Sep 9, 2019
66
8
Hello I was debating between applying to Canadian and US schools. In particular, I am really interested in going to Dental Schools in Canada. I'm in the US and citizen of US.

I was told it will be unsuccessful venture and will waste money. They say I will end up jobless and then be unable to return back to US as they state the Canadian degree means nothing. Please tell me there is there no truth to their words? Is it possible to get a degree from there and be able to practice easily in Canada? Or will I be able to come back after getting the degree and practice in America? Or will US clinics look down canadian degrees? Also whats the process for residency in Canada. Is it better to specialize in Canada or is US better? Please advise me as this determines where I will apply

Thanks in advance!!!
 

dentistrydmd

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2014
227
111
Whoever told you that doesn't really know what they are talking about. Canadian and American dental schools are equivalent according to the Joint Commission of the ADA. There is a reciprocal agreement where those graduating from Canadian schools may practice in the US and vice versa. As a US citizen (citizenship would be the only factor that might affect job opportunities due to visa issues) you will have no problem. Of course you must take the board exams to practice in the US or Canada, which would not be an issue.

The one issue you might have is that Canadian schools are tremendously competitive versus the US. If you have the grades for it, its worth applying because you will ultimately pay a lot less for your education to the envy of your colleagues in the US if you get into a Canadian school.

I believe the most US friendly schools in Canada would be McGill University, University of British Columbia and University of Toronto, so I would apply to those if you can.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Sep 9, 2019
66
8
Thank you again so much! I was trying to explain this to them however they believe the States is the best and only education. But I will show this to them! Thank you again so much!!!
Whoever told you that doesn't really know what they are talking about. Canadian and American dental schools are equivalent according to the Joint Commission of the ADA. There is a reciprocal agreement where those graduating from Canadian schools may practice in the US and vice versa. As a US citizen (citizenship would be the only factor that might affect job opportunities due to visa issues) you will have no problem. Of course you must take the board exams to practice in the US or Canada, which would not be an issue.

The one issue you might have is that Canadian schools are tremendously competitive versus the US. If you have the grades for it, its worth applying because you will ultimately pay a lot less for your education to the envy of your colleagues in the US if you get into a Canadian school.

I believe the most US friendly schools in Canada would be McGill University, University of British Columbia and University of Toronto, so I would apply to those if you can.
 
About the Ads

dentistrydmd

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2014
227
111
Yes of course. They are also all CODA accredited. Many Canadians have gone to the US following dental school for residency or specialty and are still practicing in the US. The same reciprocal agreement applies for specialty. It would be no different for you.

However, keep in mind if you go to the US for specialty (obviously there are more programs in the states) it may be easier to get licensure since you might not need to take the ADEX or NERB for some states and can use the specialty training itself for licensure. The reason for this is some state licensing boards will accept three years in a US training program alone as licensure without taking the ADEX or NERB licensing exams. But if you plan on taking those exams regardless there will be no difference.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

dentistrydmd

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2014
227
111
Thank you again so much! I was trying to explain this to them however they believe the States is the best and only education. But I will show this to them! Thank you again so much!!!
They clearly have never been to Canadian dental schools. Tell them to look up how implantology was brought to North America. Most Canadian dental students chose to go to Canadian dental schools over US dental schools and the Canadians in US dental schools are regularly in the top 20% of US dental schools (this is commonly the case at NYU, UPenn, Columbia, USC).
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Sep 9, 2019
66
8
Yes of course. They are also all CODA accredited. Many Canadians have gone to the US following dental school for residency or specialty and are still practicing in the US. The same reciprocal agreement applies for specialty. It would be no different for you.

However, keep in mind if you go to the US for specialty (obviously there are more programs in the states) it may be easier to get licensure since you might not need to take the ADEX or NERB for some states and can use the specialty training itself for licensure. The reason for this is some state licensing boards will accept three years in a US training program alone as licensure without taking the ADEX or NERB licensing exams. But if you plan on taking those exams regardless there will be no difference.
Sorry I'm a bit confused about this part. So I can specialize in US after getting a DMO from Canada? And you are saying there are specialization options in Canada but US offers more?
As for the boards, I will end up taking it again? In order to practice in the US?
 

dentistrydmd

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2014
227
111
Sorry I'm a bit confused about this part. So I can specialize in US after getting a DMO from Canada? And you are saying there are specialization options in Canada but US offers more?
As for the boards, I will end up taking it again? In order to practice in the US?
Of course there are a lot of schools you can specialize at in Canada and many programs, but unexpectedly due to the difference in populations of the countries, there are many more dental schools (and specialty programs) in the US... Of course you can specialize in the US after going to a Canadian dental school. That will not be a problem.

No you would take the licensing board exams only once. Every state licensing board does things differently and that's where after dental school you will have to learn about how to navigate the system. This does not differ whether you graduate from US or Canadian schools. If you'd like you can DM me and I'll elaborate.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Feb 1, 2020
27
18
Status
  1. Pre-Dental
lol, no. Canadian schools are very good and if you end up there you will be getting a top-notch education with most of the schools having a much smaller class size than US schools. As nhelens stated, there are procedures for students from both sides to be able to practice in both countries by taking US or Canadian boards respectively.

UBC comes to mind as they accept both the American and Canadian DAT where ~ 50% of the students in a class there end up taking both boards. I will also add that McGill isn't really US-friendly but rather inclined to take you if you have proficiency in French. UBC, on the other hand, is trying to attract more US students and is trying to increase their OOC students from 5 in future years.


Really this is more of a question of fit than prospects. If you have the academic and language chops to get into a Canadian school (and you like the idea of studying abroad) you will not be limited by the institution that you attend.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

dentistrydmd

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2014
227
111
lol, no. Canadian schools are very good and if you end up there you will be getting a top-notch education with most of the schools having a much smaller class size than US schools. As nhelens stated, there are procedures for students from both sides to be able to practice in both countries by taking US or Canadian boards respectively.

UBC comes to mind as they accept both the American and Canadian DAT where ~ 50% of the students in a class there end up taking both boards. I will also add that McGill isn't really US-friendly but rather inclined to take you if you have proficiency in French. UBC, on the other hand, is trying to attract more US students and is trying to increase their OOC students from 5 in future years.


Really this is more of a question of fit than prospects. If you have the academic and language chops to get into a Canadian school (and you like the idea of studying abroad) you will not be limited by the institution that you attend.
FYI McGill is a completely English speaking school, and I have friends that didn't speak a word of french who went there... Also FYI McGill University is about 20% US enrollment, so it is probably the most US friendly school out there.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

MG14

2+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2018
116
197
Check out Dalhousie University as well.

I’m from the US and attend there. It’s a GREAT way to go. This upcoming year I’m only paying $4k more in tuition (Also being an international student) than I would be at my instate school. Just over half of the international students in my class are from the US.

Our school is also a testing site for boards, as well as the CDCA. The CDCA is a licensing exam accepted by 45 out of the 50 states with 2 more in the process of approving. So it’s honestly a great option. Whoever gave you your info initially doesn’t have a clue it seems like.

PM me if you have any question or want more info.

ps Along with going back to the states to practice, I personally know students who just graduated who went into GPRs, AEGDs, and Dental Anesthesia so you can specialize as well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users
About the Ads
Sep 9, 2019
66
8
Thank you again so much! I will definitely in the future will!!
Check out Dalhousie University as well.

I’m from the US and attend there. It’s a GREAT way to go. This upcoming year I’m only paying $4k more in tuition (Also being an international student) than I would be at my instate school. Just over half of the international students in my class are from the US.

Our school is also a testing site for boards, as well as the CDCA. The CDCA is a licensing exam accepted by 45 out of the 50 states with 2 more in the process of approving. So it’s honestly a great option. Whoever gave you your info initially doesn’t have a clue it seems like.

PM me if you have any question or want more info.

ps Along with going back to the states to practice, I personally know students who just graduated who went into GPRs, AEGDs, and Dental Anesthesia so you can specialize as well.
 

oralcare123

10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2010
1,823
850
Status
Hello I was debating between applying to Canadian and US schools. In particular, I am really interested in going to Dental Schools in Canada. I'm in the US and citizen of US.

I was told it will be unsuccessful venture and will waste money. They say I will end up jobless and then be unable to return back to US as they state the Canadian degree means nothing. Please tell me there is there no truth to their words? Is it possible to get a degree from there and be able to practice easily in Canada? Or will I be able to come back after getting the degree and practice in America? Or will US clinics look down canadian degrees? Also whats the process for residency in Canada. Is it better to specialize in Canada or is US better? Please advise me as this determines where I will apply

Thanks in advance!!!
Gee, who do you listen to?
You are able to get licensed in any US state with a degree from an accredited by CODA dental school. Most Canadian schools are accredited, so no problem here
It is very hard to get admission to a Canadian dental school, since there very little seats available and they mostly look at stats. They are much cheaper too. In regards to practicing, there should be an agreement between US and Canada about that, It is very hard for US residents to get residency in Canada. You should inquire at the appropriate government agency
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

doccute

7+ Year Member
Jul 4, 2012
11
2
Status
  1. Dentist
Dal grad here. Dalhousie should be at the top of your list if you are considering studying Dentistry in Canada and planning to return to the US. Not only is it a great program,we had many US students in my class and Dalhousie also hosts the CDCA (as mentioned by MG14 above) which makes life a whole lot easier for you licensing-wise.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Feb 16, 2020
2
0
Status
  1. Pre-Dental
Does anyone know the class profiles/statistics for McGill, UBC, and Dalhousie? I am a US student thinking of applying to those three, but I can't seem to find their stats anywhere. Just want to see if I would even be competitive! Thanks!
 

dentistrydmd

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2014
227
111
Does anyone know the class profiles/statistics for McGill, UBC, and Dalhousie? I am a US student thinking of applying to those three, but I can't seem to find their stats anywhere. Just want to see if I would even be competitive! Thanks!
If you have a GPA from 3.85 (out of 4.0) and above (the most important determining factor to receiving an interview) you should be reasonably competitive. Keep in mind that there aren't many spots for internationals, but if you are a well-rounded applicant it is worth applying.

Post-interview, the acceptance process differs between schools.
 
Sep 9, 2019
66
8
Hello everyone, I got good stats and plan to apply to canada. The only thing is...is there a chance of me coming back or my degree being accepted? Can someone send me a link so atleast im certain? Lots of family and friends are telling me not to go or not to apply. Please give me anything so atleast im not worried and can come back and practice in us in the future
 

dentistrydmd

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2014
227
111
Hello everyone, I got good stats and plan to apply to canada. The only thing is...is there a chance of me coming back or my degree being accepted? Can someone send me a link so atleast im certain? Lots of family and friends are telling me not to go or not to apply. Please give me anything so atleast im not worried and can come back and practice in us in the future
As the other post mentioned, there is a reciprocal agreement between Canada and the US. Ie. all degrees awarded in Canada and the US may be used in Canada or the US. As a Canadian dental school graduate myself and having taken the US board exams I am completely eligible to work in the US. Keep in mind the practical exams (CDCA/ADEX) may not be offered at dental schools in Canada and you may have to take that in the US if your wish it to work in a state that requires that exam for clinical licensure.
 
About the Ads

Mauricio45

7+ Year Member
Sep 15, 2013
149
120
Status
How is UBC and Toronto in terms of education? Do new grads feel prepared? Rumour is it that UBC grads come out unprepared for the real world compared to other Canadian schools.
 

MG14

2+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2018
116
197
As the other post mentioned, there is a reciprocal agreement between Canada and the US. Ie. all degrees awarded in Canada and the US may be used in Canada or the US. As a Canadian dental school graduate myself and having taken the US board exams I am completely eligible to work in the US. Keep in mind the practical exams (CDCA/ADEX) may not be offered at dental schools in Canada and you may have to take that in the US if your wish it to work in a state that requires that exam for clinical licensure.
CDCA/ADEX is offered at Dalhousie. Not sure about the others.

And to the other comments, the dental schools in Canada are similar to the states. Dental school itself is messed up. Lot of money, time, and jumping through hoops set on fire, with minimal learning. Doesn’t matter where you go in US or Canada, its all a similar game. Go wherever is cheapest, and feasible
 
Sep 9, 2019
66
8
Okay but how can I be credited on both countries? Do canadian dental schools offer American dental school exams? Or is there way I can do both in one? Can someone give me a source so I can verify or atleast some leasting
 

dentistrydmd

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2014
227
111
Okay but how can I be credited on both countries? Do canadian dental schools offer American dental school exams? Or is there way I can do both in one? Can someone give me a source so I can verify or atleast some leasting
The degrees are recognized in both countries. You only need to take the us and Canadian board exams to be licensed in both countries. Yes the us board exams are accessible anywhere you go to school whether it be in Canada or the US. Us dental board exams are administered at testing centers (ie. prometric) whether you are taking them in Canada or the us.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

MG14

2+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2018
116
197
Okay but how can I be credited on both countries? Do canadian dental schools offer American dental school exams? Or is there way I can do both in one? Can someone give me a source so I can verify or atleast some leasting
Ive attached some pictures. One’s from the ADA (CODA) and the other is CDAC (Canadian accreditation)

both came from their websites.

I’m a US student attending school in Canada with plans to go back once I graduate. PM me if you have questions
 

Attachments

  • AA1E27D6-4CB8-4348-9DC2-0D04D71ABA2C.jpeg
    AA1E27D6-4CB8-4348-9DC2-0D04D71ABA2C.jpeg
    285.6 KB · Views: 6
  • 6DC2D9F3-E4A5-401F-8A11-EABF278A931C.jpeg
    6DC2D9F3-E4A5-401F-8A11-EABF278A931C.jpeg
    365 KB · Views: 7
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Sep 9, 2019
66
8
So can I technically go to Canadian dental school and take a us licensed exam instead of Canadian or do they make you take a Canadian one and i just have to take the American one on the side? Is there specific score one has to achieve? Or is it a pass/fail test?
 

MG14

2+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2018
116
197
So can I technically go to Canadian dental school and take a us licensed exam instead of Canadian or do they make you take a Canadian one and i just have to take the American one on the side? Is there specific score one has to achieve? Or is it a pass/fail test?
Yeah. So at my school, you just take the US boards (offered at the school, or testing center here in town) and the licensing exam of your choice. The main one offered here is the CDCA/ADEX which is accepted by 45/50 states with a couple pending (if not already accepted). If you would like to take another board for those other states, (i.e. Alaska, New york) you will make arrangements to do so. You may have to travel but are still eligible and able to take it. boards are usually graded, or give you a score. but you do have to meet a minimum score to pass. You do not need to take the Canadian boards if you don't want to stay and practice in Canada.
 

oralcare123

10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2010
1,823
850
Status
I would advise you to take boards for both countries at the same time. You never know how life changes - you might want to stay in Canada or move there later. Who would remember biochemistry after 10 years?
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.
About the Ads