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Dropped organic chemistry II to study for MCAT, ochem, and the calculus certification. What to do?

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birchtree47

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Just about an hour ago, I made the risky and impulsive decision to drop out of ochem II, as this was the last day that it was possible to do so without it showing up on your transcript. At the moment, I have 13 credit hours, and I am in the second semester of my sophomore year. The reason I dropped was because I did not feel ready for ochem II, and did not feel like I had a good grasp on the material from ochem I, and therefore did not think I could manage it along with my other classes. I'm still somewhat regretting the drop, and am at a loss of what to do. Now, an endless amount of free time has opened up for me to prepare for the future. At the moment, I still have to get biochem, physics II+ and ochem II + lab out of the way, along with a calculus certification. This likely means that I will now be taking a gap year, as I don't see how I can do all of this before the regular application cycle. At the moment, my plan is to create a study schedule to prepare for ochem (using the ochem as a second language book), as well as studying for the MCAT and calculus. I am also considering taking up scribing this semester, although I am not sure exactly when I would do that. Does anyone have any similar situations, and if so do you have any advice on building a study schedule while also taking classes? Thank you and I appreciate the help.
 
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The MCAT is heavily grounded in biochem, and although concepts from ochem aren't necessarily on the MCAT, ochem 1 will help you heavily. Remember that taking these classes is studying for the MCAT in it of itself. If you're taking a gap year, I don't see a reason to start worrying about your MCAT right now, especially given your academic situation. Focus on rebuilding your ochem foundation. It's really futile to try and take the MCAT before this many prereqs are done.
 

birchtree47

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The MCAT is heavily grounded in biochem, and although concepts from ochem aren't necessarily on the MCAT, ochem 1 will help you heavily. Remember that taking these classes is studying for the MCAT in it of itself. If you're taking a gap year, I don't see a reason to start worrying about your MCAT right now, especially given your academic situation. Focus on rebuilding your ochem foundation. It's really futile to try and take the MCAT before this many prereqs are done.
Thanks for the advice. I wasn't planning on taking the MCAT till the end of next fall or the end of next spring (2022). It still must be useful to study for it right now with all the time that has opened up, right?
 

JimKimSlim

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@gyngyn Move this to MCAT forum?

I think there are two ways to approach this.

1. Finish all the pre-reqs and take the MCAT during your gap year. Should take about 4-months to review, practice problems, and practice tests.

2. Study the pre-reqs that you haven't studied during summer break with KA and Anki, do practice problems and practice FL's on weekends, and take the MCAT next spring (2022). Much longer, but lighter in load since you're spreading your studying materials out over a span of 9-10 months.

I would like to mention how HELPFUL KA is. I never took PHYS I and II and PSYCH (high-yield for C/P and P/S), but I attribute my success with those two sections (131, 130) to KA videos and Anki.

DM me, if you need help planning the actual study schedule.
 

birchtree47

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If I were to take the second route (taking the MCAT at the end of spring semester), do you think that I should start studying now? If so, can I please have your advice on planning the study schedule?
@gyngyn Move this to MCAT forum?

I think there are two ways to approach this.

1. Finish all the pre-reqs and take the MCAT during your gap year. Should take about 4-months to review, practice problems, and practice tests.

2. Study the pre-reqs that you haven't studied during summer break with KA and Anki, do practice problems and practice FL's on weekends, and take the MCAT next spring (2022). Much longer, but lighter in load since you're spreading your studying materials out over a span of 9-10 months.

I would like to mention how HELPFUL KA is. I never took PHYS I and II and PSYCH (high-yield for C/P and P/S), but I attribute my success with those two sections (131, 130) to KA videos and Anki.

DM me, if you need help planning the actual study schedule
 

Mr.Blackdoc.5

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IMO I think it’s invaluable to take ochem 2 because that’s where you learn the biochem relevant mechanisms eg Aldol condensations and carbohydrate derivative stuff as well as iirc NMR. OP, recommend you use Carey organic chemistry to self-teach yourself the subject. You’ll become a whiz after reading that through.
I caution against anyone taking the mcat without orgo II. You hear these horror stories of folks getting orgo heavy tests having not adequately prepared.. on my exam day i was very happy to have taken orgo II
 

JimKimSlim

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If I were to take the second route (taking the MCAT at the end of spring semester), do you think that I should start studying now? If so, can I please have your advice on planning the study schedule?
No, you should focus on your class grades first. I suggest taking the summer break to study all those pre-reqs. If you keep up with a rigid study schedule, it shouldn’t take more than 2 months to knock down all those pre-reqs. Your biggest hurdle will be biochemistry, since it involves a mixture of synthesis and intuition that you only acquire through exams and practice problems.

Once you study all the pre#reqs, you can start reviewing MCAT contents with a steady schedule. 4 months before your test, you should be doing practice problems/FL’s. 2 months prior, AAMC materials only. DM me, if you want more details.
 
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