan payments), defer paying off their loans until they are an attending. Over that period of time, interest is still accumulating....so instead of owing only $300,000, you'll probably owe more in the neighborhood of $500,000, if not more. That's half a million.

The thing is, in the military, you don't make "next to nothing." It's a pretty decent salary, they offer additional salary benefits (because you are an officer, and entitled to an officer's salary), and they give you and your family housing, health insurance, etc.

It's early, but there are MANY ways of getting through medical school for free - whether you accept a military scholarship, accept an NHSC scholarship, or pursue an MD/PhD degree. But keep in mind that each way of paying off for med school comes with an accompanying sacrifice. In the case of the military, you sacrifice the freedom to get up and move wherever and whenever you want. You'll be limited as to where you can practice while doing your payback, and that could be a problem for your future spouse/kids. You may also be limited as to which specialty you can practice in. The needs of the military come first, before your wants.

So it's something to look into, and not something to rush head-long into.
 
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Terpskins99

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And now the negatives...

*Payback is actually the number of years you were compensated in medical school +1 year (e.g. navy covers 4 years of med school, payback is 5 years).

*Upon completion of your active duty service, you are still in the military. You have to be in the reserves for at least another 4 years and can be pulled into active duty should need arise.

*If your residency time exceeds your med school payback time, it adds years to your payback service. (e.g. if you pursue neurosurgery for 7 years, you now have 7 years of active duty payback.)

*You may not get your desired residency immediately following medical school. Many specialties are very difficult to obtain in the military, and you may be required to complete a general medical officer tour prior to residency. You can elect to pursue a civilian residency though.

*For most specialties, potential salary lost for a civilian physician is considerable when compared with a military officer.

*You're in the military. You have no control over where you are deployed and may be placed into a hazardous situation where things like getting killed is a possible outcome.

Bottom line: join the military because you want to serve your country in the armed forces. Don't do it for the money, because you'll eventually regret it. It helps during those early years of residency, but afterward the financial benefits of staying in the civilian sector will tip the scales in the opposite direction. There are other ways to address your debt (e.g. National health service corps).
 

smq123

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If you are interested in primary care, there is a scholarship throught the National Health Service Corps. It is similar to the military one in that you owe a year of service for every year of the scholarship (4) after you complete residency. Your service is working in an underserved area (usually urban or rural).

There are other ways to address your debt (e.g. National health service corps).

They're right - the NHSC (like the military) will pay all your tuition and give you money each month for expenses.

The thing is, though - each way of getting through medical school for free demands some compromise on your part. The military doesn't just "give" you money out of the kindness of their heart. The military always wins in the deal. Same with the NHSC.

In the NHSC, you must specialize in family med/peds/internal med/OB/gyn/psych. There are no exceptions. With few exceptions, you canNOT pursue a fellowship until after you've done your service payback. If you want to be a gastroenterologist or a cardiologist....you'll just have to wait. There are also some concerns about job placement after residency, although you have significantly more flexibility than you would in the military.

<Sigh> Medical school tuition is always kind of a sad topic....:( Kudos to you for thinking about it before you REALLY need to worry about it. :thumbup:
 

xnfs93hy

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And now the negatives...

*Payback is actually the number of years you were compensated in medical school +1 year (e.g. navy covers 4 years of med school, payback is 5 years).

*Upon completion of your active duty service, you are still in the military. You have to be in the reserves for at least another 4 years and can be pulled into active duty should need arise.

*If your residency time exceeds your med school payback time, it adds years to your payback service. (e.g. if you pursue neurosurgery for 7 years, you now have 7 years of active duty payback.)

*You may not get your desired residency immediately following medical school. Many specialties are very difficult to obtain in the military, and you may be required to complete a general medical officer tour prior to residency. You can elect to pursue a civilian residency though.

*For most specialties, potential salary lost for a civilian physician is considerable when compared with a military officer.

*You're in the military. You have no control over where you are deployed and may be placed into a hazardous situation where things like getting killed is a possible outcome.

Bottom line: join the military because you want to serve your country in the armed forces. Don't do it for the money, because you'll eventually regret it. It helps during those early years of residency, but afterward the financial benefits of staying in the civilian sector will tip the scales in the opposite direction. There are other ways to address your debt (e.g. National health service corps).

I'd rather be in debt thanks. The one thing that did it for me was "You have no control over when you are deployed and may be placed into a hazardous situation where things like getting killed is a possible outcome."

My life is worth more than having medical school being paid for!
 

smq123

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I'd rather be in debt thanks. The one thing that did it for me was "You have no control over when you are deployed and may be placed into a hazardous situation where things like getting killed is a possible outcome."

My life is worth more than having medical school being paid for!

:)

Seriously, you SHOULD look into it, and carefully weigh the pros and cons. There are people on SDN (in the military med forum farther down the lists of forums) who took the military scholarship. Some regret it, others do not.

You might get deployed into "less-than-ideal" locations (yes, going to Iraq is a real possibility at this point), but it's probably a bit of an exaggeration to imagine that you'll be running through a shower of grenades or sniper fire each morning as you go to clinic.

I think that, so far, only one physician has actually died in Iraq, and he died from a heart attack, not an enemy attack.
 

Terpskins99

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Seriously, you SHOULD look into it, and carefully weigh the pros and cons. There are people on SDN (in the military med forum farther down the lists of forums) who took the military scholarship. Some regret it, others do not.

You might get deployed into "less-than-ideal" locations (yes, going to Iraq is a real possibility at this point), but it's probably a bit of an exaggeration to imagine that you'll be running through a shower of grenades or sniper fire each morning as you go to clinic.
Running through a shower of grenades or sniper fire each morning is an exaggeration. But I'd rather face the possibility of a quick death instead of potential kidnapping, torture and decapitation by a machete.

You don't think an american doctor/military officer isn't a high priority target by the local insurgents?

Again, my whole point was... don't go the military route because of money. In the long run, for the vast majority of people it isn't worth it.
 

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But I'd rather face the possibility of a quick death instead of potential kidnapping, torture and decapitation by a machete.

You don't think an american doctor/military officer isn't a high priority target by the local insurgents?

Not if that american doctor was disguised going to work as a janitor. American janitors don't have much value in the eyes of insurgents.

But seriously, theres minimal chance that you would get hurt. The way it looks, we will be out of Iraq in the next 4 years (Obama) and the OP has 10 years till the end of med school. So maybe, it will be worth it by OP's time
 

smq123

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You don't think an american doctor/military officer isn't a high priority target by the local insurgents?

I believe that less than 5 doctors have died in Iraq/Afghanistan.

As of March, 2007, (according to an AMA news article) only two physicians have died "in the line of duty" in Iraq. One died in a helicopter crash (which happens to LifeFlite crews in the US a lot), and one died because of a rocket attack. Other than that, I believe any other physicians that have died in Iraq died because of natural causes.

So if they're being targeted by local insurgents, then either they're being extraordinarily lucky, or the insurgents aren't trying too hard.

I'm not saying that being deployed to Iraq as a physician is fun or even easy. But it doesn't make much sense for the army to leave physicians unprotected and vulnerable to insurgent attacks. While it sounds harsh, your average military physician is more "valuable" and less easily replaceable than your average GI. So the army DOES put in some effort into protecting its physicians from harm.
 

xnfs93hy

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Running through a shower of grenades or sniper fire each morning is an exaggeration. But I'd rather face the possibility of a quick death instead of potential kidnapping, torture and decapitation by a machete.

You don't think an american doctor/military officer isn't a high priority target by the local insurgents?

Again, my whole point was... don't go the military route because of money. In the long run, for the vast majority of people it isn't worth it.

You almost made me crap my pants when you wrote that death was a possible outcome. I was like "screw it" lol.
 

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That was a joke. Nobody ever gets killed while on active duty. Most bad guys run around with plastic guns yelling "Bang bang!"

Another thing to note - which seems self-explanatory but most people don't consider - is that you shouldn't go into military medicine if you don't want to be in the military. That's a very specific lifestyle and demands a lot of things that most people don't want to deal with.
 

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Another thing to note - which seems self-explanatory but most people don't consider - is that you shouldn't go into military medicine if you don't want to be in the military. That's a very specific lifestyle and demands a lot of things that most people don't want to deal with.

QFT. Too many people don't seem to understand that this is a major commitment and a major lifestyle change and should not be takenly just to avoid some loans if you have no real interest in the military.
 
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45408

I know it is NOT about the $$$ and I KNOW I should NOT be worried about this know but I am, so I'll give it a shot.
It's not about money? Why not? Money is the reason most people get jobs.

And yes, you should be worried about it.
 

xnfs93hy

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It's not about money? Why not? Money is the reason most people get jobs.

And yes, you should be worried about it.
According to people on SDN it isn't. You should choose a career because you "love" it.
 

smq123

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According to people on SDN it isn't. You should choose a career because you "love" it.

There's a difference between asking "Will I be able to make $2 million as an orthopedic spine surgeon?" and asking "How the heck am I going to pay for all this?!".
 

phospho

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Do not ever even contemplate going into the military just for the money, or you will be miserable. The people who are happy about their decision to go to the military are people who thought of the military before they thought about the money.

No one cares about how much school you did. In the military, you are an officer. Then you're a doctor.

It's the best decision you'll ever make if you're the right person. Good luck! :luck:
 

Narmerguy

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People on SDN say that money shouldn't be the number on reason. If you go into medicine with $$$ as your #1 reason you're making a mistake.

There are plenty of people here who will curse anyone who even considers when their next paycheck will be, not to mention how much it'll be if they ever get it.
 

CScull

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I know a lot of really happy really successful people who have gone into the military but it's not something you should do unless you want to serve your country. It is extremely demanding and it takes a lot of drive to accomplish. You have to be passionate about it; and if your reason for going in is solely money I definitely wouldn't.
 

xnfs93hy

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Hmm...

Well, I still have a number of years ahead of me so I do not have to make any sort of decision right now. I'm going to knock off the military. The other one (serving rural areas) sounded great until someone said you had to be a pediatrician or something, so, yeah.

Forget about scholarships...those are pretty hard to get...

Any other options or would you just recommend loans for medical school?
 

CScull

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Loans; financial aid if you can apply for it... got any rich grandparents? lol.

I would look forward to lots of debt.
 
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Do med students who have their tuition paid for by the military undergo the same intensive training that military officers go through? Or are they simply and strictly doctors with little or no military training?

I ask because, being a thin under-5-foot girl, I received a lot of strange and amused looks when I inquired about the program.
 

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Do med students who have their tuition paid for by the military undergo the same intensive training that military officers go through? Or are they simply and strictly doctors with little or no military training?

I ask because, being a thin under-5-foot girl, I received a lot of strange and amused looks when I inquired about the program.

Yes, they require the same training. However, being that you are a girl, everything is much easier. PT tests consist of someting like 4 pushups and 15 situps for females? I can't remember off the top of my head since I am a male and didn't pay to much attention to it. You will most likely be required to do camp sometime beforehand or PT during school. Not exactly sure how it works with med school, but during college you work out on the weekends generally. I currently am in the process of being removed from the Army. I decided that I would rather have a bunch of debt.
 

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I was told that the Air Force requires a 1-month "orientation" (read: toned-down boot camp), so no, you won't have to do all the same things as most other people in the military.

Sorry, I was just talking about the Army. Air Force and Navy are definatly different and I don't have as much experience with those. I think you are correct about the Air Force, most of their time is spent in education rather than PT which helps with a shorter camp time.
 

MedHopeful93

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All servies have a orientation for docs, not a hard core boot camp just real basic stuff so yuhh can protect yur self in Iraq or whereever there are insurgents.
 

Docere

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All servies have a orientation for docs, not a hard core boot camp just real basic stuff so yuhh can protect yur self in Iraq or whereever there are insurgents.

Yeah, I figured since it would be pretty stupid to send a physician who couldn't use a gun or defend himself to a warzone :/
 

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And now the negatives...
*Upon completion of your active duty service, you are still in the military. You have to be in the reserves for at least another 4 years and can be pulled into active duty should need arise.

*You may not get your desired residency immediately following medical school. Many specialties are very difficult to obtain in the military, and you may be required to complete a general medical officer tour prior to residency. You can elect to pursue a civilian residency though.

Let's consider for a second that I'm less interested in serving my country and more interested in the lifestyle. I've contemplated many times over eventually joining MSF, which in my opinion, appears just as (or at any rate, only slightly less) dangerous than the military.

However, my major military concerns are these:

*How many years of my life will I actually end up actively on duty in another location?

*I won't be able to choose my preferred residency? So if I'd like to specialize in something not as beneficial to the military (i.e. neurology), I won't be able to?

*Is there a huge possibility of actually being deployed during residency?? (staring at you, Tired) How would that fit in with dealing with the USMLE and other educational factors?

*After being deployed, is it easy to come back and find a job in a preferred location of the US?

In other words, this lifestyle is something I'd be interested in, but not at the risk of having my future choices taken away. Also, would anyone like to direct me to some excellent sites or sources to learn more?
 

Docere

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In other words, this lifestyle is something I'd be interested in, but not at the risk of having my future choices taken away. Also, would anyone like to direct me to some excellent sites or sources to learn more?

I looked at this website when doing my research. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences pay for your tuition in fees, and you're a commissioned officer in th Army, Navy, Air Force, or Public Health Service. This is a seven-year active duty commitment in exchange for the tuition.

The National Health Service Corps offers full-paid scholarship in exchange for "medical practice in communities of greatest need".

The US Air Force will pay for more than $45,000 a year plus a stipend for monthly living expenses in exchange for a one year obligation for every year you've been in the program plus one more year.

The US Army will pay for your tuition, books, and fees on top of a $20,000 bonus and monthly stipend. Obligation is one year for every year you've accepted the scholarship. Same goes for the Medical Corps in the US Navy.

If you're really interested, I suggest you visit those sites since they also give you an overview of what life is like as a physician serving iin the military.

And I too am very interested in joining MSF. It might be more dangerous, true, because they do not allow these doctors to go into the areas with guns and weapons to protect themselves. As the MSF coordinator said, "You can't treat the ill with one hand and hold a gun in the other."
 
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45408

According to people on SDN it isn't. You should choose a career because you "love" it.
Love doesn't pay your mortgage. Don't go into medicine because you want to be on Cribs, but you would be very foolish to not consider how your financial plans are going to unfold over the next 10-20 years. I have a number of classmates who buy expensive new cars and put them on student loans. Not smart. Don't go to a costly undergrad, a costly med school, and then live in an expensive area during your residency if you plan on going into a specialty with very low reimbursement. Plan ahead.
 
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Being prior military and planning on going back in after medical school.... I would say don't go if you just want the money, you wont make it. You'll be lucky to get though boot camp. Military is a wonderful experience but few are good enough for it. And The BS about getting killed, you would be a POG (person other then grunt) you wont be anywhere near the fighting. Iraq has become a pretty safe place. Also please no one bash the military it takes more then you think to hack it.
 

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Honestly, just read EVERYTHING in the military medicine forums. There are so many threads and posts about military medicine. Constantly question it and research it. Talk to military doctors in as many fields as possible. It is a matter of making an informed decision that you are content with. Tired is also giving good advice from what I've skimmed.

I think if I were interested in the primary care fields more that I'd be realllllllly considering the military option or any number of loan payment options available, usually for working in undesirable areas. Debt is a concern for all of us and it is a legitimate thing to wonder how to pay for it, but there are options. Just make sure that you research the hell out of all options. Also, take EVERYTHING with a grain of salt. If it sounds too good to be true then it probably is. If it sounds too bad to be true then it might be as well. Military medicine can be quite the polarizing topic where you have the people that are damn near ecstatic with their decision and then the people that would rather go through torture than choose it again. I haven't encountered too many of the people in the middle yet.
 

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Being prior military and planning on going back in after medical school.... I would say don't go if you just want the money, you wont make it. You'll be lucky to get though boot camp. Military is a wonderful experience but few are good enough for it. And The BS about getting killed, you would be a POG (person other then grunt) you wont be anywhere near the fighting. Iraq has become a pretty safe place. Also please no one bash the military it takes more then you think to hack it.

Huh? Nobody is bashing the military nor do any of us really plan to. Also saying that "few are good enough for it" is a bit much considering the current recruiting woes and the desperation to take anyone with a pulse. The military is outstanding for some people and not for others. It is simply a personal decision.
 

mcclesm

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Yes, they require the same training. However, being that you are a girl, everything is much easier. PT tests consist of someting like 4 pushups and 15 situps for females? I can't remember off the top of my head since I am a male and didn't pay to much attention to it. You will most likely be required to do camp sometime beforehand or PT during school. Not exactly sure how it works with med school, but during college you work out on the weekends generally. I currently am in the process of being removed from the Army. I decided that I would rather have a bunch of debt.

Not cool. The PT standards aren't "easier" for women, they are adjusted. In the AF, I did 41 pushups and 52 situps in one minute each to max the PT test. The situps are the same for men and women. The pushups are more, though not that much more, for men. The 1.5 mile run standard is about a minute and a half lower for men. And I can max the men's time. Doctors have to pass the same physical requirements that everyone else does.
 

Algophiliac

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I'm on HPSP. When people say they don't want to be "owned" by the military for 4 years, my thoughts are that I don't want to be "owned" by banks for 20 years. I'm dental though, so the commitment is less daunting.

I don't mind being in danger or involved in officer duties, but it seems as though the military path severely limits options for residency! Disruption in training is also a concern for me, as well as being relocated to another state for residency. So no, I don't consider being owned by banks in any way similar to being owned by the military!

The military path seems to involve a lot of fine print behind the great recruitment facade, so I've been browsing Docere's links (Thanks so much! :D) with a grain of salt!
 

xnfs93hy

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Love doesn't pay your mortgage. Don't go into medicine because you want to be on Cribs, but you would be very foolish to not consider how your financial plans are going to unfold over the next 10-20 years. I have a number of classmates who buy expensive new cars and put them on student loans. Not smart. Don't go to a costly undergrad, a costly med school, and then live in an expensive area during your residency if you plan on going into a specialty with very low reimbursement. Plan ahead.

I know. And stop using the "cribs" example, I don't even watch MTV. I don't want a mansion, just to be financially comfortable...which I could also be in other professions too. Just pointing that out b.c it is like the third time you have used it as an example.
 

xnfs93hy

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I don't mind being in danger or involved in officer duties, but it seems as though the military path severely limits options for residency! Disruption in training is also a concern for me, as well as being relocated to another state for residency. So no, I don't consider being owned by banks in any way similar to being owned by the military!

The military path seems to involve a lot of fine print behind the great recruitment facade, so I've been browsing Docere's links (Thanks so much! :D) with a grain of salt!
Yeah, that was more or less my take on it as well.
 

Terpskins99

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I don't mind being in danger or involved in officer duties, but it seems as though the military path severely limits options for residency! Disruption in training is also a concern for me, as well as being relocated to another state for residency. So no, I don't consider being owned by banks in any way similar to being owned by the military!

The military path seems to involve a lot of fine print behind the great recruitment facade, so I've been browsing Docere's links (Thanks so much! :D) with a grain of salt!
Actually, the military can't force you into a residency you don't want. If you don't happen to match into the specialty you desire, you can elect to complete your payback time as a general medical officer first. Once you've completed your payback (4 or 5 years/depending on how many scholarship years they covered), you are free to pursue whatever residency you wish as a civilian/reservist (you'd have to re-apply for the residency match/ERAS, of course).
 

Terpskins99

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Also as a member of the medical or dental corps, you are a non-combatant staff officer. This means that you should not be in danger, or involved with line officer duties. Basically the "officer first" line is misleading, you are not really trained to do anything but your profession. You are really only an officer for pay purposes. I repeat, it is nothing like being a line officer.
There are aspects to being an "officer first" that extend beyond battlefield readiness (since you were trained to shoot a rifle, you will carry a sidearm and you will be in a setting where you are considerably more likely to be in physical danger than the average american civilian). There is an inherent conflict of interest. Whether you're willing to admit it or not, your duty is to your country first. And while providing the best care as a doctor for your patients will almost always fall in line with what is in your country's best interest... sometimes it doesn't.

As an example, consider patient-doctor confidentiality. From what I understand, this does not exist in a military setting. Since your patient will usually be a solider of a lower rank, you have explicit authority over them and can punish them for their actions. Your patients know this and that can compromise your ability as a healthcare provider. They have a vested interest not to reveal all their medical information to you (e.g. whether or not they've been abusing an illegal substance).
 

biogirl215

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*I won't be able to choose my preferred residency? So if I'd like to specialize in something not as beneficial to the military (i.e. neurology), I won't be able to?

Given the rates of TBI in injured troops, I fail to see how the military would be unable to utilize neurology training.
 

Algophiliac

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Actually, the military can't force you into a residency you don't want. If you don't happen to match into the specialty you desire, you can elect to complete your payback time as a general medical officer first. Once you've completed your payback (4 or 5 years/depending on how many scholarship years they covered), you are free to pursue whatever residency you wish as a civilian/reservist (you'd have to re-apply for the residency match/ERAS, of course).

However, I am getting the impression that I could easily be forced to attend a residency (in my chosen specialty) out of my state. Ideally, a residency in a certain location implies a chance at a more permanent job at that same location, and that sounds pretty important!

Just to clarify, are you saying it is possible to finish medical school, pay back time as a general medical officer, and then go back to residency? Or do you have to fail a match first? :eek:

And biogirl, I feel like a complete idiot for never considering TBI in the military setting. :smack:
 

Terpskins99

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However, I am getting the impression that I could easily be forced to attend a residency (in my chosen specialty) out of my state.
You may be forced into a residency out of your desired state even if you are a civilian. However, YOU specify precisely which residency sites (as well as specialties) that you are willing to attend. If you do not match at any of these sites, then you do not match. You cannot be forced into a residency specialty or site that you did not actually list. Look up the residency match and ERAS.

Ideally, a residency in a certain location implies a chance at a more permanent job at that same location, and that sounds pretty important!
Location of your residency has little influence over where you ultimately start your practice. Instead, the strength/reputation of the residency is a far more important factor in obtaining the most desired jobs in the most desired locations.

Just to clarify, are you saying it is possible to finish medical school, pay back time as a general medical officer, and then go back to residency? Or do you have to fail a match first? :eek:
Yes, you are allowed to complete your entire payback as a GMO if you wish.

Having worked in both civilian and military facilities, I can tell you that Marines are far more honest with their doctors than civilians are.
Really? And what percent of enlisted Marines do suspect use Marijuana? Take a guess.
 
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Terpskins99

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Amazing that you can be so patronizing as a pre-med.
Good of you to dock me 3 1/2 years of medical school, Tired. Much appreciated. Just don't tell my radiology residency interviewers. They're under the impression that I'm a 4th year medical student.
 

beerog2003

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Do med students who have their tuition paid for by the military undergo the same intensive training that military officers go through? Or are they simply and strictly doctors with little or no military training?

I ask because, being a thin under-5-foot girl, I received a lot of strange and amused looks when I inquired about the program.

There are both height and weight minimums and maximums. You may want to check the chart (although I don't know the website off hand). I am 6'4'' and was almost too tall for the Airforce. I would ask a recruiter about the physical standards.
 

ValeRx

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Don't be a wimp. Join the military to serve your country and if you want to be a doc, you won't be a little pansy worried about going into combat. As a doctor you will most likely deploy to a CASH and stay there. You won't be out on patrols or at a FOB. You will be trained to defend yourself. But if you're scared about getting deployed more than a 10 minute drive away from mommy, don't bother. We don't want you.
 
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