Best time to apply

abolt18

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Yeah that difference is anywhere from $120K and 500K+. That's the salary you would have made as an attending that year if you had started med school a year earlier. Instead you decided to spend a year between University and med school making less than $20.00 an hour. That, my friend, is the difference.
 
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TriagePreMed

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Except if starting early triggers a random series of events that kills you early in life.

Money is only worth as much as you need it or want it. A year of your youth to do whatever you want might be worth more than 500k.

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tn4596

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To each his own, definitely. I just felt I'd rather get into school and start making money ASAP!

What if you prematurely expire during med school or in residency? So much for your grand scheme...
Anyway, if you are able to get a good job and save during your gap year. You can put the money into your COA of MS1 year. Considering how interests works, it means you significantly owe less money.
 

survivordo

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If you are not going to do something that would be considered a serious life experience during this year off than I would advise against it. I have a feeling most adcoms would not be too impressed with you taking a year off to drink beer and chill with your friends while you still had your youth (although in my view this is a totally legitimate thing to do!).

Survivor D.O.
 

abolt18

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What if you prematurely expire during med school or in residency? So much for your grand scheme...
Anyway, if you are able to get a good job and save during your gap year. You can put the money into your COA of MS1 year. Considering how interests works, it means you significantly owe less money.

Good news! I have no expiration date!

The amount you could save and put towards tuition is likely insignificant in comparison to the extra year of a doc's salary. For example, at my job if I worked 40 hours a week, I would make 28K pre-tax and MOST of that would go towards my cost of living. I'd bet I could put away around five thousand to put towards tuition... That 5K is nothing but a drop in the 200K+ bucket.

If you have something you really want to do (travel the world, climb everest, sleep) and have a good reason to take a whole year off, then go ahead, but for me I'd rather not put off the career that I'm wanting to pursue. I feel like I'm wasting my time working a job that underpays me and doesn't really contribute to my future.

I have to agree with dodo in that it's a HUGE relief this semester to not have to worry about getting A's. Just need to pass (but I'll still probably get mostly A's).

OP, many if not most applicants are NOT done with their degree. It is the norm and is in no way detrimental to you if you apply at that time unless you have zero EC's and aren't prepared for the MCAT.
 

ajh1983

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I am in my gap year right now, and am starting M1 this august. Although I would love to be in med school already - here are a couple things that helped me by going this route:

1- Taking MCAT with higher level of undergrad knowledge. I finished both biochem and molecular bio majors before taking MCAT this last june. I was busy and only studied for 17 days. I scored a 36Q, including a 14 BS score (top 0.5%tile for section). Not taking MCAT early in junior year like others definitely helped me.

2- Working in pharma research scientist position making the usual 30k/yr. The money isn't really helpful, but having current research/degree under my belt helped me stand out during interview time. Being older helped as well.

3- It has been a chance for the misses and I to just enjoy life, drink wine, work out, read, take road trips, etc. Not studying since this past june has been awesome. And... I'm WAY more in the mood to go back to school than if I was a senior right now still studying.

4- More time to prepare/scout housing/travel to campus/city. I feel better prepared for the upcoming move/adjustment.

To each their own. Gap year = less money in pocket by age 40, but it has been less stress and enjoyable for me. Just try to enjoy your path, which ever it may be. Stressing is for the birds, and med students, and residents, and attendings.
 

Buckeye1992

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Thanks for all the thoughts. ^ congrats on your MCAT. I wish I could have scored that high. I basically took only the pre req classes before mine (which I took between my sophomore and junior year). It would have been nice to study only 17 days. I studied 1.5-2 hours a day for about 2-2.5 months and ended up with a 31(11/10/10). I was thinking about going full time this summer so I can finish in the upcoming fall (since I only need 6 more classes to graduate). Seems like that may be the best of both worlds? Thoughts? Would it be hard to keep up with apps while taking a full load of classes?
 

abolt18

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Well 31 is a great score and if you have an OK GPA and good EC's I don't see any reason why you couldn't get in this year. As has been said do what feels best for you. Only you could know if going full time this summer would be beneficial. I've done part time the past 2 summers and I don't think it's bad at all. I managed to get through all my secondaries with no problem. Just manage your time wisely. The hard thing for me was missing class (specifically all my micro labs) for interviews this past fall. All my profs were totally understanding and supportive but it was just frustrating to be playing catch-up all the time. Now it's done and I'm happy to I did it now and not later! Also, if you already took the MCAT last year with a great score, I don't see why you wouldn't apply now. Just know all you can about each school so you can figure out where you'd like to apply. Don't waste money applying to schools you realistically wouldn't attend.
 

Buckeye1992

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3.76 cgpa 3.7x sgpa. Basic ECs 100 hr shadowing and hospital volunteering each. 30 hr research. 20 hr inner city school tutoring. Looking to apply broad so I can have some choices. Just want to find what's best for my family. My wife will be an English teacher so finding somewhere she can work would be key.
 

abolt18

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3.76 cgpa 3.7x sgpa. Basic ECs 100 hr shadowing and hospital volunteering each. 30 hr research. 20 hr inner city school tutoring. Looking to apply broad so I can have some choices. Just want to find what's best for my family. My wife will be an English teacher so finding somewhere she can work would be key.

Awesome well I'd say you look like a pretty stellar applicant on paper so good luck to you! I wouldn't be surprised if you have quite a few schools to choose from.
 
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Not really. If you've done everything we require of you (pre-reqs; grades; MCAT; LORs; ECs, etc) then there' no reason to disapprove.

Note: Generally the younger the interviewee, the more immature s/he may appear to the interviewer. We have specific questions designed to root out this character flaw. Just because one is smart doesn't mean they're mature.

Is there much of a difference when you apply(junior year compared to end of senior year)?
 
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