Dental Hygiene to DS

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

doc toothache

Full Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2006
Messages
8,514
Reaction score
2,791
Here are some comments on the transition from DH to DS.

Members don't see this ad.
 

Attachments

  • DH and DS Admission mod 9-27-12.doc
    30.5 KB · Views: 613
Last edited:
I agree. The prereqs for hygiene are a joke. I know of a few programs that only accept applicants with a 4.0 (which makes them competitive, I guess), as they should based on the difficulty of the prerequisites.
 
I am an RDH and while they may seem like a joke when you've been through all the chemistries and biology courses, they are not to the lay person. I took Intro to Micro which for a bio major is nothing but for us it was very difficult. Anatomy and Phys 1 and 2 were not so easy and biochem for RDH was a challenge since all we had was intro to chem. Now looking back I would breeze through some of those classes but I also understand where these students are coming from. They are mostly building off essentially no chemistry or bio background.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Members don't see this ad :)
I guess I fall under that 6.8% already with a bachelors prior to getting RDH. Either way, I know several hygienists personally who went to dental school or are currently attending. Can't say that any of them struggled much in dental school. They all finished RDH and then completed their bachelors in biology or hygiene plus pre-dent reqs. Most were quite successful. One is now a general dentist, another finished ortho residency, another have been practicing as a prosthodontist. The others in school don't seem to be stressing nearly as much as the other students. Saying hygiene training, even the didactics are entirely useless are kind of extreme. When it came to tx patients and even academically, they are really on top of it. Not saying all hygienists will be successful in D school, but the several RDH I know did VERY well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
yeah, i think so .Clinical skills may come in handy if there is an acceptance; they are not much use in getting one through the pre clinical years.
56.jpg
:)
 
I guess I fall under that 6.8% already with a bachelors prior to getting RDH. Either way, I know several hygienists personally who went to dental school or are currently attending. Can't say that any of them struggled much in dental school. They all finished RDH and then completed their bachelors in biology or hygiene plus pre-dent reqs. Most were quite successful. One is now a general dentist, another finished ortho residency, another have been practicing as a prosthodontist. The others in school don't seem to be stressing nearly as much as the other students. Saying hygiene training, even the didactics are entirely useless are kind of extreme. When it came to tx patients and even academically, they are really on top of it. Not saying all hygienists will be successful in D school, but the several RDH I know did VERY well.

To the list of successful GPs, ortho and prosths you can add former carpenters, electricians, plumbers, educators, anthropologists, pharmacists, and ....
 
I guess I fall under that 6.8% already with a bachelors prior to getting RDH. Either way, I know several hygienists personally who went to dental school or are currently attending. Can't say that any of them struggled much in dental school. They all finished RDH and then completed their bachelors in biology or hygiene plus pre-dent reqs. Most were quite successful. One is now a general dentist, another finished ortho residency, another have been practicing as a prosthodontist. The others in school don't seem to be stressing nearly as much as the other students. Saying hygiene training, even the didactics are entirely useless are kind of extreme. When it came to tx patients and even academically, they are really on top of it. Not saying all hygienists will be successful in D school, but the several RDH I know did VERY well.

Great comment!! Hygienist here struggling with DAT lol, and some people believe i won't pass my board if i don't have great DAT scores..haha
 
To the list of successful GPs, ortho and prosths you can add former carpenters, electricians, plumbers, educators, anthropologists, pharmacists, and ....

Sure, I just fail to see why it's so necessary to pin point out SPECIFICALLY hygienists and say they're not all that likely to be successful in D-school. Seems kind of redundant and almost smells like some alternative motives here. Why not start a thread about any of those professions and their likelihood of being successful in dentistry?
 
Members don't see this ad :)
Great comment!! Hygienist here struggling with DAT lol, and some people believe i won't pass my board if i don't have great DAT scores..haha
Eh, boards part I and II aren't so basic sciencey. It's more upper level stuff that you learn in dental school. DAT is whack anyways. I've known plenty plenty plenty of dental students who had average DATs from several years ago, like 17s and 18s and did very well on boards vs students who scored 90+%iles yet couldn't break 80 on boards.

Dental school definitely takes a different kind of smart. Just because you're strong in the sciences doesn't mean you will be a great clinician and have the confidence to keep your slots full of willing patients. Vice versa. A great clinician can't seem to get through didactics also won't make it.

It's a ridiculous *****umption to say anyone is/isn't going to do well in dental school simply because of one's profession. I can't say I've a hygienist who went into dental school and did poorly. Prove me wrong maybe?
 
Eh, boards part I and II aren't so basic sciencey. It's more upper level stuff that you learn in dental school. DAT is whack anyways. I've known plenty plenty plenty of dental students who had average DATs from several years ago, like 17s and 18s and did very well on boards vs students who scored 90+%iles yet couldn't break 80 on boards.

Dental school definitely takes a different kind of smart. Just because you're strong in the sciences doesn't mean you will be a great clinician and have the confidence to keep your slots full of willing patients. Vice versa. A great clinician can't seem to get through didactics also won't make it.

It's a ridiculous *****umption to say anyone is/isn't going to do well in dental school simply because of one's profession. I can't say I've a hygienist who went into dental school and did poorly. Prove me wrong maybe?

I am pretty sure the reason for the post wasn't to say hygienists will do poorly in dental school but, among other things, to point out that hygiene school and experience in the field isn't adequate preparation for dental school. And it isn't, there shouldn't be any argument. The intention wasn't to bash or belittle hygienists. There is no reason to get all butt hurt.
 
DH are professionals. Their prereqs, the anatomy and physiology series and microbiology, is essentially the no non-sense version of the courses I took as an UG in the 300-400 series. It's not the same but it's all clinically relevant and by no means easy or a "joke".

Your earlier post did come off as belittling earlier in the thread. DH do a great job and are important to dentistry. As far as them going to dental school - why wouldn't they be as prepared, or more prepared, than any other student who has done the standard DS prereqs; which, are essentially freshman and sophomore level sciences. Sciences that are far short of some sort of Ivory-tower-barrier that most smart DH could not do well in. Indeed, I'm sure their program is harder than most BS/BA out there with the exception of engineering and the maths. I rarely see run-of-the-mill BA/BS students putting 50+ hours into their education on a consistent basis throughout their studies; which, I have seen common among DH students.

I feel like many predents on here seem to have a chip on their shoulder about DH. Why is that?


I am pretty sure the reason for the post wasn't to say hygienists will do poorly in dental school but, among other things, to point out that hygiene school and experience in the field isn't adequate preparation for dental school. And it isn't, there shouldn't be any argument. The intention wasn't to bash or belittle hygienists. There is no reason to get all butt hurt.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
DH are professionals. Their prereqs, the anatomy and physiology series and microbiology, is essentially the no non-sense version of the courses I took as an UG in the 300-400 series. It's not the same but it's all clinically relevant and by no means easy or a "joke".

Your earlier post did come off as belittling earlier in the thread. DH do a great job and are important to dentistry. As far as them going to dental school - why wouldn't they be as prepared, or more prepared, than any other student who has done the standard DS prereqs; which, are essentially freshman and sophomore level sciences. Sciences that are far short of some sort of Ivory-tower-barrier that most smart DH could not do well in. Indeed, I'm sure their program is harder than most BS/BA out there with the exception of engineering and the maths. I rarely see run-of-the-mill BA/BS students putting 50+ hours into their education on a consistent basis throughout their studies; which, I have seen common among DH students.

I feel like many predents on here seem to have a chip on their shoulder about DH. Why is that?

Probably because they already feel like they are dentists, which they are not. Ego issues? Apparently people tend to belittle others based on the educational, economical level without having on any experience. That really shows their maturity.
 
DH are professionals. Their prereqs, the anatomy and physiology series and microbiology, is essentially the no non-sense version of the courses I took as an UG in the 300-400 series. It's not the same but it's all clinically relevant and by no means easy or a "joke".

Your earlier post did come off as belittling earlier in the thread. DH do a great job and are important to dentistry. As far as them going to dental school - why wouldn't they be as prepared, or more prepared, than any other student who has done the standard DS prereqs; which, are essentially freshman and sophomore level sciences. Sciences that are far short of some sort of Ivory-tower-barrier that most smart DH could not do well in. Indeed, I'm sure their program is harder than most BS/BA out there with the exception of engineering and the maths. I rarely see run-of-the-mill BA/BS students putting 50+ hours into their education on a consistent basis throughout their studies; which, I have seen common among DH students.

I feel like many predents on here seem to have a chip on their shoulder about DH. Why is that?

I have no statistics like doc toothache but I've spoken to real dentists about it and they all concur that the hygienists they went to school with had an easier time. Some of it has to do with our schooling. For example we also take embryology/histology and a pathology course. The other part that helps is working. We are not cleaning machines. We do not just bring clinical skills to the table. We bring a wealth of knowledge to our patients and perhaps dental school.
This is like saying an RN does not have an advantage in medical school.

As far as admittance well now everyone needs to take all the prereq and dat. I worked many years as an RDH before deciding to pursue dentistry. Going back to school has been a challenge and the higher level science is more demanding. I do believe my background has helped me a bit.

I have many years of experience working in dentistry. If nothing else I hope adcoms see I have no doubts about becoming a dentist.
 
Last edited:
I am pretty sure the reason for the post wasn't to say hygienists will do poorly in dental school but, among other things, to point out that hygiene school and experience in the field isn't adequate preparation for dental school. And it isn't, there shouldn't be any argument. The intention wasn't to bash or belittle hygienists. There is no reason to get all butt hurt.
Lol butt hurt? You wish. This isn't the first time he's mentioned the trends of DH and DAs going into dentistry and how they don't have any sort of advantage whatsoever. When a certain topic gets raised several times in a forum by the same person, you can't help but to wonder a little. ;) And you mean to say that someone with clinical experience isn't going to be prepared for dental school? Then why do you think that every dental school in the country requires students to shadow and get clinical experiences prior to applying? You can talk to the ADA board if you feel like this is unnecessary and all you need is some basic sciences in undergrad to be successful as a dentist. ;)

Probably because they already feel like they are dentists, which they are not. Ego issues? Apparently people tend to belittle others based on the educational, economical level without having on any experience. That really shows their maturity.
Haha this is actually true. The first year dental students actually have to come to our hygiene clinics for rotations. Most are pretty chill, but some of them act more uptight than the residents and attending dentists. It's pretty funny. Two weeks into dental school and they want to power trip already. These are the same type o' guys who thinks s/he is gonna be doing ortho or oral surg. They usually become quite meek and sheepish after the first dental anatomy test. I hope none of your future classmates are this pathetic, but unfortunately they're in every dental school. :laugh:
 
Sure, I just fail to see why it's so necessary to pin point out SPECIFICALLY hygienists and say they're not all that likely to be successful in D-school. Seems kind of redundant and almost smells like some alternative motives here. Why not start a thread about any of those professions and their likelihood of being successful in dentistry?

There is a hint in the first sentence of the document that might explain why dh/assistants was the subject of the post. For your second part, since it is your idea, you could write "about any of those professions and their likelihood of being successful in dentistry". Think of it as a one your many contributions to this forum.

Lol butt hurt? You wish. This isn't the first time he's mentioned the trends of DH and DAs going into dentistry and how they don't have any sort of advantage whatsoever. When a certain topic gets raised several times in a forum by the same person, you can't help but to wonder a little. ;) And you mean to say that someone with clinical experience isn't going to be prepared for dental school? Then why do you think that every dental school in the country requires students to shadow and get clinical experiences prior to applying?
You must have a different source for what is "required" for ds admission. About 1/2 of the ds do "require" shadowing. The requirement for "clinical experience prior to applying" must be the best kept secret to gaining admission; not even the ADEA is aware of this requirement since, unless it is well hidden, it has not appeared in any of the their last six Guides.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=937196
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=942453
 
ANY CURRENT DENTAL HYGIENIST DH STUDENT/PROFESSIONALS HAVE ANY COMMENTS ABOUT THE TRANSITION INTO DENTAL SCHOOL. . .

WAS DH SCHOOL HELPFUL FOR YOUR DENTAL SCHOOLING?

WOULD YOU RECOMMEND A DENTAL HYGINE DEGREE VERSUS A BIOLOGY DEGREE IN TERMS OF SEEKING A DDS OR DMD LICENSURE IN THE LONG RUN?

HELP
 
Tooth Knockn relax with the caps please...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
sorry . . .

any dental hygienist who have went through dental have any personal comments on this topic?
 
I am a hygienist that will start dental school this fall. My advice would be to skip hygiene school. Most of the classes you take in hygiene school do not transfer to a bachelors degree because they are allied health dental hygiene specific. The only classes that transferred for me were English, Psychology, Sociology and Communications. All of the science (biology, chemistry, etc.) are allied health sciences and not at the same level or scope for a bachelors degree. It took me 4 years of undergrad AFTER getting my hygiene degree AA to get my bachelors (I probably could have done it in 3 years if I hadn't triend to work part time the first year, but I digress).

If you feel you HAVE to get a hygiene degree first, I strongly suggest getting a 4 year bachelor's degree in hygiene.

Just my 2 cents. Good luck what ever you do.

If you have any questions just ask me.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
I am a hygienist that will start dental school this fall. My advice would be to skip hygiene school. Most of the classes you take in hygiene school do not transfer to a bachelors degree because they are allied health dental hygiene specific. The only classes that transferred for mr were English, Phychology, Sociology and Communications. All of the science (iology, chemistry, etc.) are allied health sciences and not at the same level or scope for a bachelors degree. It took me 4 years of undergrad AFTER getting my hygiene degree AA to get my bachelors (I probably could have done it in 3 years if I hadn't triend to aork part time the first year, but I digress).

If you feel you HAVE to get s hygiene degree first, I strongly suggest getting a 4 year bachelor's degree in hygiene.

Just my 2 cents. Good luck what ever you do.

If you have any questions just ask me.


That is odd, here in NY, specifically CUNY, dental hygiene students can take anatomy physiology 1&2 which is accepted by dental schools....
 
That is odd, here in NY, specifically CUNY, dental hygiene students can take anatomy physiology 1&2 which is accepted by dental schools....

The operative word in this quote is CAN. When I was in hygiene school I did not want to take any more classes than I had to. Think about it. Hygiene students take the same head and neck anatomy, oral pathology, dental radiology, pharmacology, and perio classes that dental students do. We also have to take hygiene specific classes. I was taking 20 -30 credits each semester for 2 years in the program. Not including aout a years worth of prereqs before getting into the program. I had a family (still do, but now they are older and able to take care of themselves, pretty much)...who wants to take non necessary classes? Plus, a community college (where you get an AA in DH) does not offer 3000 level classes, which is the level required for most dental schools.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
As a community of predental students, and with our own experiences to share others who may be In a similar situation may take these experiences as an advantage or pass it along to who may need words of guidance.
 
I am a hygienist that will start dental school this fall. My advice would be to skip hygiene school. Most of the classes you take in hygiene school do not transfer to a bachelors degree because they are allied health dental hygiene specific. The only classes that transferred for me were English, Psychology, Sociology and Communications. All of the science (biology, chemistry, etc.) are allied health sciences and not at the same level or scope for a bachelors degree. It took me 4 years of undergrad AFTER getting my hygiene degree AA to get my bachelors (I probably could have done it in 3 years if I hadn't triend to work part time the first year, but I digress).

If you feel you HAVE to get a hygiene degree first, I strongly suggest getting a 4 year bachelor's degree in hygiene.

Just my 2 cents. Good luck what ever you do.

If you have any questions just ask me.
Can I ask what you majored in? I am just finishing DH and thinking about dentistry for a while now but don't know what to do. I applied to mankato which offers a BS in DH online. And to a university in Moorhead for the dental perquisites because you have to do the labs on campus. DH is my back up plan but looking for a job full-time even part-time is tough in this area. I have to get a BS because ever since the DH program my GPA dropped from a 3.5 to a 3.3. Any thoughts? and congrats starting Dental school!!!
 
It would be better to get a BS from a brick and mortar school. Many online programs aren't accredited and you need to have all of your sciences be lab based any way. If you must take online classes, do those for history, psych, english etc.

My BS is in Biology. I actually graduated hygiene school witha 3.8. (I got a C in communications...hated that calsso_O) The University classes were harder and I ended up with a 3.0 overall gpa. (This also included 3 F's from when I was 20 and first went to school. I thought I had withdrawn from all of my classes when I was going through a bad divorce...I didn't...they gave me F's in all of my classes)

Good luck.
 
Question:

If one is applying to a dental hygiene program, does this count as a health professional program ?


Second

If a predental student is just accepted to a dental hygiene program, and is applying to dental schools..... Does this look bad?

Any thoughts or comments ?
 
Question:

If one is applying to a dental hygiene program, does this count as a health professional program ?

Do you consider dental hygienists to be health professionals?

Second

If a predental student is just accepted to a dental hygiene program, and is applying to dental schools..... Does this look bad?

Any thoughts or comments ?

It shows uncertainty but I don't think it would be a deal-breaker.
 
Question:
If one is applying to a dental hygiene program, does this count as a health professional program ?
Second
If a predental student is just accepted to a dental hygiene program, and is applying to dental schools..... Does this look bad? Any thoughts or comments ?
How bad does it look when you are trying to date two people at the same time?
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
How bad does it look when you are trying to date two people at the same time?

I thought it's OK to date multiple people at the same time; it's just not OK to have multiple boyfriends/girlfriends...hmm....maybe this is why she got so angry.

I mean..think about it. Dating is supposed to be a test drive right? To see if you're a match? Well, when you go to a dealership to test drive a car, aren't you allowed to look and test drive many models?
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Thanks.....

That is what I thought ....

:-(

But imo

Dental hygiene is a way to improve grades and learn about dentistry .....

Thank you incisor and doc toothache ....

So it is a negative attribute for an applicant .....

I was actually thinking and feeling like it was good thing!
 
Thanks.....

That is what I thought ....

:-(

But imo

Dental hygiene is a way to improve grades and learn about dentistry .....

Thank you incisor and doc toothache ....

So it is a negative attribute for an applicant .....

I was actually thinking and feeling like it was good thing!

Here's the thing though- not a single one of our opinions is as important as that of the admissions committee. If the DH program appeals to you, ask the dental schools admissions office if they would look upon it as a negative. Don't decide a year or more of your life based on what some anonymous people (such as me) think- go to the source for the final answer.

Who knows...they might encourage it and you'd get to do something you really like while setting up a strong backup career.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users
Here's the thing though- not a single one of our opinions is as important as that of the admissions committee. If the DH program appeals to you, ask the dental schools admissions office if they would look upon it as a negative. Don't decide a year or more of your life based on what some anonymous people (such as me) think- go to the source for the final answer.


Wow

Thanks for that!!!

Sometimes in life, it is easier to provide useful and helpful advice to others....

I can't believe I did not think about that....

Thank you incisor!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Wow

Thanks for that!!!

Sometimes in life, it is easier to provide useful and helpful advice to others....

I can't believe I did not think about that....

Thank you incisor!

Anytime for my favorite shark-turned-bear :headphone:
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
I am a hygienist that will start dental school this fall. My advice would be to skip hygiene school. Most of the classes you take in hygiene school do not transfer to a bachelors degree because they are allied health dental hygiene specific. The only classes that transferred for me were English, Psychology, Sociology and Communications. All of the science (biology, chemistry, etc.) are allied health sciences and not at the same level or scope for a bachelors degree. It took me 4 years of undergrad AFTER getting my hygiene degree AA to get my bachelors (I probably could have done it in 3 years if I hadn't triend to work part time the first year, but I digress).

If you feel you HAVE to get a hygiene degree first, I strongly suggest getting a 4 year bachelor's degree in hygiene.

Just my 2 cents. Good luck what ever you do.

If you have any questions just ask me.

Hello! I have been lurking around the forums, but finally made an account today! You've suggested getting a 4 year BS degree in hygiene instead of an AA if we feel like we have to get a hygiene degree first - Do you know if the BS degree in hygiene counts as the bachelor's degree requirement for Dental School? I was majoring in design before, but after working in a dental office during my time away from school for the last 2 years, I am interested in pursuing my interest for Dentistry (I was interested in high school but I was always scared to make a move apply for anything). Any thoughts/opinions (pros/cons) of the CUNY City Tech DH Program and the NYU DH Program?


That is odd, here in NY, specifically CUNY, dental hygiene students can take anatomy physiology 1&2 which is accepted by dental schools....

Are you in the dental hygiene program with CUNY City Tech? Did you apply for the NYU Dental Hygiene program?
 
RDH , NON TRAD Applicant here. .. Finally Accepted to DS. . . TUFTS, 2023 .. . .

Never Give Up
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Top