OrdinaryDO

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If I opt to apply for the DO/MPH program, will this hurt my chances of being admitted without the MPH consideration? Said differently, if I do not qualify for the standards set for DO/MPH will I still be considered for regular DO track admissions or is that off the table if the DO/MPH is rejected?
 

Gandyy

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If I opt to apply for the DO/MPH program, will this hurt my chances of being admitted without the MPH consideration? Said differently, if I do not qualify for the standards set for DO/MPH will I still be considered for regular DO track admissions or is that off the table if the DO/MPH is rejected?
I think you only get to pick one for each school. You dont get 2 shots at DO admissions for one cycle at a particular school.
 
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OrdinaryDO

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I think you only get to pick one for each school. You dont get 2 shots at DO admissions for one cycle at a particular school.
*Sigh* I hope not. I guess I can opt out still. I want to do MPH, though :(
 

osteohack10

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Most schools that offer DO/MPH allow students to opt-in whenever they're ready. In my experience, medical schools are more than ready to take your money whenever you're willing.
 

IslandStyle808

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*Sigh* I hope not. I guess I can opt out still. I want to do MPH, though :(
Better to get into medical school and then see if they will allow you to do the MPH, than doing it as a dual. You will have more than enough moments in life to do the MPH, even if you can't in medical school. I took classes with two physicians who were trying to get their MPHs. So it is definitely doable at any point in you life.
 
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If I opt to apply for the DO/MPH program, will this hurt my chances of being admitted without the MPH consideration? Said differently, if I do not qualify for the standards set for DO/MPH will I still be considered for regular DO track admissions or is that off the table if the DO/MPH is rejected?
I honestly believe dual degree programs are a waste of time, the DO degree is good enough.
 
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I honestly believe dual degree programs are a waste of time, the DO degree is good enough.
That may be true for some people, but it is certainly not for all.
 
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That may be true for some people, but it is certainly not for all.
There are some schools where students apply to the DO program and then they route them to the SMP program and then they go to the DO program, to me its just a way for the school to squeeze more money out of a student. I feel the same way about the MPH.
 
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There are some schools where students apply to the DO program and then they route them to the SMP program and then they go to the DO program, to me its just a way for the school to squeeze more money out of a student. I feel the same way about the MPH.
SMP is totally different from MPH. The DO school I am inquiring about offers DO/PhD, DO/MBA, DO/MS, DO/MSC, DO/MPH. They are elected opportunities for a student who wishes to go about that path for extended knowledge. I think that if a person wants to go into public health, then DO/MPH would certainly add some depth to your knowledge. As long as the program isn't a dud then I think it may be worth it to some.
 

IslandStyle808

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There are some schools where students apply to the DO program and then they route them to the SMP program and then they go to the DO program, to me its just a way for the school to squeeze more money out of a student. I feel the same way about the MPH.
You're thinking of an MPH as some sort of special masters to get the edge in medical school. It is not meant to be done that way. It is to help the person understand population health better, since medicine is geared more towards individual health. Occupational and preventative medicine fellowships both require that you do an MPH, heck they flip the bill on it too. If you know what you want to do with a degree, then it will be useful to you.
 
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Kanna15

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I honestly believe dual degree programs are a waste of time, the DO degree is good enough.
I agree with this statement to a certain extent. For the purpose of applying to medical school, I believe just being considered for the DO degree is the first priority. However, if you are really interested in public health, than an MPH is a great addition. However, depending on what you want to do with your MPH, it is better to apply to an MPH program that is accredited by CEPH. As far as I know, most DO/MPH programs are not accredited by CEPH.

If you just want to have an MPH just for the sake of having an MPH to understand public health better, than go for it, but if you really want it make something out of it I would suggest applying to accredited MPH programs. There are some MPH programs that you can do in 1 year if you are willing to take a year off, say after 2nd year, or you could apply to part-time MPH programs. A great program is Johns Hopkins where you do a majority of your courses online but spend a few months on their campus.

At any rate, good luck
 

Kanna15

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You're thinking of an MPH as some sort of special masters to get the edge in medical school. It is not meant to be done that way. It is to help the person understand population health better, since medicine is geared more towards individual health. Occupational and preventative medicine fellowships both require that you do an MPH, heck they flip the bill on it too. If you know what you want to do with a degree, then it will be useful to you.
Agree completely
 
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I agree with this statement to a certain extent. For the purpose of applying to medical school, I believe just being considered for the DO degree is the first priority. However, if you are really interested in public health, than an MPH is a great addition. However, depending on what you want to do with your MPH, it is better to apply to an MPH program that is accredited by CEPH. As far as I know, most DO/MPH programs are not accredited by CEPH.

If you just want to have an MPH just for the sake of having an MPH to understand public health better, than go for it, but if you really want it make something out of it I would suggest applying to accredited MPH programs. There are some MPH programs that you can do in 1 year if you are willing to take a year off, say after 2nd year, or you could apply to part-time MPH programs. A great program is Johns Hopkins where you do a majority of your courses online but spend a few months on their campus.

At any rate, good luck
There are plenty of DO/MPH programs accredited by CEPH. I just want it for the extra knowledge. But, I have decided to try for the DO for now and then maybe apply to MPH afterwards.
 
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There are plenty of DO/MPH programs accredited by CEPH. I just want it for the extra knowledge. But, I have decided to try for the DO for now and then maybe apply to MPH afterwards.
I think this is a wise choice. You can always come back later to get it.
 
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sunshinefl

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There are plenty of DO/MPH programs accredited by CEPH. I just want it for the extra knowledge. But, I have decided to try for the DO for now and then maybe apply to MPH afterwards.
From a quick run through of the CEPH website I found these on the accredited list:

DMU
AT Still-K
Nova
Touro-California
UNE
 

Kanna15

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There are plenty of DO/MPH programs accredited by CEPH. I just want it for the extra knowledge. But, I have decided to try for the DO for now and then maybe apply to MPH afterwards.
From a quick run through of the CEPH website I found these on the accredited list:

DMU
AT Still-K
Nova
Touro-California
UNE

Oh wow times have changed, it's good to see accredited DO/MPH programs. I was aware of those programs but they weren't accredited a few years ago, must be recent.

OrdinaryDO, I was not trying to be discouraging, doing my MPH was the best thing I ever did, but as I said if you just want to learn public health, those 5 programs may suffice, but getting into medical school is first priority and if you think applying to a dual program may make you less competitive, than don't risk it.

Going to a good MPH program with good internships and connections will be better if you are really interested in public health and pursuing a career in it.
 
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Gandyy

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Oh my goodness, if OP wants to do a DO/MPH then let them do it. The combined degree is there for people like OP.
 
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You're thinking of an MPH as some sort of special masters to get the edge in medical school. It is not meant to be done that way. It is to help the person understand population health better, since medicine is geared more towards individual health. Occupational and preventative medicine fellowships both require that you do an MPH, heck they flip the bill on it too. If you know what you want to do with a degree, then it will be useful to you.
The medical school at my undergraduate school had a dual MD-MBA degree, you get a degree from arguably one of the best medical schools in the United States and the best business schools in the world, I would not call that a bad investment.
 

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Has anyone or know of anyone who has gotten their MPH between 3rd and 4th year in a DO program? I'm looking to do this since most MPH programs with DO programs are not well established. Does being a DO medical student make it more difficult (for someone who has been through the process)?
 

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Has anyone or know of anyone who has gotten their MPH between 3rd and 4th year in a DO program? I'm looking to do this since most MPH programs with DO programs are not well established. Does being a DO medical student make it more difficult (for someone who has been through the process)?
Just FYI. PCOM has two separate DO/MPH programs that are through Temple and Thomas Jefferson. I am pretty sure both programs are between 3rd and 4th year.
 
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IDK22

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Just FYI. PCOM has two separate DO/MPH programs that are through Temple and Thomas Jefferson. I am pretty sure both programs are between 3rd and 4th year.
Thanks for the info. I'm looking more at applying to more top tier MPH programs that are not connected with DO programs (Hopkins, Harvard, UMICH, Columbia, etc.) and wanted to know if most schools are OK with taking a leave and going to a program not affiliated with them.
 

Mad Jack

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*Sigh* I hope not. I guess I can opt out still. I want to do MPH, though :(
Honestly you're better off doing the MPH from a more reputable place post-residency, if possible. The skills you learn in a MPH program are quickly forgotten if unused, so all that MPH will be worth is the name behind it. In the case of most DO programs, that name isn't particularly valuable. I'd strongly recommend pursuing an MPH either during (some residencies allow and encourage this option, particularly those programs with a primary care focus) or after residency (many employers will pay for you to get an MPH or MBA if you work your way into the management side of things), and either way attend the best program you can be admitted to. An MPH from ATSU is worth much less than an MPH from Harvard, Cornell, Columbia, or Yale when it comes time to apply for top jobs in public health or hospital administration.
 
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Kanna15

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Just FYI. PCOM has two separate DO/MPH programs that are through Temple and Thomas Jefferson. I am pretty sure both programs are between 3rd and 4th year.
Thanks for the info. I'm looking more at applying to more top tier MPH programs that are not connected with DO programs (Hopkins, Harvard, UMICH, Columbia, etc.) and wanted to know if most schools are OK with taking a leave and going to a program not affiliated with them.
]


Not sure about Temple, but Jefferson is CEPH accredited and pretty reputable. I have to agree that most of the DO/MPH programs are not great, but the MPH program at jefferson is pretty solid, I had some friends at Jefferson medical school take a year off to pursue MPH at jefferson. It's modeled after Hopkin's program. But of course, Hopkins is Hopkins