RPol

10+ Year Member
Dec 23, 2008
4
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Here's the low down. I'm a junior and I am applying after senior year. I go to a top rated private university.
cGPA 3.1
sGPA 2.9

basically a bad first semester, then everything else has been much better
bio 1 = B-
bio 2 = A-
chem 1 = C
chem 2 = B
math 1 = C
math 2 = B
orgo 1 = B+
orgo 2 = B+
genetics = B-
biochem = C+
biochem retake = B+
physics 1 = B+
anatomy = B
all other non science classes B+ and a few A- (nothing lower)

MCAT = 34R

2 years clinical research
3 years EMT on paid and volunteer ambulances
3 years on campus EMT
a year volunteering in the emergency room

Assume that my average for the next 3 semester is about a 3.3. Would I stand any chance of MD?
 

HeatherMD

Queen of Passiveagressiva
10+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2008
348
0
Canada
Status
Pre-Medical
With a 3.1 thus far and a 3.3 expected from here on out?

Sorry, but probably not. Your pre-req average looks pretty dismal -- you're highest grade is an A- in biology =(

Nice MCAT though. And 2yrs of research is solid.
 

RPol

10+ Year Member
Dec 23, 2008
4
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
the only C's I got were first semester of freshman year. Even then, I scored 3.0 or higher in equivalent or harder classes. After the first semester I haven't gotten below a 3.0 GPA with my average floating around a 3.2
 
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HeatherMD

Queen of Passiveagressiva
10+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2008
348
0
Canada
Status
Pre-Medical
the only C's I got were first semester of freshman year. Even then, I scored 3.0 or higher in equivalent or harder classes. After the first semester I haven't gotten below a 3.0 GPA with my average floating around a 3.2
Yeah, but that's still not good enough..
 

Disambiguation

10+ Year Member
Jul 11, 2008
66
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Friend connection: my friend applied in a recent cycle and had around the same GPA as you. The only difference is that she scored a 40 on her MCATS and has already gotten two acceptances. I hope this makes you feel somewhat better.

Edit: Sorry. Six points is a lot. If you nudge it up there to a 3.3-3.4 I'm sure you'll get in somewhere if you apply widely and broadly. Try applying to DO schools perhaps as safeties?
 

RPol

10+ Year Member
Dec 23, 2008
4
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Your GPA is not competitive. You need to raise your standards. The average GPA for medical school applicants is around a 3.7.

You need to accept nothing less than an "A" in your classes. I suggest spending two years taking upper level science courses to improve your GPA. You will need to prove to an admissions committee that you can manage the course load in medical school. According to your current academic record, you are unable to do so.

Nice MCAT, BTW. You must have a solid grasp of the material. Why the discepancy between MCAT and science courses?
The main problem arises from the fact that the college sets the standard average for classes at a C+ as per the registrars website, so most, if not all professors follow this. unfortunately, most med schools don't care about this. In most of my exams the class average (of about 300 kids) is 50-60. To get an A, I would need to score in the top 20 scores of the class, which usually hover around 90-100 from the grade distribution curves the professors release, so I am performing at the range of 70-85 which is a B/B+.

What I was thinking about doing was possibly entering into a science heavy bachelors degree program to show the med schools that I can succeed consistently in science programs, and it will also raise my science and cumulative GPA. When doing this program I won't have to wrory also about my research and extracurriculars which will free up about 20 hours of my week.
 

Disambiguation

10+ Year Member
Jul 11, 2008
66
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I see an upward trend in every single subject area. My personal opinion is that you have a shot of getting into somewhere as long as you apply broadly. But I also tend to be more optimistic then most people on this site. By the way, could you take basic Math courses to raise your BCPM? Like: Intro to Stats or Mathematical Logic. I personally really liked Genetics but our grading system is nowhere as ridiculous as yours.

I definitely sympathize though even though I would not bring up the issue in an interview. With solid LORs from doctors you've shadowed and a good interview, I don't see why not. Then again HeatherMD appears to be more on top of her game than I am as far as Medical Applications are going.

Stick in there. I have faith in how you're doing. :thumbup:
 

WannaBePreMed

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Aug 20, 2008
534
1
Status
Pre-Optometry
I know you have the ability to get a 4.0 this year. You just have to be clutch and do your best. I think you can possibly end up with a 3.3 or even a 3.4 which will (with you EC) definitely give you a chance at MD school. I know this may sound cheesy but this is your moment and you need to take it. :xf::luck::xf:
 

HeatherMD

Queen of Passiveagressiva
10+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2008
348
0
Canada
Status
Pre-Medical
Excuse me, this ranking system sounds terrible. Mind telling me which college this is?
Where do you go that it's NOT like that?

My university sets the average at a B-, and most classes score an average of 65, making the distribution the same as the OP's. Getting an A is the top 20% of the class (top 7% receives A+, top 13% after them get an A).

It's not a terrible ranking system, it's quite normal.
 

JeetKuneDo

10+ Year Member
Oct 25, 2008
2,347
21
Status
Medical Student
OP, I'm a junior and planning on applying by the end of my senior year as well. You gotta buckle down and study and find a way to get those A's. My school is similar, and I was in a similar situation two quarters ago by never quite being able to get that 4.0 in any class I took. What are your study habits; do you take advantage of office hours? I think you need to set your mindset and first believe that you CAN get an A instead of only settling for 3.3. Your MCAT is great. If I can get an A in a class, you definitely can. 34 shows that. Just believe in yourself. :thumbup:
 

Mobius1985

10+ Year Member
Apr 4, 2007
3,484
1
I was thinking about possibly entering into a science heavy bachelors degree program to show the med schools that I can succeed consistently in science programs, and it will also raise my science and cumulative GPA.
Can you change schools now so you don't have to do so much damage control?
 

hedgehog1

10+ Year Member
Dec 13, 2008
90
0
Status
Pre-Medical
The main problem arises from the fact that the college sets the standard average for classes at a C+ as per the registrars website, so most, if not all professors follow this. unfortunately, most med schools don't care about this. In most of my exams the class average (of about 300 kids) is 50-60. To get an A, I would need to score in the top 20 scores of the class, which usually hover around 90-100 from the grade distribution curves the professors release, so I am performing at the range of 70-85 which is a B/B+.

What I was thinking about doing was possibly entering into a science heavy bachelors degree program to show the med schools that I can succeed consistently in science programs, and it will also raise my science and cumulative GPA. When doing this program I won't have to wrory also about my research and extracurriculars which will free up about 20 hours of my week.
Unfortunately, I think that's how grading works at most schools. That's how it is at my school anyway...

I'm confused. Why would you stop your ECs and research when starting this new program?
 

bluesmd

10+ Year Member
Aug 18, 2008
2,206
4
is in countdown mode
Status
Pre-Medical
yeah a C+ is usually the average at my school too. sometimes professors are nice and make it B-.

to the OP: do not be doubtful. no one can believe in you if you can't believe in yourself. and you will never make it if you have doubts. work hard focus on your goal and your future classes. do not focus on your past grades you cannot change them now. just do the best you can and believe that you can make it. good luck
 

Disambiguation

10+ Year Member
Jul 11, 2008
66
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Where do you go that it's NOT like that?

My university sets the average at a B-, and most classes score an average of 65, making the distribution the same as the OP's. Getting an A is the top 20% of the class (top 7% receives A+, top 13% after them get an A).

It's not a terrible ranking system, it's quite normal.

Top 20 and top 20% are two very big differences when you go to a large state school where classes are like filled with 350 students. Rochester is a private school so perhaps Top 20 may correlate with top 20% since the classes should be a lot smaller.
 

alibai3ah

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 24, 2008
1,422
1
Status
Pre-Medical
I disagree with HeatherMD. I think adcomms will notice the discrepancy between your MCAT scores and GPA, and give you the benefit of doubt in terms of how difficult the classes were. Sure your gpa is not too strong, but if you can get a 3.3 cumulative with a 34 MCAT. You have a very good chance at lower/middle tier medical schools. Hopefully you have an upward trend though in those science classes....And with your EC's.. you could get an acceptance or two. Take as many science classes as u can, and get that GPA up with straight A's from now on. If all else fails, you could always do an SMP.
 

alibai3ah

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 24, 2008
1,422
1
Status
Pre-Medical
Where do you go that it's NOT like that?

My university sets the average at a B-, and most classes score an average of 65, making the distribution the same as the OP's. Getting an A is the top 20% of the class (top 7% receives A+, top 13% after them get an A).

It's not a terrible ranking system, it's quite normal.
He said Top 20 scores which usually lie between 90-100. This means the twenty best students....This is quite different from top 20% which would incorporate a greater number of people in the range to get an A. It would only be the same if the class had 100 students exactly. The OP mentioned that the classes have 300 or so students in the class, which means that approximately 7% of the class receives A's. Thats terrible....but if it helps, medical schools do look at difficulty of undergrad and take it into consideration.
 
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