Gunneria

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Just curious, I'm starting up 2nd year in a few months and I think a big goal this summer is to just get regimented, i.e.- wake up at 6 every morning to do an hour of p90x vs. going to the gym aimlessly whenever I'm free.

Has anyone done p90x and how was in terms of balancing it with med school and the results you took out of it?

Thanks.
 

link2swim06

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Just curious, I'm starting up 2nd year in a few months and I think a big goal this summer is to just get regimented, i.e.- wake up at 6 every morning to do an hour of p90x vs. going to the gym aimlessly whenever I'm free.

Has anyone done p90x and how was in terms of balancing it with med school and the results you took out of it?

Thanks.
I did it for 3 weeks, it works but there was a few things I supplemented with my own workouts. i.e. for their cardio days Id rather go run than jump around my apartment for an hour. Also I am no where near flexible enough their yoga workouts.

I did see results after 3 weeks, but I got lazy and stopped...
 

CatFactorial

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No experience with P90X, but it sounds kind of hokey.

Waking up at 6 am and spending 30 min on an exercise bike/treadmill/elliptical/aerobic exercise is a simpler way of getting in good shape, especially if you do it every single day.
 

dr zaius

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**** that guy. I hate him so much. Every time he said "bring it" I wanted to rip his head off.
 
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In swimming we did P90X for dryland (exercise done on... dry land. Hehe). Although all of us were very much in shape, P90X killed us. All the guys on my team have major abs but were dying after the first time of Ab Ripper X, and the first time I did Chest and Back, my entire body was so sore that I could barely turn a door knob. We were a pretty pathetic bunch for a while, but it gets better I promise :)

To be clear, I think that P90X is great if you really stick to it and keep going even when it's tough. It's a great program if you go hard, especially if you don't know what you would have done for exercise otherwise. I know that for me, it's hard to get motivated for P90X without a coach yelling down my neck.
 
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I am a great believer in P90X! I really like the program. Some of the stuff they say is just marketing, but its really easy to see through that. (Tony is made to do it - he gets his "i'm advertising now" face on when he has to do it). But Yes, I've gone through P90X, X2, and am about to start Insanity-the Asylum. For me it was great and I highly encourage you to give it a serious go. If you can make it a habit, along with eating right, you will see great results. I also encourage you to step on over to the Beachbody forums, where you will find plenty of people willing to help with any questions that you might have (and me!) as well as accountability if you join some of the groups there.
 
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Oh, and though you certainly can alter the program to suite your desires, we typically recommend that people do the program as it was intended the first time through to get the feel of the concepts that it introduces. Then once you finish you can modify to suite your specific goals, try more intense cardio program with Insanity (tho Shawn T isn't as funny as Tony..maybe for howlovely insanity would be a better fit? he's more of the "dig deeper" catch phrase) or go to a "graduate" program like X2 or asylum. And remember to read and follow the nutrition guide! Its very very important! People always say that the key to health is diet and exercise, so diet is 50%. (at least, really its more like 65-70 if you are looking to get abs that pop real nice). Plus if you don't eat enough then you can end up bonking (becoming very tired because you run out of energy because you don't have enough calories) which I can tell you from personal experience is NOT FUN. Let me know if you have any questions, I'd be glad to help!
 

michfiji09

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Oh, and though you certainly can alter the program to suite your desires, we typically recommend that people do the program as it was intended the first time through to get the feel of the concepts that it introduces. Then once you finish you can modify to suite your specific goals, try more intense cardio program with Insanity (tho Shawn T isn't as funny as Tony..maybe for howlovely insanity would be a better fit? he's more of the "dig deeper" catch phrase) or go to a "graduate" program like X2 or asylum. And remember to read and follow the nutrition guide! Its very very important! People always say that the key to health is diet and exercise, so diet is 50%. (at least, really its more like 65-70 if you are looking to get abs that pop real nice). Plus if you don't eat enough then you can end up bonking (becoming very tired because you run out of energy because you don't have enough calories) which I can tell you from personal experience is NOT FUN. Let me know if you have any questions, I'd be glad to help!
I have tried P90X and Insanity and was good sticking to it for about 3-4 weeks at a time. But be careful because a couple days off turns into a couple weeks off turns into a couple months off. You really need to stick to it, but I did always see results when I would do it. Insanity is much more cardio oriented and you will sweat like you never have before, if you're into that.

In regards to the dieting, I found this amazing book called "The 4-Hour Body" by Timothy Ferris. It seems long but is a ridiculously quick read and you just need to read the chapters you want at the time. The author is a great writer and very funny as well. There are chapters on diets (Slo-Carb diet is my favorite and works amaaaazingly well if you are strict), multiple different workouts, and a couple others to help in other aspects of life and well-being...

Enjoy and good luck!
 

SpecterGT260

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I have tried P90X and Insanity and was good sticking to it for about 3-4 weeks at a time. But be careful because a couple days off turns into a couple weeks off turns into a couple months off. You really need to stick to it, but I did always see results when I would do it. Insanity is much more cardio oriented and you will sweat like you never have before, if you're into that.

In regards to the dieting, I found this amazing book called "The 4-Hour Body" by Timothy Ferris. It seems long but is a ridiculously quick read and you just need to read the chapters you want at the time. The author is a great writer and very funny as well. There are chapters on diets (Slo-Carb diet is my favorite and works amaaaazingly well if you are strict), multiple different workouts, and a couple others to help in other aspects of life and well-being...

Enjoy and good luck!
There isn't a workout in existence that doesn't have this weakness.

I did it for a month and didn't lose weight but the weight definitely shifted lol. I'm starting up again Monday. There ought to be a "lose the m1 weight" summer thread :laugh:
 

TheLesPaul

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No experience with P90X, but it sounds kind of hokey.

Waking up at 6 am and spending 30 min on an exercise bike/treadmill/elliptical/aerobic exercise is a simpler way of getting in good shape, especially if you do it every single day.
What's so "hokey" about an intense exercise regimen like P90x? I'm just curious as to what you're basing your statement off of, since you say you have no experience with it. I've done it, and I found it to be an excellent workout (it gets you incredibly sore in strange places).
 

Mdard

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I did a round of p90x during MS1. Loved it. Most productive day in school was Thursday (after yoga). I am on to StrongLifts 5x5 now. It was tough. 6+ hours a week is not a lot, but sometime you lash out and crave control over your busy schedule and chose to watch TV or something. Fight it.

FYI. I found that justifying skipping a morning workout is a lot easier than justifying skipping class, so I changed to working out either in the afternoon or in the evening. Whatever works for you, but realize your tendencies and roll with the punches instead of taking them in the face and tanking 4 days into the program.

Screw the diet for p90x...Too complicated. Eat healthy. If you feel like you could make do with less food, try eating less. If you feel exhausted and run down after a few days....eat more.

Good luck. It's a BEAST...but 90 days later, you look and feel amazing.
 

SirGecko

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No experience with P90x so I won't address that specific program one way or another.

What I will say is that though it should work out well for second year the "regimented" attitude may or may not actually work out all that well going into third year. (it does kind of depend on you) Your schedule third year will vary a lot from rotation to rotation and even week to week. I'd say that developing the attitude of working out when you can, eating healthy and just maintaining a base level of activity would help you out the most going forward. The ability to be flexible in your exercise is going to ensure that you actually do it. (the same attitude goes to reading in third year, you need to have the ability to seize opportunities as they arise and adjust your schedule on the fly)
 

CatFactorial

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What's so "hokey" about an intense exercise regimen like P90x? I'm just curious as to what you're basing your statement off of, since you say you have no experience with it. I've done it, and I found it to be an excellent workout (it gets you incredibly sore in strange places).
According to Wikipedia:

"P90X's advertising emphasizes "muscle confusion", a method of cross-training and periodization achieved through switching the order of exercises and incorporating new and varied movements. Muscle confusion supposedly prevents the body from adapting to exercises over time, resulting in continual improvement without plateaus."

That just sounds coconuts; where's the proof?

Want to look like a macho dude/dudette? Extensive cardiovascular exercise and weight training, proper nutrition, and adequate rest.

They should change the name from "P90x" to "exercise," or "workout."

And "muscle confusion" to "confusion."
 

TheLesPaul

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Want to look like a macho dude/dudette? Extensive cardiovascular exercise and weight training, proper nutrition, and adequate rest.
You pretty much described what P90x is. A mix of high-intensity aerobic + strength training such that you tire at 8-12 reps, with a suggested diet plan and a schedule built in such that you only work each muscle group 1-2 times per week and are able to get adequate rest. I'm not sure about the merits of "muscle confusion" so I cede your point there, but to me all it means is that I get a good rotation so that I'm not working the same muscle group several days in a row.

They should change the name from "P90x" to "exercise," or "workout."
90 refers to the number of days it takes to finish the workout. 'x' refers to 'extreme', as it's certainly not an easy workout. This seems like you're reaching for things to find wrong with the program...
 
C

cowme

P90x gets you in great shape, but it is far from the best stregnth training program out there. What I like most is the regimen is that it forces you to stick to a routine every day. Sure, I can force myself to go to the gym every day, but when I am really exhausted one day, I can guarantee a crap workout (I'm going to do half of my normal workout or just use the elliptical or something). With p90x, you don't have that option; if you are exhausted on week 11, day 2, you still have to trudge through the crazy plyo workout

FWIW, I've been able to do it a couple times so far this year in residency.
 

CatFactorial

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90 refers to the number of days it takes to finish the workout. 'x' refers to 'extreme', as it's certainly not an easy workout. This seems like you're reaching for things to find wrong with the program...

.
 
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Gunneria

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aight homies, thanks for the feedback... Day 1 p90x starts today, gotta get shred to bring out the 300 bod by fall
 
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I tried this for a while and then on or around Day 15 I injured my neck doing the "plow" in the Yoga-X DVD. That was easily the hardest one in my opinion. I never went back. I'm walking right now with my wife using heavy-hands.
 

roguesong

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I found that following P90X exactly for an extended time has a potential for overtraining. It's also very time consuming. An hour and a half for yoga? No thanks. Also am not sure about doing abs after almost every workout. But does P90X give results? Yes, I've gotten some good results from it. Are there better structured workouts that are less time consuming and more efficient, and able to be customized to fit around your school schedule? I like to think so.

There are three main "fitness gurus" whose advice I value more than other authors. Rusty Moore of fitnessblackbook.com, Martin Berkan of leangains.com, and Brad Pilon of Eat Stop Eat. They're not your average meathead bodybuilders, and their advice is taken from research, not broscience.

Rusty Moore has a workout ebook for sale that contains info on his workout routine, the routine charts themselves, and exercise demos. Can be found at http://visualimpactmusclebuilding.com/

Martin Berkhan and Brad Pilon focus more on the diet part of the equation. Both revolve around intermittent fasting.

The information I got from reading these three guys' stuff works for me, and I believe in it. No I don't work for any of them, just thought I'd offer an alternative to P90X that made sense to me and freed me up some time.
 

sam500

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How do you folks use the videos at the gym?

Or do you do it at home?

I haven't started P90X or Insanity yet, but I'd like to and just want to hear about the best way to do it.

I have the DVD's for P90X and have converted them to video files that I can play on my Iphone.

Do you guys watch the videos at home?
Do you convert the videos to mp4's and watch them on your iphones/ipad in the gym and work out along? That seems bulky and difficult.
Do you convert the videos to audio files and just do what he says when he says it in the gym?

Cheers,
Sam
 

roguesong

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How do you folks use the videos at the gym?

Or do you do it at home?

I haven't started P90X or Insanity yet, but I'd like to and just want to hear about the best way to do it.

I have the DVD's for P90X and have converted them to video files that I can play on my Iphone.

Do you guys watch the videos at home?
Do you convert the videos to mp4's and watch them on your iphones/ipad in the gym and work out along? That seems bulky and difficult.
Do you convert the videos to audio files and just do what he says when he says it in the gym?

Cheers,
Sam
I did it at home. Or, if you've watched the videos a couple of times already and know how the exercises work, just take the workout sheets with you to the gym and do them there, no need to watch the video. For the ones that don't require weights, like yoga, plyo, and kenpo, you can just do at home. Personally, I have a home gym and so I just did P90X at home, but if you don't have the equipment, just bring the sheets with you to the gym. You'll get to the point where the video gets annoying and you'll do the exercises without them anyways, lol.
 

necoli

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According to Wikipedia:

"P90X's advertising emphasizes "muscle confusion", a method of cross-training and periodization achieved through switching the order of exercises and incorporating new and varied movements. Muscle confusion supposedly prevents the body from adapting to exercises over time, resulting in continual improvement without plateaus."

That just sounds coconuts; where's the proof?

Want to look like a macho dude/dudette? Extensive cardiovascular exercise and weight training, proper nutrition, and adequate rest.

They should change the name from "P90x" to "exercise," or "workout."

And "muscle confusion" to "confusion."
I suspect you are not the most qualified person to be giving training advice. Just a hunch.
 

Instatewaiter

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According to Wikipedia:

"P90X's advertising emphasizes "muscle confusion", a method of cross-training and periodization achieved through switching the order of exercises and incorporating new and varied movements. Muscle confusion supposedly prevents the body from adapting to exercises over time, resulting in continual improvement without plateaus."

That just sounds coconuts; where's the proof?

Want to look like a macho dude/dudette? Extensive cardiovascular exercise and weight training, proper nutrition, and adequate rest.

They should change the name from "P90x" to "exercise," or "workout."

And "muscle confusion" to "confusion."
I assume you have never really lifted weights if you do not understand the idea behind having a continually varied workout to prevent plateaus.

You probably shouldn't be giving advice if you havent ever stepped foot into a gym.




P90X or Insanity?
I have done both. If you have a good base of strength, both will get you ripped.

P90x for strength. Insanity for fitness.

P90x It is going to help you build muscle. For those who have a good amt of muscle but need to slim down or for those who just want a cardio based program, insanity is the way to go.

P90x is not going to create good cardiorespiratory fitness. It will give good muscular endurance though. Insanity will give you good cardiorespiratory fitness and minimal muscular endurance (with the exception of your legs)

The problem I have found with P90X is the workouts are long. Almost everyday you are spending an hour and a half. After a month or so you lose interest. Insanity workouts are 40 minutes.

You have to be in great shape overall to even start crossfit.
 

CatFactorial

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I suspect you are not the most qualified person to be giving training advice. Just a hunch.
You are wrong.

I assume you have never really lifted weights if you do not understand the idea behind having a continually varied workout to prevent plateaus.

You probably shouldn't be giving advice if you havent ever stepped foot into a gym.

Use common sense. As I said above, extensive cardiovascular exercise, extensive weight lifting, great nutrition, and plenty of rest will yield results. If you'd prefer to pay money for all that to be packaged in gimmickry like p90x, go crazy.

Also, what happens day 91? You have to keep going, right? It seems like this program has a pretty high attrition rate, and I'd bet it's unlikely for even those who finish the 90 days to keep it up for much longer. And what residents or 3rd year med students have the time for this, really?

A more plausible workout routine would be a daily half hour on an exercise bike.

Additionally, you can vary your exercises every month or two, if even that frequently, but the main exercises for core muscles are largely the same (bench press, squats, dead lift, what have you). The variation doesn't have to be "continuous." Have YOU ever stepped foot in a gym?
 
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Gunneria

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Crossfits super expensive if u join the club but you can do the workouts at home as well. I personally think the crossfit community is awesome and something to consider when you're already super fit and want the challene of lifting bars and doing cleans and other crazy routines.

P90x is awesome. I feel more jacked in 2 days and im following the diet ratios (1800 cals first week). The variability, having structure. Seriously, p90x is like dit, kaplan, pathoma...you hit play and do what they say because they have a superior grasp on what works.

Just look at the transformation videos of people who were huge with medical issues transform into 300 juggernauts...that shii cray
 

Perrotfish

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You are wrong.

Use common sense. As I said above, extensive cardiovascular exercise, extensive weight lifting, great nutrition, and plenty of rest will yield results. If you'd prefer to pay money for all that to be packaged in gimmickry like p90x, go crazy.

Also, what happens day 91? You have to keep going, right? It seems like this program has a pretty high attrition rate, and I'd bet it's unlikely for even those who finish the 90 days to keep it up for much longer. And what residents or 3rd year med students have the time for this, really?
?
I think the idea is that after 90 days you keep going at a more relaxed pace with a more traditional workout routine to maintain what you've built. Its easier to maintain physical fitness than it is to make serious changes in your weight at muscle mass. They're aware that most people can't sustain this level of commitment indefinitely, so they ask you to instead to commit to enough time to make a real transformation (about the same as season of a high school sport) and then assume that you will level off. They have a section in their fitness guide about different approaches for maintaining your fitness after you're done.

A more plausible workout routine would be a daily half hour on an exercise bike.
The problem is you don't gain a lot of ground with this approach. This is a low intensity cardiovascular maintenance routine. Its not terrible,its pretty close to what I'm planning for residency, and it will definitely help you keep your rates of weight gain and heart disease to an acceptable minimum. However I don't think you'd see a very dramatic difference in how you look or feel.

I think P90X is a great system because it allows you to do 90 minutes of high intensity exercise per day, coupled with an intense diet, in a way that doesn't result in you hurting yourself. Could you put together a similar routine yourself? Yes if you know what you're doing, but there's a pretty big knowledge base to exercise and nutrition and most people (including most medical students) really don't know it. Knowing what makes a good exercise routine is not 'common sense', its something you need to learn. I've had a lot of friends attempt DIY fitness programs and they often did stupid things that resulted in lasting injuries: exercising similar muscle groups on consecutive days (or every day), pairing a low cal diet with a lifting routine, doing heavily weighted exercises with poor form ((weighted squats are a disaster waiting to happen unless you really know what you're doing and have two good spotters), insufficient/nonexistent warm up routines, etc. These aren't impossibly dumb mistakes, they're very common errors. I like the way that P90X uses mostly body weight exercises for your major muscle groups, hits those muscle groups no more than twice a week, devotes significant amounts of time to warm ups and flexibility, has periodic recovery weeks with lighter exercise, and emphasizes a eating sufficient amounts of protein and calories for muscle growth in their diet.

I would love to see a study of the injury rates with crossfit. These routines seem designed to cause as many serious injuries as possible. Weighted exercises where the goal is to go as fast as possible? Running with weighted vests?

haven't started P90X or Insanity yet, but I'd like to and just want to hear about the best way to do it.

I have the DVD's for P90X and have converted them to video files that I can play on my Iphone.

Do you guys watch the videos at home?
Do you convert the videos to mp4's and watch them on your iphones/ipad in the gym and work out along? That seems bulky and difficult.
Do you convert the videos to audio files and just do what he says when he says it in the gym?
I have a portable DVD player. Very chap and works well, though the IPhone system sounds good too. I wouldn't do the audio file thing until you've run through each routine a couple of times because you're going to need to watch what they're doing. You can do the routine in your apartment, but if you're a guy on the weight lifting days I think that means investing $500 in those select tech dumbbells because the resistance bands don't give you nearly enough weight. If you have a gym and it has a pullup bar that will also work.
 
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pdeco1

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This thread is marred with people who have no business offering fitness advice. I laughed all the way through it.

"Daily half hour on an exercise bike?" - Hilarious. If this is your best advice, you shouldnt be offering any.

p90x works. It gives you a plan to follow and if you follow it your fitness level will be drastically improved. After the 90 days you can use what you have learned to create your own fitness plan, or move on to something else. If you can even stick with a fitness regiment. Which most people in our lazy society cannot. Its most disillusioning in the medical field where people who cannot properly take care of themselves are offering guidance to others.
 

mleick

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People always start giving advice before they even know the fitness goals of the person they're talking to.

Want to be really strong overall, good at olympic lifts, and aren't risk averse?--crossfit

Want to be good at running marathon/5k/etc?-- run.

Want to be good at cycling? cycle

Want pure aesthetic ? lift like a bodybuilder (even amateur bodybuilders or non-competing guys who lift like bodybuilders look leaner/muscular on average than even the winners of the crossfit games IMO)

Want something easy thats planned and gives you a reasonable balance of cardio/weights/athetics that you can do at home? P90x


Personally I appreciate overall strength, moderate cardio, and aesthetics so I mix powerlifting/crossfit type stuff into a typical bodybuilder scheme. I agree with the above about the crossfit community being awesome, but the memberships are expensive and most of the guys, even the elite ones, don't look that great IMO.
 

mleick

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((weighted squats are a disaster waiting to happen unless you really know what you're doing and have two good spotters)
Does squatting require training? Yes. is it "a disaster waiting to happen unless you have two good spotters?" Absolutely not. I've been squatting for 10 years and have never had an injury and never used a spotter. If you use the appropriate safety equipment, and know what you're doing, its a very safe exercise and there's no substitute for the amount of leg development it provides. I googled p90x images and none of the before/after pictures included quadracepts why? Because its incredibly difficult to get this kinda of leg development with only bodyweight exercises.



I'm not trying to make a value judgement based on the type of physique that some people are after, but if you want large ripped quads, P90x isn't going to cut it.
 

Perrotfish

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Does squatting require training? Yes. is it "a disaster waiting to happen unless you have two good spotters?" Absolutely not. I've been squatting for 10 years and have never had an injury and never used a spotter. If you use the appropriate safety equipment, and know what you're doing, its a very safe exercise and there's no substitute for the amount of leg development it provides. I googled p90x images and none of the before/after pictures included quadracepts why? Because its incredibly difficult to get this kinda of leg development with only bodyweight exercises.

I'm not trying to make a value judgement based on the type of physique that some people are after, but if you want large ripped quads, P90x isn't going to cut it.
I don't know if anything equals squats in terms of leg development, but I know it is consistenly the most common source of serious injuries in weight lifting. You are putting yourself in a position where you a carrying a lot of weight and are a small movement away from ideal form will have that weight bearing down on/torquing a joint or small muscle. If you're a really dedicated bodybuilder (which if you really care about ripped quads I guess you are) then I guess its reasonable to do weighted squats anyway but for the casual lifter or first time fitness enthusiast I think its more trouble than its worth. You can go a long way with unweighted squats, lunges, and maybe a leg press.
 

drizzt3117

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I don't know if anything equals squats in terms of leg development, but I know it is consistenly the most common source of serious injuries in weight lifting. You are putting yourself in a position where you a carrying a lot of weight and are a small movement away from ideal form will have that weight bearing down on/torquing a joint or small muscle. If you're a really dedicated bodybuilder (which if you really care about ripped quads I guess you are) then I guess its reasonable to do weighted squats anyway but for the casual lifter or first time fitness enthusiast I think its more trouble than its worth. You can go a long way with unweighted squats, lunges, and maybe a leg press.
I feel like more people get hurt on DL than squat.

I don't usually have a spotter at all unless I go significantly over 3 plates.
 
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Does squatting require training? Yes. is it "a disaster waiting to happen unless you have two good spotters?" Absolutely not. I've been squatting for 10 years and have never had an injury and never used a spotter. If you use the appropriate safety equipment, and know what you're doing, its a very safe exercise and there's no substitute for the amount of leg development it provides. I googled p90x images and none of the before/after pictures included quadracepts why? Because its incredibly difficult to get this kinda of leg development with only bodyweight exercises.

I'm not trying to make a value judgement based on the type of physique that some people are after, but if you want large ripped quads, P90x isn't going to cut it.
Yes, but 2 things to that:
1) P90X is more about overall fitness and teaching people how to exercise and eat right than getting...ripped quads? (does this matter to anyone other than body builders who probably don't need P90X?) Most people who do P90X want to be able to take their shirt off and have abs or look like captain america.

2) P90X does include a lot of leg work but it is more about jumping and lunging than squats (which it does include, just not squats carrying 300 lbs). I'm not even sure that having massive quads like in that picture you posted would even be a benefit to anything that I would want to do, and would probably make buying pants very difficult :laugh:

I got some nicely defined leg muscles (calves galore) from P90X, but nothing like the hypertrophy that that person has. If you want that, then yes, P90X is not for you. But for losing weight, increasing overall fitness and adding some muscle all around, it is fantastic.
 

winkleweizen

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I assume you have never really lifted weights if you do not understand the idea behind having a continually varied workout to prevent plateaus.

You probably shouldn't be giving advice if you havent ever stepped foot into a gym.






I have done both. If you have a good base of strength, both will get you ripped.

P90x for strength. Insanity for fitness.

P90x It is going to help you build muscle. For those who have a good amt of muscle but need to slim down or for those who just want a cardio based program, insanity is the way to go.

P90x is not going to create good cardiorespiratory fitness. It will give good muscular endurance though. Insanity will give you good cardiorespiratory fitness and minimal muscular endurance (with the exception of your legs)

The problem I have found with P90X is the workouts are long. Almost everyday you are spending an hour and a half. After a month or so you lose interest. Insanity workouts are 40 minutes.



You have to be in great shape overall to even start crossfit.
I feel like more people get hurt on DL than squat.

I don't usually have a spotter at all unless I go significantly over 3 plates.
LIGHT WEIGHT. AINT NOTHING BUT A PEANUT

[YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMy3uuZResw[/YOUTUBE]
 

mleick

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Most people who do P90X want to be able to take their shirt off and have abs or look like captain america..If you want that, then yes, P90X is not for you. But for losing weight, increasing overall fitness and adding some muscle all around, it is fantastic.
I completely agree with you about most people's goals I have no beef with P90x and it appears to be a good way to get in decent shape that you can do at home with minimal risk of injury. That's why I stated in my previous post that before giving advice, one really has to assess the individual's fitness goals (e.g. overall fitness, mass, cardio, aesthetics). There's no one plan that maximizes all of those. And I actually tried to choose a picture of quads on the smaller end of the spectrum so people wouldn't freak out :laugh:
 

ManBroDude

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There are three main "fitness gurus" whose advice I value more than other authors. Rusty Moore of fitnessblackbook.com, Martin Berkan of leangains.com, and Brad Pilon of Eat Stop Eat. They're not your average meathead bodybuilders, and their advice is taken from research, not broscience.

Rusty Moore has a workout ebook for sale that contains info on his workout routine, the routine charts themselves, and exercise demos. Can be found at http://visualimpactmusclebuilding.com/

Martin Berkhan and Brad Pilon focus more on the diet part of the equation. Both revolve around intermittent fasting.
Seriously, this is all you need. :thumbup:
 
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I don't think my opinion holds very much *weight* compared to the bodybuilders and exercise buffs on here, but I can comment on my experience with P90X.

1. I'm a vegetarian, and I found the "planned meals" to be very difficult to follow because almost every meal is based around meat or fish. They do have a limited list of vegetarian substitutions, but one can one eat so many veggie burgers before you can't take it anymore. I'd say I eat at least 4-5 veggie burgers (with mushrooms, tomatoes, non-HFCS ketchup, all wrapped "protein style" in lettuce) per week. On the flip side, it HAS forced me to try to add more protein in my diet, which I didn't have before. I've been eating more egg whites, tofu, mushrooms (I used to hate them), and soy meat. Also, the protein power I purchased from Costco as my "recovery drink" has been such a blessing for mornings when I don't have time to cook a hot breakfast. Just blend and go. For the first two months I was eating a Smart For Life protein bar/day for a snack, but they are expensive and I stopped buying them. The third month has been a lot of carbs, but I think I felt better on the protein-based plans of the first two months.

2. Time - maybe it's just me, but P90X takes a lot of time from my studying. I'm not even in med school so I can't really image what that would be like. Some days I just don't have time for 1 hour and 30 minutes of intense Yoga, so I pick sections I feel I can get the most out of. I have no idea how people in school could have time for the double workout plan (AM & PM). Cardio is the shortest video, coming in at under 50 minutes.

3. I agree that riding a stationary bike for 30 minutes will probably not do much if you're looking for super "results". My exercise regime prior to P90X was just 1 hour of the elliptical, and maybe some light weights just for kicks. I was unhappy with my weight, so I downloaded P90X from a friend. I have only lost about 5 pounds after three months of P90X, but I admit I have had days where I just don't feel like listening to Tony's voice. I am proud of myself though for changing my entire diet around (I haven't had bread or donuts or In-N-Out in 3 months!) and for all 7 pull-ups I can do now! I feel like one would have to follow the workout and nutritional guide near perfectly in order to see the so called "amazing results", but I'm happy with where I am at now.

4. As for the person asking what happens after 90 days? Maybe P90X2? And after that? Insanity?

If you are going to do P90X, my advice is to not be afraid to hit the pause button when you're feeling exhausted. Even better advice? Don't forget to hit the play button after your water break!
 
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Gunneria

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I think med school forces u to be more balanced and i know i cant imagine doing p90x in the midst of anatomy lab...i think u just have to bevery very disciplined essentially and find out what ur goals are...this is my last free summer so im like whatevs might as well ironman up do p90x... Durig second year i prob will stick with the 20 min insanity sessions and some basic dumbbell lifts and occasional squats- much more doable.

More importantly think about the time wasted during the day...we are all human but for me yeah the baby 15-20 minutes walking in the gym or pointless lecture that couldve been 2xed---couldve been p90x time
 

coffeeeandtea

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THIS. i first started with p90x and then went for insanity. p90x definitely increased my strength and overall conditioning, but i felt like i got better results (aesthetically) with insanity. also the hour-long workouts for p90x are waaay too long. insanity workouts are 20 min (first month) or 40 min. the problem with both of these videos are that they get boring after you finish them. i started doing crossfit because of the constant variation and the super high intensity. workouts are usually <30 min, and combine everything from weight lifting to cardio to gymnastics (ring muscle-ups, etc).

i can finally do a legit pull-up thanks to crossfit. and i'd never done pull-ups in my life before now. yes it's expensive but it's almost the same as a Equinox gym membership, and crossfit is def more worth it to me than a regular gym membership
 

SpecterGT260

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never done crossfit. from what I understand, you need a gym membership to do it right? I do p90x because I can do it at home. with travel time, an hour at home is about the same as 30 min at a gym.