rivatnt

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 16, 2005
142
1
Status
I was reading Touro's interview feedback page and a person said he/she was asked:
Question 2: If someone came in speaking only spanish to fill a prescription, what would you do to resolve the situation?

Question 3: It is after hours, and someone who clearly is intoxicated comes in to fill a prescription. Would you concede and fill the order?



They are difficult to answer in a short time. And I need to know more about the situation. What would you do if no one else understands the customer?
 

bananaface

Pharmacy Supernerd
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Apr 24, 2004
41,961
159
gone to seed
Status
Pharmacist
Yeah. There are several things that would be helpful to know in each situation. The whole idea is that they want to see how you think on your feet. If you come across those kinds of questions and think the course of action might vary based on certain factors, it is best to explain how, so they see how your thought process works. There are not always "right" answers to a question. But, there are definitely good answers, and not so good answers. The justification and reasoning you use typically separates the two.

It is probably best not to discuss these specific questions since people will tend to read our discussion and regurgitate it in the interview. If you want to talk about specific questions, I'd be glad to make some up so you can try your hand.
 
About the Ads

sharktiger

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2005
8
0
Status
Truth vs. Admission answer

Why you want to become a pharmacist? Truth: To make $
Articulate/admission answer: I want to.... ...blah blah...

Truth: To boss Technician
Articulate/admission answer...I have skills...blah blah..

the truth; don't be direct ., don't
 

rivatnt

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 16, 2005
142
1
Status
deleted


bananaface said:
Yeah. There are several things that would be helpful to know in each situation. The whole idea is that they want to see how you think on your feet. If you come across those kinds of questions and think the course of action might vary based on certain factors, it is best to explain how, so they see how your thought process works. There are not always "right" answers to a question. But, there are definitely good answers, and not so good answers. The justification and reasoning you use typically separates the two.

It is probably best not to discuss these specific questions since people will tend to read our discussion and regurgitate it in the interview. If you want to talk about specific questions, I'd be glad to make some up so you can try your hand.
 

ndearwater

SDN Donor
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2004
585
3
Status
Pharmacist
I know that some states have the Pharmacist's Right to Refuse Act/Law that protect's pharmacists' ability to use their best judgement.
 

SuperTech

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 31, 2005
41
0
Status
Pre-Pharmacy
rivatnt said:
I was reading Touro's interview feedback page and a person said he/she was asked:
Question 2: If someone came in speaking only spanish to fill a prescription, what would you do to resolve the situation?

Question 3: It is after hours, and someone who clearly is intoxicated comes in to fill a prescription. Would you concede and fill the order?



They are difficult to answer in a short time. And I need to know more about the situation. What would you do if no one else understands the customer?

I went to the interview for Touro on Nov 10th... And one of the prof. asked how we would counsel a patient that has been getting rx from the internet... All 5 of us were stumped and we just answered how we would handle the situation... Our answers were not the one he had on mind... But in the end, I still got accepted. I think as long as you have answers that make sense and not BS. I think they can tell if your answers are full of s***.
 

bananaface

Pharmacy Supernerd
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Apr 24, 2004
41,961
159
gone to seed
Status
Pharmacist
The purpose of the adcom's questions is not to have you come into school already knowing every situation which could arise and what the perfect practitioner would do about it. They want to know that you have the qualities that will let them teach you how they want you to handle various situations. Basically, they are using your answers to assess where you are as a person and as a practitioner.

Things they might try to find out include:
1) Do you see your focus as patient care or are you there just to do the daily tasks?
2) Do you use critical thinking skills when making decisions on the job?
3) Are you willing to go further for special needs patients?
4) Do you let personal judgements about who people are affect the quality of care that you offer?
5) Are you open to learning from your mistakes?
6) Are you open to learning new ways of doing things?
7) Do you respect your patients?
8) Can you stay calm during a hostile situation?
9) Are you good at resolving conflict?
10) Do you take the initiative to solve problems?
11) Do you have the personal integrity required to be in charge?
12) Are you an effective communicator?

Use the interview questions as a tool to sell yourself. Show off your good qualities. And, most of all, show them through your enthusiasm that you want to be in their program.
 
About the Ads