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Dental school and Law school simultaneously?

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cutiepopboy

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Hey everybody, I'm new to creating threads, but I've been a lurker for quite some time now!

I was wondering, is it possible to enroll in dental school and law school simultaneously? I've heard about how some schools make this possible.
 

P0W3RL1FT3R

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Dental school is a full time job+OT. I dont think you could successfully squeeze law school into the mix even if you were given the circumstances of having acceptances to both and permission to attend both simultaneously
 
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cutiepopboy

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Dental school is a full time job+OT. I dont think you could successfully squeeze law school into the mix even if you were given the circumstances of having acceptances to both and permission to attend both simultaneously
That is actually very good incite, don't know why I didn't think of that.
Thank you!
 

Hi Im Dent

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I only know of one dual program for law and dental and it's at UPenn. If you tried to do both simultaneously in a non-dual program, I don't think it's really possible considering the workload of each individually.
 
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Flemish

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There's literally not enough time in the day for both unless you're in a specialized dual program.


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Panis et Circenses

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I'm not sure why someone would go to law school in 2016. There's such an over surplus of lawyers that it's hard to even find a job once you graduate now. Sure we probably have too many dentists too but at least if you go to dental school you can find a job after.
 
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Flemish

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Just out of curiosity, why would someone do both? What purpose would that serve and what kind of work would you do?


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ncide

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As others have said, it's absolutely not possible.
 

doc toothache

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Just out of curiosity, why would someone do both? What purpose would that serve and what kind of work would you do?
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Actually, it is an excellent combination. DDS/JD defend dentists that get themselves into trouble.
 
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Charles_Darwin

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Just out of curiosity, why would someone do both? What purpose would that serve and what kind of work would you do?


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Actually, it is an excellent combination. DDS/JD defend dentists that get themselves into trouble.
Who needs malpractice insurance when you can go to law school and defend yourself!

But on a serious note OP, I have a friend in law school right now and he puts in an intense amount of work as a first year. He hardly has time to talk to you. I don't think it'd be possible unless, as others have said, it's a dual degree program
 
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Mason91

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So.. if there is a dual degree program that allows one to obtain both DDS and JD when one can't possibly be successful when enrolled in DDS and JD separately, does that mean that dual degree program = incompetence in both dental and law fields...since they "lighten up" the workload so that you can do 2 degrees at a time?
 

shendo

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So.. if there is a dual degree program that allows one to obtain both DDS and JD when one can't possibly be successful when enrolled in DDS and JD separately, does that mean that dual degree program = incompetence in both dental and law fields...since they "lighten up" the workload so that you can do 2 degrees at a time?

I had heard about this orthodontist who was also a judge, now I believe he does alot of risk management consulting. check out how many degrees he has:
Donald Machen, DMD, MSD, MD, JD, MBA, CFA
 
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Dentalco2020

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terrible idea unless it's specifically designed as a dual - degree. Physically not possible.
 
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htdt

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An option for you: get Hermione Granger's Time Turner in order to attend both programs at the same time. Hermione would understand, after all her parents are dentists and she works at the Department of Magical Law Enforcement ;)
 
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schmoob

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I'm not sure why someone would go to law school in 2016. There's such an over surplus of lawyers that it's hard to even find a job once you graduate now. Sure we probably have too many dentists too but at least if you go to dental school you can find a job after.
I disagree. The amount of lawyers and the amount of dentists is one thing, the number of lawyers who are also dentists (or dentists who are also lawyers?) is obviously significantly less. There is absolutely a market for this. You would be a subject matter experts in both fields, able to relate dental issues to jurisprudence. Insurance companies pay well for this, as well as malpractice.
Question: If you were being sued for malpractice, wouldn't you want a lawyer who's been to dental school?
 
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Panis et Circenses

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I disagree. The amount of lawyers and the amount of dentists is one thing, the number of lawyers who are also dentists (or dentists who are also lawyers?) is obviously significantly less. There is absolutely a market for this. You would be a subject matter experts in both fields, able to relate dental issues to jurisprudence. Insurance companies pay well for this, as well as malpractice.
Question: If you were being sued for malpractice, wouldn't you want a lawyer who's been to dental school?
I highly doubt you need to go to dental school to learn the ins and outs of the laws of the medical field. Lawyers can specialize in certain areas too, you know (i.e. medical malpractice lawyers). Dental school teaches you how to drill on teeth. You really don't need to know how to do that to defend a dentist in a court of law. I'd rather have a really good lawyer defend me in a court of law than a half lawyer who knows how to drill on teeth.
 
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Michael_Scott

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Actually, it is an excellent combination. DDS/JD defend dentists that get themselves into trouble.
agree with tootache. Especially given the increasing # of dentists and more chances for malpractices. A dds/jd would be an excellent rep and in demand... but to get there is the hard part.
 

schmoob

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I highly doubt you need to go to dental school to learn the ins and outs of the laws of the medical field. Lawyers can specialize in certain areas too, you know (i.e. medical malpractice lawyers). Dental school teaches you how to drill on teeth. You really don't need to know how to do that to defend a dentist in a court of law. I'd rather have a really good lawyer defend me in a court of law than a half lawyer who knows how to drill on teeth.
OK, your post has so many l ridiculous statements:
1. I never said you NEED to go to dental school to "learn the ins and outs."
2. Yes, lawyers can specialize too! As a matter of fact, they all have an area of expertise. "A medical malpractice lawyer?" Is that even a thing? (Sarcasm). If you need perio work done, would you rather go to a general dentist who knows perio? Or a dentist that went on to additional postgraduate training in periodontics?
3. "Dental school teaches you how to drill ON teeth." Where do I begin? Nevermind, that statement just speaks for itself. I guess people need 4 years of additional education as well as the many who choose 1 year PG programs just to "drill on teeth."
4. You are correct, you do not NEED a lawyer who went to dental school to defend you. But how do they defend you? How do they justify malpractice? Where do they get their information that the treatment their clients were rendered is considered malpractice? How do the lawyers know what is appropriate or not as far as treatment? Clinically, they don't. Unless there is prior legal precedence, they need to hire consultants for expert dental advice for the information. By "expert," I mean someone who has the credentials to defend or not defend the actions of the dentist involved in the legal battle. Credentials like...a dental degree!
4. So you would rather have a really good lawyer defend you than a "half lawyer who knows how to drill ON teeth." Tell me, what is a "half lawyer?" Someone who only went to half of law school? The scenario you are describing is someone who is an incompetent lawyer who happens to know how to drill "on teeth." I guess those 7 years of combined education don't really teach anything at all.

Your implication that dentists don't know how to do anything except drill on teeth is ignorant. Tell me, what school did you earn your dental degree from? There are dentists in this thread who say it is an excellent opportunity, perhaps you should take their opinions seriously because they simply know more about the field than you in every possible way.
Take a look at hospitals around the country. How many of them have executives who are physicians? A LOT. Do these executives NEED medical degrees/experience to run hospitals? Or does it just make them more qualified?
 

Flemish

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Who needs malpractice insurance when you can go to law school and defend yourself!

But on a serious note OP, I have a friend in law school right now and he puts in an intense amount of work as a first year. He hardly has time to talk to you. I don't think it'd be possible unless, as others have said, it's a dual degree program

Makes sense! Do the costs of malpractice insurance really warrant someone spending extra time in school to complete those programs? Then again, I suppose you could make good change by defending other dentists...Still, if I wanted to be a lawyer I'd have just been a lawyer. Definitely not my forte but to each his own!


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Panis et Circenses

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OK, your post has so many l ridiculous statements:
1. I never said you NEED to go to dental school to "learn the ins and outs."
2. Yes, lawyers can specialize too! As a matter of fact, they all have an area of expertise. "A medical malpractice lawyer?" Is that even a thing? (Sarcasm). If you need perio work done, would you rather go to a general dentist who knows perio? Or a dentist that went on to additional postgraduate training in periodontics?
3. "Dental school teaches you how to drill ON teeth." Where do I begin? Nevermind, that statement just speaks for itself. I guess people need 4 years of additional education as well as the many who choose 1 year PG programs just to "drill on teeth."
4. You are correct, you do not NEED a lawyer who went to dental school to defend you. But how do they defend you? How do they justify malpractice? Where do they get their information that the treatment their clients were rendered is considered malpractice? How do the lawyers know what is appropriate or not as far as treatment? Clinically, they don't. Unless there is prior legal precedence, they need to hire consultants for expert dental advice for the information. By "expert," I mean someone who has the credentials to defend or not defend the actions of the dentist involved in the legal battle. Credentials like...a dental degree!
4. So you would rather have a really good lawyer defend you than a "half lawyer who knows how to drill ON teeth." Tell me, what is a "half lawyer?" Someone who only went to half of law school? The scenario you are describing is someone who is an incompetent lawyer who happens to know how to drill "on teeth." I guess those 7 years of combined education don't really teach anything at all.

Your implication that dentists don't know how to do anything except drill on teeth is ignorant. Tell me, what school did you earn your dental degree from? There are dentists in this thread who say it is an excellent opportunity, perhaps you should take their opinions seriously because they simply know more about the field than you in every possible way.
Take a look at hospitals around the country. How many of them have executives who are physicians? A LOT. Do these executives NEED medical degrees/experience to run hospitals? Or does it just make them more qualified?
You've failed to convince me why someone who knows how to do dental procedures would be any better at defending a dentist in court than someone who doesn't. Personally, I would want someone who has devoted all their time into law, and has experience with malpractice lawsuits than someone who is a dentist, and a lawyer on the side. Thus only being a half-lawyer.

And for the record most hospital administrators have an MBA or MHA. Some hospital CEOs have an MD, but I'm not sure why you're bringing this up because it's totally irrelevant to what we're talking about.
 

schmoob

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You've failed to convince me why someone who knows how to do dental procedures would be any better at defending a dentist in court than someone who doesn't. Personally, I would want someone who has devoted all their time into law, and has experience with malpractice lawsuits than someone who is a dentist, and a lawyer on the side. Thus only being a half-lawyer.

And for the record most hospital administrators have an MBA or MHA. Some hospital CEOs have an MD, but I'm not sure why you're bringing this up because it's totally irrelevant to what we're talking about.
Who said anything about "lawyer on the side?"
And yes, you are absolutely right about hospital administrators. But I said Executives. MBA or MHA is MUCH more common, and is significantly easier to earn than an MD/DO or DDS/DMD.
And it is relevant because your argument is that qualifications for a competent attorney should come from training ONLY from law school, and experience. Other training would actually make them less competent/qualified because it detracts them from law. Similarly, you think most hospital administrators are MBA/MHA's vs physicians. Have you considered that they could be both? With your argument, an MBA/MHA with no clinical experience is preferable to someone who is an MD/MBA.

So tell me, if someone goes to dental school and law school, are they a dentist or an attorney?
 

Panis et Circenses

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Who said anything about "lawyer on the side?"
And yes, you are absolutely right about hospital administrators. But I said Executives. MBA or MHA is MUCH more common, and is significantly easier to earn than an MD/DO or DDS/DMD.
And it is relevant because your argument is that qualifications for a competent attorney should come from training ONLY from law school, and experience. Other training would actually make them less competent/qualified because it detracts them from law. Similarly, you think most hospital administrators are MBA/MHA's vs physicians. Have you considered that they could be both? With your argument, an MBA/MHA with no clinical experience is preferable to someone who is an MD/MBA.

So tell me, if someone goes to dental school and law school, are they a dentist or an attorney?
Are you confused? Why do you want me to tell you that? If they spend all their time as a lawyer then why did they go to dental school? If they spend all their time as a dentist, why did they go to law school? If they do both how could they truly master either? That's my point.

Oh, and hospital "executives" are hospital administrators. And, apparently few CEOs are physicians actually.
"Most successful Hospital Executives have a master’s degree, many with a specialization in health care management. Other Hospital Executives may have had educational majors in business, law, and other disciplines. Today, an increasing number of clinically trained individuals are being promoted to management positions. In contrast to many other nations, few physicians are chief executive officers (CEOs) of U.S. hospitals."¹
1. http://www.ecfmg.org/echo/team-admin-executive.html
 

schmoob

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Are you confused? Why do you want me to tell you that? If they spend all their time as a lawyer then why did they go to dental school? If they spend all their time as a dentist, why did they go to law school? If they do both how could they truly master either? That's my point.

Oh, and hospital "executives" are hospital administrators. And, apparently few CEOs are physicians actually.
"Most successful Hospital Executives have a master’s degree, many with a specialization in health care management. Other Hospital Executives may have had educational majors in business, law, and other disciplines. Today, an increasing number of clinically trained individuals are being promoted to management positions. In contrast to many other nations, few physicians are chief executive officers (CEOs) of U.S. hospitals."¹
1. http://www.ecfmg.org/echo/team-admin-executive.html
I am not confused at all. If they went to both schools, it depends on what they actually do. If they practice law, then they are attorneys who have specialized training in dentistry, medicine, etc.
If you are still having difficulty understanding, please read on the increasing rate of physicians who decide to leave the clinical field so they can work in administration (as you so pointed out). They are more qualified because an MBA/MHA is a dime a dozen; whereas an MD/MBA is more rare. Their knowledge foundation allows them to make decisions within the hospital setting and understand the clinical impact of their decision.

No point in debating this any further with you, the fact that you think all a dentist does is "drill on teeth" says enough about your understanding of the profession.
 
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Cello

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Are you confused? Why do you want me to tell you that? If they spend all their time as a lawyer then why did they go to dental school? If they spend all their time as a dentist, why did they go to law school? If they do both how could they truly master either? That's my point.

Oh, and hospital "executives" are hospital administrators. And, apparently few CEOs are physicians actually.
"Most successful Hospital Executives have a master’s degree, many with a specialization in health care management. Other Hospital Executives may have had educational majors in business, law, and other disciplines. Today, an increasing number of clinically trained individuals are being promoted to management positions. In contrast to many other nations, few physicians are chief executive officers (CEOs) of U.S. hospitals."¹
1. http://www.ecfmg.org/echo/team-admin-executive.html

Is there anyone you won't insult on these forums @Panis et Circenses? There is a veritable laundry list of users you have belittled, insulted, or condescended to. How about a little civility.
 
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Panis et Circenses

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Is there anyone you won't insult on these forums @Panis et Circenses? There is a veritable laundry list of users you have belittled, insulted, or condescended to. How about a little civility.
I didn't insult anybody in any way, shape, or form. Nice try.

What you did there, however, was an attempt to insult.
 
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Cello

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@schmoob is not the first person I have seen walk away from a conversation with you after an unprovoked insult. Obviously there was no confusion, and you insinuating such is a suggestion that schmoob isn't grasping the conversation at your level.
 
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Panis et Circenses

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@schmoob is not the first person I have seen walk away from a conversation with you after an unprovoked insult. Obviously there was no confusion, and you insinuating such is a suggestion that schmoob isn't grasping the conversation at your level.
Well that was a very big stretch.
 
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Cello

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Well that was a very big stretch.

No one reading this conversation would think that schmoob was confused. So why did you say it? It was a rhetorical question aimed at belittling the person you were arguing with by suggesting that they aren't getting it. Ask yourself, why did schmoob decide to discontinue the conversation with you?
 

Panis et Circenses

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No one reading this conversation would think that schmoob was confused. So why did you say it? It was a rhetorical question aimed at belittling the person you were arguing with by suggesting that they aren't getting it. Ask yourself, why did schmoob decide to discontinue the conversation with you?
I don't believe that's the case. I actually let him have the last word, if you'll look he was the last to reply. I stopped replying to him. Just as I'm done here. Go ahead and have the last word.
 
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I think it is an excellent combination for exactly the opposite reason. We must protect our patients from incompetent practitioners. As you matriculate into dental school you will realize the incredible lack of skill and moral ineptitude in a terrifying number of students.

I considered becoming a DMD JD to hold those poor practitioners accountable to the shoddy work they perform on their patients.
I would rather hold dental corporations CEO's accountable more than the associate dentists themselves. The CEO's set the environment to favor unethical behaviors.
 
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Azide047

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Hey everybody, I'm new to creating threads, but I've been a lurker for quite some time now!

I was wondering, is it possible to enroll in dental school and law school simultaneously? I've heard about how some schools make this possible.
UPenn offers the DMD/JD program I believe among many other dual degrees. Godspeed.
 
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