1. The SDN iPhone App is back and free through November! Get it today and please post a review on the App Store!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

changing careers- could use some help please!!!

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by KATS82md, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. KATS82md

    KATS82md New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Hi,
    I guess I'll provide some background first. I am currently 23, almost 24. I graduated from a top- notch (but not ivy), name brand college with a 3.2GPA in the business school. I've been working for 2 years now at a prestigious global accounting firm... and I hate it. I have realized that my 10 year "pull" towards being a doctor is not just a silly joke, but something that I really do want to pursue. So, now that I have made the final decision that I actually do want to do this, I am a little lost and a lot nervous about what to do/where to begin. My thought is to apply for spring admission into a postbacc program at columbia, NYU, and a couple other New York schools. I havent taken any science courses to speak of bc I was in the business school. I was thinking that from now until then, however, I can take a couple classes on my own at a good state school near me so I can be better prepared for the post bacc program. Will those courses and grades be seen then in my GPA from undergrad?? I'm not sure how the whole GPA thing works. Any course you take anywhere will factor into your GPA? I was thinking I could work/volunteer in a health related field during this time too. Does this sound like a good plan? Is my GPA too low to begin with? Does starting a postbacc program in the spring semester put me at a disadvantage? How long would it take to complete the full program? I would expect that I could plan on entering med school in 2009- is this reasonable?
    These are just a couple of my concerns... but I guess I'll start with these. If anyone can help guide me in the right direction, please help!! Also, does anyone know anything/have any input about the Hofstra postbacc program??
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. obrn

    obrn Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    If you have no science credits to speak of, then I would think it would take you 4 semesters to get that taken care of. If you aren't going to be able to start taking classes until the spring, then I would think that would put off your application process until 2009 and your entrance until 2010. If you could take a chemistry class in the fall, then you might be able to get your other classes done in three semesters instead of four and apply a year earlier. I would call and see if you can't talk with one of the adivsors of the program that you are looking at -- they should have some more concrete answers for you. When I was looking around at programs, I found that the advisors were very willing to sit down and meet with me, even if I wasn't yet committed to attending their program.
     
  4. Captain Fantastic

    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2005
    Messages:
    1,756
    Likes Received:
    14
    Yes, any course you take -- even ala carte -- will factor into your GPA when it gets calculated. The only catch is courses taken as a grad student get counted separately.

    Volunteering or working in a health related field is a good idea.

    No, your GPA isn't too low but be aware that the average accepted student has something like a 3.6. So you're starting off a little disadvantaged, but it's nothing you won't overcome.

    It doesn't matter when you start your post-bacc, unless the specific timing of it doesn't fit with when you want to enter medical school. The important part is to do well. Different post-baccs have different features and schedules: some are one year, others are two.

    To enter in fall 2009 you'll apply over the summer of 2008. Remember its a marathon not a sprint. Set goals and pace yourself. Good luck!
     
  5. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member
    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    30,983
    Likes Received:
    9,863
    Status:
    Attending Physician

    First, if you haven't taken any science classes don't do it before a postbac to prepare -- some postbacs won't even allow you to be eligible for their programs if you already have any of the sciences. Second, with a 3.2 from a good school, you probably have a shot at some of the name brand formal postbacs, and so I would suggest you apply to those in addition to the NY ones you listed. Some of the formal programs out there do a better job of advising and marketing you so for some, there is an advantage. Third, do not start a postbac in the spring. It's best to start when the majority of people do, as you may end up wanting to get into study groups etc. It is much harder if you don't have a core group of friends to compare notes etc. with. Most postbacs are two years. A few let you do it in about a year with a heavier load and perhaps a summer. But this is not a race and you are not particularly old, so don't rush it. With a 3.2, you need to pull up the GPA a bit in your postbac, and so that means you will be needing to get mostly A's. All courses you take in undergrad or a non-graduate level postbac program, or even just any nongraduate level university class, will get factored into a column on AMCAS as your cumulative undergrad + postbac GPA, which is hte one med schools reportedly look at most stringently. Most people don't do as well when they rush the prereqs - So expect to take your time. This is not a race, it's a process. Hope that helps. Good luck.
     

Share This Page