Quantcast

BS vs MS - limitations?

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Dr 14220

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2005
Messages
92
Reaction score
2
It seems that the new trend for PA programs is to offer a Masters level degree. That said, it seems like many of the programs that offer only a BS follow an extremely, if not identical, curriculum.

So......what exactly is the difference b/w these programs. Is there any disadvantage or limitations for those who are now coming out with the bachelors degree relating to practice/licensing?
 

core0

Which way is the windmill
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2006
Messages
1,101
Reaction score
14
It seems that the new trend for PA programs is to offer a Masters level degree. That said, it seems like many of the programs that offer only a BS follow an extremely, if not identical, curriculum.

So......what exactly is the difference b/w these programs. Is there any disadvantage or limitations for those who are now coming out with the bachelors degree relating to practice/licensing?
There are three states (Missouri, Mississippi and Ohio) that you cannot get licensed in. West Virginia requires a Masters or a Bachelors. After that nobody really cares (except maybe at academic institutions). As posted above search on Masters at the PA forum will uncover a long discussion on this.

For an abridged listing of licensing requirements:
http://www.aapa.org/gandp/statelaw.html

David Carpenter, PA-C
 

foreverLaur

MSN, RN, CNE
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
1,403
Reaction score
5
There are three states (Missouri, Mississippi and Ohio) that you cannot get licensed in.

David Carpenter, PA-C

That's funny because I'm from Ohio and we have a PA programs here that does not award a Masters. The University of Findlay awards a Bachelors degree. I thought that you needed a Masters and thought maybe it was incorrectly represented on the website but I called them about a month ago and they confirmed you were awarded a bachelors degree. Weird.
 

core0

Which way is the windmill
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2006
Messages
1,101
Reaction score
14
That's funny because I'm from Ohio and we have a PA programs here that does not award a Masters. The University of Findlay awards a Bachelors degree. I thought that you needed a Masters and thought maybe it was incorrectly represented on the website but I called them about a month ago and they confirmed you were awarded a bachelors degree. Weird.
Most of the bachelors and certificate programs have an agreement to do a Masters with other programs for students who have their masters for students that already have their bachelors. There are also post graduate masters that are fairly available. In Ohio you also have CCC that awards an associates.

David Carpenter, PA-C
 

foreverLaur

MSN, RN, CNE
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
1,403
Reaction score
5
Most of the bachelors and certificate programs have an agreement to do a Masters with other programs for students who have their masters for students that already have their bachelors. There are also post graduate masters that are fairly available. In Ohio you also have CCC that awards an associates.

David Carpenter, PA-C


"In order to meet the ever changing demands of clinical medicine and PA education Cuyahoga Community College, in partnership with Cleveland State University, is offering a physician assistant education program that will award students a Master of Science degree in Health Sciences as well as a certificate in Physician Assistant Studies upon program completion. "

^--Wouldn't that qualify as a Masters degree? Or does it specifically have to be a Masters in Physician Assistant to qualify?

I just called the University of Findlay and spoke to someone in admissions who told me they award a Masters degree. So now I dunno cuz somebody in the specific department said it is an undergraduate BS program.

It would certainly seem silly to award anything but a Masters degree if that is required to practice here though!
 

guetzow

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2005
Messages
1,866
Reaction score
2
It seems that the new trend for PA programs is to offer a Masters level degree. That said, it seems like many of the programs that offer only a BS follow an extremely, if not identical, curriculum.

So......what exactly is the difference b/w these programs. Is there any disadvantage or limitations for those who are now coming out with the bachelors degree relating to practice/licensing?

In a nutshell, Degree Inflation. Practically Speaking, Recruiters/Head Hunters/Docs at interviews "DO NOT" know the difference, and have extreeeeeeeem difficulty comprehending that ALL PA PROGRAMS ARE VIRTUALLY THE SAME (Cert through Masters). So, having said that, THE ONLY PRACTICAL REASON to get a Masters is Increased Marketability. I have one, by the way. I'm not anti-masters; just calling a spade a spade.
 

core0

Which way is the windmill
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2006
Messages
1,101
Reaction score
14
"In order to meet the ever changing demands of clinical medicine and PA education Cuyahoga Community College, in partnership with Cleveland State University, is offering a physician assistant education program that will award students a Master of Science degree in Health Sciences as well as a certificate in Physician Assistant Studies upon program completion. "

^--Wouldn't that qualify as a Masters degree? Or does it specifically have to be a Masters in Physician Assistant to qualify?

I just called the University of Findlay and spoke to someone in admissions who told me they award a Masters degree. So now I dunno cuz somebody in the specific department said it is an undergraduate BS program.

It would certainly seem silly to award anything but a Masters degree if that is required to practice here though!

That would qualify. The issue is that most CC programs don't specify a bachelors for admission which is a prerequisite for a Masters.

David Carpenter, PA-C
 
This thread is more than 14 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.
Top