Double approach-avoidance conflict

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Wolfpack93

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Can anyone explain this type of conflict? I've never seen double approach-avoidance and I'm not really getting a good grasp from google or the practice test it was seen in.

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Let's say you have (2) goals. Goal #1: be forever married to a beautiful, faithful spouse. Goal #2: always have just enough of a salary to be able to be comfortable.

1. Approach-Approach conflict = both goals are appealing. If a genie says, you may pick 1 or 2, you wouldn't mind having a great spouse or having a good salary. Not a high-stress situation. It's win/win no matter what you pick.

2. Avoidant-Avoidant conflict = both options are unappealing.... For simplicity's sake, let's kind of do the opposite of #1 & #2. The genie says, either #1, you have to marry a butt-ugly, horrible jerk (stressful) or never have sufficient salary to sustain you or your family (also stressful). This is a lose/lose situation. Either way, life's going to suck.
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3. Aproach-Avoidant conflict = there's some good & bad in a singular goal. Let's say an individual's looking at one goal (#1). Before he says, "#1 please" to the genie, he sees some drawbacks. Imagine a guy thinking, "Sure, I get to have a smoking hot spouse. That's great... but forever!? That's a long time to be with someone.... oh man, what if she snores." It's a win some, lose some scenario for 1 goal.

4. Double Approach-Avoidant conflict = there's some good & bad for two goals. If the choice is the genie grants you #1 & #2 or nothing, you think about option #1's approach-avoidant conflict as discussed in (3) and the positive & negatives of #2 (Sure, I'll be able to survive, but what if I'd rather have some money to spend on my friends and family, too?). 2 goals & a win some, lose some scenario for both.
 
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Let's say you have (2) goals. Goal #1: be forever married to a beautiful, faithful spouse. Goal #2: always have just enough of a salary to be able to be comfortable.

1. Approach-Approach conflict = both goals are appealing. If a genie says, you may pick 1 or 2, you wouldn't mind having a great spouse or having a good salary. Not a high-stress situation. It's win/win no matter what you pick.

2. Avoidant-Avoidant conflict = both options are unappealing.... For simplicity's sake, let's kind of do the opposite of #1 & #2. The genie says, either #1, you have to marry a butt-ugly, horrible jerk (stressful) or never have sufficient salary to sustain you or your family (also stressful). This is a lose/lose situation. Either way, life's going to suck.
____________

3. Aproach-Avoidant conflict = there's some good & bad in a singular goal. Let's say an individual's looking at one goal (#1). Before he says, "#1 please" to the genie, he sees some drawbacks. Imagine a guy thinking, "Sure, I get to have a smoking hot spouse. That's great... but forever!? That's a long time to be with someone.... oh man, what if she snores." It's a win some, lose some scenario for 1 goal.

4. Double Approach-Avoidant conflict = there's some good & bad for two goals. If the choice is the genie grants you #1 & #2 or nothing, you think about option #1's approach-avoidant conflict as discussed in (3) and the positive & negatives of #2 (Sure, I'll be able to survive, but what if I'd rather have some money to spend on my friends and family, too?). 2 goals & a win some, lose some scenario for both.

Awesome that makes perfect sense. Thank you for that!
 
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