Dismiss Notice
SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community!

EPPP practice test scores for those who passed

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by QClinician, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. bts2017

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    MD/PhD Student
    Hi all - does anyone have access to practice exams that they would be willing to share (am willing to pay for them!). I am hoping to solely study via taking practice tests and studying the answers...thanks so much.
     
  2. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. bts2017

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    MD/PhD Student
    Does anyone have thoughts about primarily using practice exams to prepare for the EPPP (I am taking it for the firs time)? I am planning to take old practice tests and make notes on everything I am unfamiliar with, and then use academic review's online program for the 30 days before I take the exam, again focusing on practice tests and explanations. Plus the EPPP psych prep flashcards. I am afraid to start reading the books and taking notes on the content because I feel like I could do that forever and it might not be super helpful..
     
  4. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
    Psychologist

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    7,714
    Likes Received:
    5,682
    Status:
    Psychologist
    Just a note of advice. If you have a question, just ask it once and do a thread search. Please do not resurrect multiple dead threads to ask the same exact question. People will be less likely to want to help you if you are an annoyance to them.
     
  5. Grey468

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hello all!

    This thread was incredibly helpful for me in preparing for the EPPP. Since I took it for the first time yesterday and passed with a score of 596 (NY converted score of 82), I wanted to pay it forward! Hopefully my story will help someone on the other side of this exam.

    First off, this exam is a beast. I've seen some people on here calling it "easy" and saying that you can "just do x and skate by." That just seems like arrogance to me and is poor advice. That being said, the beast can be conquered if you study in a way that is BOTH 1) effective for YOU and 2) effective with regard to the very particular style of the exam. Referring to the former, people will try to tell you how to best study, but rest assured that you have been studying for exams for many years and you alone know what works for you. As for the latter, the exam has a style that is unique, and it's important to familiarize yourself with that before going in to the real thing.

    As for me, I studied for about 10 weeks, 6 intensely. I borrowed the AATBS materials from a friend and inherited a wealth of materials including audios from PsychPrep and practice tests from Academic Review, PsychPrep, and some unknown sources. I read all of the AATBS books from cover to cover, then took 3 practice tests. All were Academic Review because my friend believed those to be most representative of how the actual EPPP questions were presented. Each time I reviewed the answers I either had gotten correct due to an educated guess or had gotten incorrect. My scores were 56, 60, and 59. At that point, I felt utterly demoralized: I kept hearing "as long as you're getting 65-70+ on practice tests you should be okay in the actual exam." The test was days away and I knew I wouldn't have time to bring my score up that much, or at all. I considered moving the test but also wanted to give myself the chance to put it behind me. So, I decided to put the practice tests aside and go back to review. I figured out the topics that kept bringing my score down and reviewed the corresponding index cards and listened to a couple of audios. I did that for a few days, and then took the first 225 questions of the retired EPPP questions (linked below). I got a 75 and felt a ton better.

    These questions show you the style in which the EPPP assesses your knowledge which - in my experience - was largely "Can you apply your knowledge of psychology to figure out the answer?" For example, some questions ask you to identify research trends when it may be unlikely you've seen those studies. You won't be reinforced for remembering concepts and theories so you can vomit them out when asked directly about them. At the same time, you can't effectively apply knowledge you don't have or don't remember. In my humble opinion, the retired questions were most representative of my readiness and it's a huge mistake not to take them. I recommend taking them after studying to get a true sense of how you may perform on the real thing.

    So, a few take-aways from my experience:
    1) Study in the way that has worked for YOU. You are the expert on that.
    2) Take as many practice tests as you can. It helps to enrich your knowledge base and, depending on the source, helps you apply that knowledge which is what you'll be doing on the real exam. It also gives you a sense of your areas for further study.
    3) Your scores on the practice tests matter, but don't rest more weight on them than they deserve. I've known people who passed but just barely when they were getting really high scores on practice tests, and then several people like me who never breached a score in the low 60s and still passed with room to spare.
    4) After you are at the tail-end of your prep, take the retired EPPP questions. Here is the link:

    http://www.modernpsychologist.com/v2/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/EPPP-Retired_Test_Questions.pdf

    5) Passing this test is about mastering the ability to apply the knowledge you have. If you happen to fail it, it doesn't mean anything about you personally. It just means that you either didn't review the material effectively enough or you didn't master how to apply that knowledge to the questions. You have every right to be sad, angry, etc. and give yourself the space to feel that. And then, dust yourself off and realize that whichever of the two issues I mentioned above applies to you, it can be remedied.

    Best of luck, everyone! And thank you to those who added to this list before me and who unknowingly provided me with comfort leading up to my date with the beast.
     
    himala and freckles333 like this.
  6. NewMember90210

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    I wanted to share my experience with the EPPP since this thread was very helpful in my preparation for the exam.

    I passed on my first try with a score of ~ 580 (NY converted ~ 80). Overall, I studied quite casually for the exam beginning in October of last year. I acquired different materials but I believe that only a few were critical (*) to my passing the test. Below are a list of prep materials I used:

    (*) Modern Psychologist’s EPPP study guide – I thought his study guide was excellent and covered 90% of what was covered on the exam. I read his guide 3x attentively although I did not take copious notes or make flash cards on the material. This guide is absolutely worth the money.

    (*) Psych Prep audio CDs – this was great to listen to while commuting, walking to/from work, etc. Listening to the CDs were a great way to passively learn the information. I went through most of set 2x and reviewed any sections I felt I was weak in.

    (*) Old practice tests
    – hand-me-down tests from friends – not sure where they were from. Also take the Items from the Previous Exam if you can. I did not score beyond 70% on any exam…most of my scores were in the low to mid 60s, maybe a stray score in the 50s. You must get your hands on the practice tests. I was tempted to buy the online practice tests offered by AATBS, PsychPrep, etc. but I couldn’t justify the cost – I don’t think you need to buy these tests/packages to pass.

    EPPP flash card app – I bought this app with the intention of using it almost exclusively for my prep but I felt kind of overwhelmed with it and I stopped using it after a handful of attempts. But if you do well with flashcards, definitely get this app.

    EPPP Fundamentals book – too basic. Casually read a quarter of it and stopped.

    EPPP app (based on the Fundamentals book)
    – the style of questions asked on the app are not representative of the items on the exam. The daily questions you get are a joke. Despite all this, it was nice to have an app that could help me prep – helpful when you’re waiting in line at the grocery store. Don’t think it’s worth the money though.

    I also had notes on different subject areas geared toward EPPP prep and they were fantastic for review.


    My goal was to study enough so I could pass comfortably – I did not want to ace it and I was reluctant to put in any more hours of studying than I needed to. I studied casually over the past several months, but there were several weeks (6-8 weeks) in which I did not study anything whatsoever. I was feeling very nervous about this so I took the PEPPO a few weeks prior to my scheduled date and passed (wish they gave you the actual score). Taking the PEPPO before you start studying might even be helpful to identify the areas you need to work on the most. Overall I think I was most productive in terms of studying once I actually scheduled the test and could count down the days to the big day. A few days before the exam, I spent 5-6 hours per day going over the material again in case I missed anything. Also, after going through old threads and practicing on old exams, I found that if I wanted to get a rough estimate of my NY converted score, I would add 8% to my actual test score (YMMV).

    If you are worried about this test, know that it is surmountable. Follow a study method that works with you and don’t overwhelm yourself with so many different sources – pick a few solid ones and stick with it. Memorize concepts that are known to be asked, have shown up on previous exams, etc. If you are scoring within the mid-60s or if you pass the PEPPO, I think you are good to schedule the EPPP.
     
    freckles333 likes this.
  7. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
    Psychologist

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    7,714
    Likes Received:
    5,682
    Status:
    Psychologist
    Not arrogance, just the reality of our situations. Many of us come from programs with 100%, or 95%+ pass rates over 10+ years. Some programs simply select students and prepare them for the field differently.
     
  8. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2005
    Messages:
    2,131
    Likes Received:
    1,346
    [QUOTE="NewMember90210, post: 19054105, member: 835997

    (*) Modern Psychologist’s EPPP study guide – I thought his study guide was excellent and covered 90% of what was covered on the exam. I read his guide 3x attentively although I did not take copious notes or make flash cards on the material. This guide is absolutely worth the money.
    P.[/QUOTE]

    One post, and is promoting the product of a member who got banned....
     
    singasongofjoy likes this.
  9. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
    Psychologist

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    7,714
    Likes Received:
    5,682
    Status:
    Psychologist
    I've never checked the site out, but considering his presentation here on SDN, I always imagined it was akin to what you'd see on InfoWars.
     
  10. NewMember90210

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    I have another account which I did not want to use because I do not want to be identified.

    I'm aware of the strong bias against Modern Psychologist. If someone chooses not to use his materials, they don't have to. But it is disingenuous to suggest that my entire post is under question because I used his study guide.
     
  11. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2005
    Messages:
    2,131
    Likes Received:
    1,346
    Uh, I'll go ahead and take my advice about being disingenuous from someone who isn't using a throwaway.

    I question it, so I feel pretty honest in saying so.
     
  12. AppsAintNoThang

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2014
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    402
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    One post, and is promoting the product of a member who got banned....[/QUOTE]


    I'm confused since I thought that study guide was free. At least it was easily found online for me and I hadn't paid for it.
     
  13. Mbr232

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychologist
    (*) Modern Psychologist’s EPPP study guide – I thought his study guide was excellent and covered 90% of what was covered on the exam. I read his guide 3x attentively although I did not take copious notes or make flash cards on the material. This guide is absolutely worth the money.


    can you tell me a bit more about the study guide that you found so useful. name? ISBN? where you got it?
     
  14. siamesekitten

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2012
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    267
    Status:
    Post Doc
    Not the person who posted, but here it is. New EPPP Study Guide 2015 - Modern Psychologist

    My understanding is that it used to be about $30, but is now offered for free.

    I know that many on these boards dislike Modern Psychologist, and this is anecdotal, but I know several people who have utilized this study guide (in addition to practice exams, of course), and did just fine on the EPPP.
     
  15. Grey468

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2
    I come from such a program as well and passed my first time out. Respectfully, it is one's personal judgment that the test is "easy." Many people come onto this thread looking for support for different reasons, such as lack of confidence in their test-taking skills or feeling demoralized after having failed the test one or more times. I can't imagine a situation in which hearing an assessment that is not objective would be helpful to anyone.
     
  16. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  17. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
    Psychologist

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    7,714
    Likes Received:
    5,682
    Status:
    Psychologist
    I would respectfully argue that the extremely high pass rate at reputable programs is objective evidence as to the difficulty of the test.
     
  18. foreverbull

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2015
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    312
    Speaking to another possibility in the differences in test experiences, it's standard to have multiple forms for many widely-used professional exams; I don't think it's unreasonable to also think that the forms could have varying difficulty and scoring methods that are more lenient for the harder versions. Pure speculation, of course, but may be one factor accounting for some of the vastly different reports about difficulty from test-takers. Thoughts?
     
  19. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
    Psychologist

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    7,714
    Likes Received:
    5,682
    Status:
    Psychologist
    It's standardized for the most part across forms/cohorts taking the test, though, so theoretically, more difficult forms would even out in the wash. At least in terms of passing or failing.
     
  20. foreverbull

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2015
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    312
    Right; I'm not saying that more people would fail a "harder" version who would have passed an "easier" one (unless one has extreme test anxiety and unluckily gets the harder one). I would imagine that an objectively harder form would be scored in such a way as to account for the disadvantage so you still pass at the same rate as the other forms.
     
  21. boomshakalaka

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2014
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    66
    Status:
    Psychologist
    I'm happy to report that I passed with a 598. I used recent AATBS materials (books, online domain and section quizzes, audio) that were gifted to me, in addition to handed down practice tests (psychprep and AR), study guides, and the flashcard app.

    My AATBS scores were 64, 69, 70, 64, 66, 67, 67, 67. I took Psychprep tests B, C, and E, and scored 67, 67, 60, respectively. Test E was absolutely ridiculous so I didn't put too much stock into that one. I also took the PEPPO two days before my exam and passed it. I found the PEPPO to be incredibly helpful with regard to getting a glimpse of how questions were worded.

    I started reading the books in January with the hope of taking the exam in April, but made the brilliant decision of getting a dog a week into my studies. I kept up the studying until about the middle of February and didn't pick things up again until late April.

    Beginning in May I read through each chapter, completed the fill in the blank sections, and took the sections quizzes. The section quizzes were super helpful in reinforcing what I had just read. I started taking a practice test or two a day about a week before my exam and relistening to the audio CDs. I had started to take the retired questions exam but was honestly getting a little burnt out taking tests and stopped it. I reread and listened to the audio of low scoring sections from the PEPPO the night before and day of the test.

    I think the practice test method is viable if you take the time to review the questions and have a relatively sound foundation of the knowledge they're asking you, which I didn't have until I read the books.

    Coming from the AATBS side, my advice would be to read the study materials, and then take a crap ton of practice test later in your studies. Also, listen to the audio! I never thought I'd be one to listen to EPPP audio in my car, but I'm glad I swallowed my pride and did so. The topics covered in the audio kind of clued me into concepts likely to show up on the exam.

    I actually felt the exam was pretty straightforward and not too difficult. I think part of that was because of my preparation and because the questions were so much more clearly worded than the practice tests. I had a good feeling part way through that I was going to pass but also thought, "If I fail, I have no idea how I can score higher or be better prepared."

    It really helped to have a study buddy to go over concepts with and throw out pop quizzes to lol. Doesn't have to be anything formal, but if you find a fellow fellow or colleague to check in with that would be helpful. I share an office with mine so we had plenty of time to review things. Having a study partner also keeps you motivated to remain consistent.

    Ok, I'm tired of writing. If anyone wants more info just ask!
     
    #869 boomshakalaka, Jul 14, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
  22. BuckeyeLove

    BuckeyeLove Forensic Psychologist
    Psychologist

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2014
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    132
    Status:
    Psychologist
  23. boomshakalaka

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2014
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    66
    Status:
    Psychologist
    thanks! representin
     
  24. PhDToBe

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    90
    Status:
    Psychologist
    I recently passed with a score in the 600s. I used recent AATBS books; AATBS and Psych Prep audio in the car; practice tests; and various visuals, charts, outlines, etc. I had flash cards that were helpful, but I didn't have many opportunities to use them.

    I started taking tests while reading the AATBS books, then concentrated mostly on practice tests and the visuals/charts/outlines, and reviewed most of the main info in the books again (along with the domain quizzes) the week leading up to the test. My test scores occurred in a slightly odd pattern: I started out in the 50s, got a 64, moved back down to mid-50s, got several low-mid 70s, another 64, and then another one or two in the low 70s. I ended with an 81 on the retired items test. The vast majority of my tests were old (pre-DSM-5), which usually only affected one question per test. I took ~15 tests total.

    I know a lot of people say to only use practice tests, but I'm not sure how much of this material I knew prior to reading about it. (For the record, I come from a Ph.D. program that currently has a 100% EPPP pass rate; I say that only to emphasize that even people from programs with very high pass rates will likely be unfamiliar with much of the information and may need to utilize books in addition to tests.) That being said, I certainly learned a lot from taking and reviewing the tests. The audios were also super helpful. I strongly suggest using tests from various companies so you can become comfortable with different types of questions and scoring systems, as the companies' tests seem to have varying difficulty levels.

    In total, I spent ~3.5 months studying, but it was broken up until the last two months. The only things I would suggest doing differently are reading the books quicker, looking over more outlines and/or possibly making your own, and finding time to utilize the flash cards.

    I found the real test to be fairly difficult. While I recognized most of the concepts, I found the questions to be much more specific than most of those seen on the practice tests. As others said, I was not sure if I had passed after I finished, but I was more certain than not that I did. Unlike others, I did NOT find it to be more straightforward, as there were several oddly-worded questions. I spent about 3 hours and 45 minutes on the test, as well as 5-10 minutes for a break in the middle and 20 to review my flagged items. I typically finished practice tests in 2 hours and 45 minutes, although many of mine were slightly shorter and I did not review items. I think the time difference was due to awareness of this being the "real deal" and distractions from having other test takers and staff present, which is something to keep in mind.

    I did not take the PEPPO because I refused to give the ASPPB any more money and decided the retired items had enough anecdotal predictive validity for me.

    I also suggest studying with someone else, as I found that helpful with regard to the material, the emotional drain of studying, and motivation.

    Finally, I am selling a ton of materials (e.g., AATBS books, many practice tests, audio files, flash cards), so please check the appropriate sticky thread or PM me if you are interested. :)
     
    freckles333 and siamesekitten like this.
  25. President_LeslieKnope

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2014
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    130
    Status:
    Psychologist
    I haven't been on here in a while but I found this thread to be incredibly helpful when preparing for the EPPP so I thought I would come back and share some of my experiences :)

    I passed with a 562 a few months ago (78 NY score) on the first try. I am not a great test-taker, did average on SATs and re-took the GREs 3 times, so I knew I needed extra time to prepare for this beast. I took an initial practice test in mid-December and spent a few weeks hunting for material. I studied from mid-January until I took the test mid-May, with significantly ramped up studying after about mid-March. I read through the AATBS books and took notes along the way, but after the fact I realized that was a big waste of time for me. I got the bulk of my studying done through listening to the audio CDs during my commute and by taking practice tests. I probably took about 15+ over the course of my studying as well as practice quizzes. Going through both answers that I got right and wrong were key for me - I wanted to make sure that I truly understood what I was getting right (and wrong). My first practice test was a 45 (yikes), I moved into the low 50s early in my studying, and hit the 60s about half way through. I only passed 2-3 tests close to my actual EPPP and those were the PsychPrep tests B-D. I did not pass a single AATBS or AR practice test FWIW. I also did not pay for any material (used hand me downs) except for the $30 EPPP app. I ended up barely using this app but it was nice supplemental studying here and there.

    This has been mentioned before, but it is key to find out what the best study method is for YOU. I started off reading books, making index cards, and taking notes and realized that was not helpful for me at all. It took me about a month to realize what the most helpful technique for me was. Also, the EPPP took a giant toll on my mental health. I think this happens to a lot of people. I was depressed and lethargic for months and always felt guilty if I was doing anything other than studying. It's been 2 1/2 months since my test and I feel like I still haven't fully recovered from it. It's really important to make sure you engage in a lot of self-care during this process. I made sure to give myself 1 day off from studying a week if I could in order to take a break and consolidate. Finding support in other people going through the same process was also incredibly helpful. Good luck to those studying!
     
    freckles333 and siamesekitten like this.
  26. Phipps

    Phipps Post-Doctoral Fellow

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2011
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    117
    Anybody here took the online PsychPrep workshop and score somewhat low as I did, 58%? The test was hard and I wonder how representative the score is. Thanks!
     
  27. foreverbull

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2015
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    312
    Earlier in this thread several people note that they scored in the 50s-70s on practice tests but still passed. It really depends on the test company, but Psychprep's practice quizzes/tests are hard, according to a colleague who used them and scored in the same range but passed the EPPP.
     
    Phipps likes this.
  28. Phipps

    Phipps Post-Doctoral Fellow

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2011
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    117
    Thanks! I too think PP test are hard but the system is sophisticated and helpful. So, I am hopeful ;-)
     
    foreverbull likes this.
  29. Psych Moon

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychologist
    Hi, I am new to this chat (sorry for the misspeling since my primary language is not English), but I am reaching out to this mean because I took the EPPP few weeks ago and I didn't passed it (470 scaled score). I feel totally confuse since I study for good 6 months (25-30 hours per week). I use pychpreep material (only the written material) and youtube videos that I personally select related to the test topics. I didn't really practice too many test question only the one provided by modernpsychologist, which claim to have free retired test questions. However, now that I am reading your posts and the different study materials/methods that people who claim have passed the EPPP, I am totally confuse and without any kind of direction in what to do next to pass the test. I don't know what else to do!!, I really know all the concepts and I just feel that the questions of the real EPPP test were totaly foreing to me. It's there some kind of black market were I could find the specific material covered in this fiasco test? Where I can find retired test questions or I don't know what else :( PLEASE HELP!!!!! (I promise that if I pass it because of you I will send you a nice present :)
     
  30. foreverbull

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2015
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    312
    What you're asking for is inappropriate and unethical, especially in a forum with licensed psychologists reading/moderating threads.

    What you can do is ask if people have hand-me-down practice tests to share, post an ad in the "wanted" section of this site for old practice tests that are legal to share, or just purchase online tests from psychprep or another test company. It sounds like you don't want to pay for online test access which is expensive, but may be necessary if you failed the EPPP without it. I'm sorry to hear that you failed, but you need to change your study materials and/or how you study, not expect someone to help you pass unethically.
     
    #878 foreverbull, Oct 15, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
    Psych Moon likes this.
  31. freckles333

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Psychologist
    Hi all!:)

    I have tracked this forum over the last months and found it to be informative and encouraging. Thank you for everyone who wrote about his/her experiences!

    I studied a little bit less than 6 weeks about 8 hours daily during the week and 4 hours on Saturday and 4 hours on Sunday. I used AATBS books (I read all of the books and created summaries with visual aids, key points), PsychPrep Audio CDs (I listened to all the tracks while I was driving, while I was cooking, while I was taking a shower or while I was at the gym) and the Phone app from StudyPsych.

    I took approximately 12 practice exams (AATBS and PsychPrep) and my scores were between 60% and 85% (Exam number 8 was my highest score).

    Despite feeling like I had prepared very well for the exam, I walked out convinced I had failed. The exam is very tricky, I guessed on many questions and I didn´t have time to review the answers. My husband was waiting for me outside the exam room, so when we read together the results saying that I passed the exam (I scored 637 on the EPPP, NY conversion 85), I cried a lot. I cried because I studied really hard for many days and I cried because studying all this material in English was not easy for me. My Native Language is Spanish, so I had to do an extra effort to understand completely well all the concepts that I knew (in Spanish) in English.


    I want to encourage everyone to believe that if you STUDY HARD, you will pass! It is also important to surround yourself with people who support you and love you. In my case, is my lovely husband and my parents! Thank you so much Manel!


    At the end of the day, it is about effort, perseverance and sacrifice.
    Good luck everyone!
    Mucha suerte a todos!
     
  32. treetop

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychologist
    Hello....I took my second PEPPP test at the testing center and got a 523. My last scores on AATBS were 64, 70 and 68. I am wondering if I can take the EPPP in 3.5 weeks? I study 36hours a week. If I dont take it then, the next slot at the testing center is in 9 weeks. I am not sure what to do. Anyone have any previous experience with PEPPP scores and AATBS and passing the EPPP that can shed some light on this? thanks!
     
  33. foreverbull

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2015
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    312
    I can't speak from taking the PEPPP, but I'd say if you passed the practice test and you're studying such a high number of hours per week, you should be ready in 3.5 weeks. Why not get it out of the way instead of waiting over 2 months when you're pretty well prepared?
     
  34. treetop

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychologist
    because ASPPB says the practice test is old questions and its NOT an indicator to passing the EPPP, even though I did very well. thats why I am asking those who actually passed and have experience with this thing. thanks
     
  35. singasongofjoy

    Psychologist

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2014
    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    446
    Status:
    Post Doc
    Of course they say that, because they don't want people getting all up in arms like "well I passed the PEPPP and you should just count that score" as I'm sure some nutty people would try to do if they said it was comparable. But they wouldn't offer it if it wasn't pretty comparable. If you're doing pretty well on the AATBS, which you are, I think you'll be fine. The AATBS questions were so much harder than most of the EPPP questions.
     
  36. doglove22

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Post Doc
    Hi All,

    I reviewed this thread numerous times while preparing for the EPPP and it was very helpful for me! I've been studying since September (intensely for just one month) and my scores on AATBS practice exams for this month have ranged from 54-75% (last three scores prior to taking the exam 63, 60, and 75 all taken within the same week). I just passed and wanted to share. There's hope!! Good luck studying!
     
    Panda44 and cantstocans like this.
  37. himala

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2017
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    6
    Got 567 for my first attempt with the EPPP. Yehey-passed!
    But I also made sure to get 70% minimum on any practice tests I did. I also passed both of the practice tests ($65 ones) offered by Pearson.
     
  38. SpacePsych

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    8
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    Thank you to everyone in this thread, it was extremely helpful in guiding me through this process. I wanted to make sure I gave back. Hopefully this is as helpful as it was to me!

    Starting with study methods: I registered back at the end of September just about a month into starting postdoc, but only really started focusing on studying at the beginning of November. Approximately 8 weeks or so, I studied every weekend about 8-16 hours. I listened to audio mp3s almost daily.

    I purchased AATBS materials and read through the chapters once thoroughly. I reviewed some sections I was less familiar with. I also received a free stats online workshop which I found extremely helpful as a refresher. I took the assessment test and all 8 TestMaster tests only once. I reviewed my wrong answers, but didn’t feel the need to repeat the test because I knew my score would be inflated because of retesting. I did study mode for the first two, and exam mode for the last six.

    The average of my last 4 AATBS tests were 65% (66%, 65%, 63%, 66%). My scores seemed to steadily increase from the assessment test, and then remain consistent per my last 4. Difficulty definitely fluctuated between exams (Exam 4 and 7 were the most difficult in my opinion).

    I was still nervous because based on this thread I was just barely making the cut off. I purchased the official practice test online by ASPPB (PEPPPO) and earned a Pass. I think they give you a score if you take it in the test center. Online they give you non-anchored breakdowns going from Low to High of their domains. This was helpful in confirming I was good to go for the real exam. If I failed this I would have reconsidered taking it so soon.

    I think the most helpful thing for me was practice tests with AATBS. They were definitely overkill and forced you to learn much more than probably needed. The PEPPO and real EPPP definitely had questions that I found much easier than AATBS, and typically much shorter questions with less route memorization. AATBS tests definitely helped though, because there were very few questions on the EPPP that I totally didn’t recognize the concepts. I found the mp3 audios extremely helpful as well in memorizing concepts and definitely recommend incorporating them into your daily routine. Although, I’m very happy to transition back to music on Spotify...

    The EPPP was intense as expected, and I was worried about my pacing the whole time. I definitely flagged much more questions then i usually did on AATBS. The highlighting and underlining features were very useful. I finished with about an hour to spare and used most of that time to review my flagged questions. The minute between being escorted out, scanning my palm, and checking my ID was nerve-racking. I just wanted to see my score report...

    ...I passed (588)!!! They provide a score report when you are finished. It lists the scaled score and NY converted score (82). I guess they have heard the feedback in this thread as it says in parentheses that the NY score is not a percentage. It does not say pass or fail, so be prepared to ask the center staff to confirm you vision! However, I logged into the Pearson website today and under history is says “Pass” for me. It does not look like you can print a free duplicate score report.

    TLDR: I passed with a 588; used AATBS; studied for about 8 weeks on the weekends, around 100-150 hours total. I found taking exams most helpful, followed by mp3 audio for daily commute, and read through the chapters once; I would recommend taking the PEPPO once if you’re nervous as this boosted my confidence that I was ready to take the exam.

    Good luck everyone!
     
  39. 123EW

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2012
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    100
    It's encouraging reading about so many of you passing the EPPP. I am feeling overwhelmed figuring out how I should approach this. I reached out to several people, but have not been fortunate enough to be gifted any materials other than a few tests (grateful for those, of course!)

    Like many of you, I don't have a lot of extra cash to pay full price, so I am searching Ebay auctions and have a few questions:

    1) for the AATBS study volumes, would older versions be okay? I think the newest is edition is 80, but I see some 77th editions for sale.

    2) several mentioned the PsychPrep exams as being most helpful. Is there anyway to access these without paying full price? $500 is pretty steep.

    3) for PsychPrep audio cd's, is there a certain version I should be looking for, or are they basically all the same?

    I'm also wondering about people's opinions on taking the exam before Feb 15th or after. I read that the test is changing and with slightly less bio and slightly less stats. Those are my stronger areas, but I'm not sure I can pull off studying in 6 weeks.
     
  40. 80mdab

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2016
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Psychologist
    I was making in the mid and upper 60s on practice exams, but I kept failing the EPPP with the NY scaled score of 73 and 73. (By question 100, I was always mentally exhausted and felt burned out.) Then I went back and learned all the test questions and answers by just going over them and over them. I got to the point that I could glance at a question, and I knew what it asked and what the answer was. I listened to the audios over and over and read the pdf study guides. I felt like I knew the material well. So, I took the exam again Dec 11, and I got the NY scaled score of 74 (495). What I found from taking the exam multiple times was that the different versions of the exams do cover different material you find from taking a variety of practice exams (I think I have 15 or so practice exams - maybe more). But there were always questions that I never came across in any material that I studied, and I felt defeated. I am also not a morning person, and taking the exam at 8 a.m. was stressful for me. I couldn't sleep the night before, and then I would be so tired during the exam. With the new year, the testing center started offering new testing hours, so I was able to schedule to take the EPPP at 2 p.m. instead of 8 a.m. I failed with the 74 on Dec 11. Yesterday, I passed with an 82 (593). Therefore, if you are NOT a morning person like me, and your testing center only offers morning exams, it may be worth your time (and money) to drive somewhere else to take the exam in the afternoon.

    The other thing I did different yesterday was this: I divided my scrap paper into 4 sections. In section 1, I wrote the number of the questions I knew the answers to and then above the number, I wrote letters like T (treatment), D (developmental), etc, so I could get an idea of what kind of questions I was getting right. Then I had a section for questions that I knew how to find the answer but would need time to get the answer, and I wrote those numbers down and flagged them. I had a section for questions that I was pretty sure I knew the answer but wasn't 100% sure I was right. Then I had a section of "where the hell did that come from?" After I answered all the questions, I went back and answered the ones that I needed more time to answer but knew I would know the answer. Then I went over the ones I was pretty sure I got right but wanted to go back over (I put stars by some to go back over and others I marked to ignore). Then I went to the ones that I had no idea what the answers were. There were two questions that I noticed 3 answers were similar and 1 was different, so I went with that 1 answer. Then there were a few that I had no idea and just guessed. This strategy worked for me, so I hope that it is helpful to some of you.
     
    #888 80mdab, Jan 5, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2018
  41. Groupthink

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    28
    Taking the EPPP in a month. My practice exam scores are varying wildly. On the AATBS hand-me-down tests I have, I've obtained 61%, 62%, 65%, 61%. On the Academic Review tests, I received a 65%, then a 72%, then another 72%. I find the AATBS tests far more difficult.

    I have no idea if I am ready. I continue to trip up on the most basic of things. When people say the exams are the best way to study, HOW do you approach studying them? Do you just memorize the facts on questions you get wrong?

    Also, will I get my unofficial EPPP score when I walk out of the exam? Or do I need to wait for an official score?
     
  42. foreverbull

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2015
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    312
    You'll get the official score when you walk out (including the NY scaled score).

    Yes, memorize what trips you up, and revisit areas you think you're weakest in and don't have as much memorized. Take final practice tests if you have any left. I had psychprep written materials that I took copious notes on as I read, listened to psychprep audio, and took a total of 5 practice tests, spending around 100 hours total with those materials as a recent grad. But everyone is different in their study methods ...for me, the written materials were essential, just as much as the practice tests were.
     
  43. singasongofjoy

    Psychologist

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2014
    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    446
    Status:
    Post Doc
    I echo what foreverbull said above- everyone has difft study methods. The written materials were v. important for me. I used chart paper to write notes on things I was less familiar with from the written materials, hung them around my house, and reviewed them periodically throughout the week (e.g., while eating my breakfast) even though I really only studied on the weekend. I found some of the charts in teh written materials especially helpful. I need a more organized approach to studying than just reviewing tests where the content is all mixed around. I probably also spent about 100 hours total studying. I realized during taking the practice tests that I needed to force myself to take stretch/snack breaks because my brain just can't hang for that long without a break. Def made a difference during the test- took a break about every 40 minutes and a final break before going back to review all flagged items and my head was much clearer. Still had an hour to spare so plenty of time for breaks IMO.
     
    Therapist4Chnge likes this.
  44. Groupthink

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    28
    Somewhat off-topic, but related to the practice tests:

    I am finding it quite frustrating how there is inconsistent information across tests. For example, one of the questions from a hand-me-down test is as follows:

    "A new therapeutic intervention for heroin addiction is tested in a 6 month study, comparing it to existing treatment programs and a control group. At the end of 3 months the researchers find a dramatic success rate for the experimental treatment with over 75% of the clients maintaining abstinence from heroin, compared to 30% for the other treatment groups and 10% for the control group. What should the researchers do?

    a. inform the other groups of the results and recommend that they begin the new treatment program
    b. inform the other groups of the results and give them the option of receiving the new treatment or continuing with their existing program
    c. not inform the other groups of the results
    d. wait until the conclusion of the study and then offer the other groups the new treatment"




    I chose answer a because, based on other questions I have answered, it is unethical once you have determined the beneficial effects of a new treatment to continue withholding that treatment from control groups. However the answer key says the answer is d, because you need to wait the 6 months before determining that there is an actual success rate.

    IMO that makes zero sense. By this logic, if I have a sore throat and take a painkiller that's supposed to work in 48 hours, and I report that my pain is gone in 24 hours, I am supposed to wait until 48 hours to conclude that the painkiller works. Bizarre.

    There have been multiple instances of this throughout the practice tests. While I recognize that this will have minimal impact on my EPPP performance, it is just another source of frustration in this process.
     
  45. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
    Psychologist

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    7,714
    Likes Received:
    5,682
    Status:
    Psychologist
    D is clearly the best answer here and it isn't even close. This is just a research ethics problem here. This isn't an inconsistency. If the question then asked about what you do once the study period is over, that's a whole different answer.
     
    #893 WisNeuro, Jan 11, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
  46. boomshakalaka

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2014
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    66
    Status:
    Psychologist
    From what I recall from my repressed EPPP studies, answers C and D would make the most sense. When you mention answering similar questions in the past, did those questions deal with programs/interventions that resulted in a reduction in self-harming/dangerous/similar behaviors? I think answer "a" would address those types of questions a little better, but this scenario doesn't seem to be addressing that kind of issue. A little EPPP tip here--don't answer questions based on other questions. Answer based on whatever information is currently presented to you. Once you start injecting additional information things become unnecessarily difficult.
     
  47. psychrat

    psychrat licensed psychologist

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    650
    Status:
    Psychologist


    I have this retired exam too with the answers and the correct answer is D
     
  48. HipHopOPotomus

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2018
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2
    Long time lurker, but thought it was about time to post and share my process and experience of the EPPP. First, I appreciate all who shared information on this thread - especially the thoughtful replies that had solid, detailed info. Good stuff that definitely helped me shape my approach. Here goes...

    Initially, I signed up and took the EPPP (this was 2013) to assist me in landing a postdoc site that involved work as a psych evaluator. Successfully knocked out the jurisprudence exam and turned my eye to the EPPP. My generally approach was to try to do the bare minimum to pass the exam. I recall looking over some free online test prep info and reviewing some class material. My philosophy was that I didn't want to give this one more minute of my time than I needed to. I was just out of my program and it felt reasonable to just give it a go and see what it was all about. In retrospect, I would have benefitted from a few more minutes of time, as I fell just short with a score of 486. Talk about hindsight bias! At least I learned what the exam was like and the areas that I would need to brush up on. This is around the time my professional journey took a turn.

    Unfortunately, the testing postdoc position fell through at the last minute - momentary despair! - but, this ended up being a blessing in disguise. I had just finished my internship with a community mental health agency and accepted a position teaching at an undergrad college. Spent 2013-2014 finishing my dissertation and securing a new postdoc site - this involved cold calling psychologists all across my state until I found someone willing to supervise me. This took a lot of time, but I landed a great experience in a diverse private practice setting. Earned my doctorate in fall of 2014 and diligently chipped away at postdoc hours over 2015-2017 while working full time as an assistant professor. Combined hours from the on campus counseling center (couple of half days around my teaching schedule) with my work in a private practice setting (one day a week) - went pretty smoothly overall. A lot of work, but it has been awesome. Along the way, I picked up my LCPC (significantly easier exam, my general no-study approach worked out perfect for that one!) which helped with bringing in some extra cash - highly recommend this step if you are creating your own site and looking for a way to make your postdoc more financially feasible...

    Fast forward to summer 2017 - wrapping up clinical hours and turned my attention again to the EPPP. This time, I wanted to pass and move on. But I still didn't want it to run my life. Acquired materials (77th Ed. AATBS, AATBS Exams, PsychPrep Exams) from a colleague who had just passed the EPPP. Set about developing a new strategy - the "just good enough" strategy. Here is what that looked like:
    • Reviewed books over a few months - reading through and doing section quizzes. Couple hours/week at first.
    • Prioritized heavy hitting categories. No thanks Test Construction and Stats/Research Design. Leaned on my stats class to carry me through - figured: why waste my time on something that will only have a handful of questions on the exam? Also figured that I would know a quarter outright and could make an educated guess on another 1/4. 50% on those sections? Good enough.
    • Listened to AATBS cds in car on way to postdoc, 1 month - listened through 1x.
    • Taught a bunch of psychology classes 2013-present (Intro, Counseling Theories, Group Process, etc.) - helped keep things current. Also allowed me to lightly review some sections of the materials - "saving" me time, although it was just displaced into course prep.
    • Signed up for EPPP for January 2018 to give myself a timeline to work with.
    • Spent this winter break (2018, ~ 4 weeks) more focused on EPPP: Daily review of major sections & practice tests - as many as I could find. I felt like this was one of the most helpful things I did. Academic Review (2013) 1-8, never scored higher than 65, most in high 50s low 60s. Then did PsychPrep (2010) A through E, highest 72, lows around mid60s. Felt a bit discouraged with AR scores (trying to get that "in the 70s feel", but felt better after PsychPrep). I think AR helped me grapple with weird questions/arcane material while PsychPrep helped me run through more realistic test material.
    • I invested 2 weeks during break really focused on the exam - post holidays, pre spring semester craziness. Three days before my exam, took the retired items test I found on this thread - 78%, big boost to my confidence. Two days before, did some light review. One day before, went snowshoeing. Slept like a baby the night before the exam - which my wife thought was really weird.
    • Took the EPPP again - passed (568).
    This worked for me - about two weeks of focus, within a month of steady review, preceded by 4-ish months of light prep/getting familiar. If you are taking those exams now and are scoring better than mid-60s (and higher than mid 70 on retired questions), I would encourage you to go for it. The EPPP is not worth your time - be "good enough" and move on. Live your life.

    During this whole process: I bought a house, had two children, launched a career as an academician (on the cusp of promotion to Associate!), and have now transitioned my postdoc into a successful part-time practice (still one day a week). It feels good being on the other side of the EPPP, and it also feels good having gone about it in a way that worked for me. So there you go.

    I wish you all the best in moving forward - may the road rise to meet you!

    ps~ I briefly thought about burning my EPPP materials in a fiery offering to the god of freedom, but then I realized, hey - people still need these! So get in touch if you are interested in some hand me downs - set of books, *most* of a cd collection (was missing two discs when I got it), flash cards, etc. I'm going to go all "pay it forward" on this and not even charge for them - seriously, get in touch.

    *Update: Materials have found a new home!
     
    #896 HipHopOPotomus, Jan 11, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
    Therapist4Chnge and madeincanada like this.
  49. Groupthink

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    28
    Happy to announce that I cleared the EPPP this weekend with a score well over 600.

    Like others, I found the following tips to be accurate:

    - The EPPP was far easier than any practice exam
    - Practice exams are the best way to study
    - The practice exams and the PEPPP vastly underestimate your actual score
    - When you are reliably scoring 70% or above on AATBS or Academic Review, it's time to schedule the exam
    - There are many questions on the EPPP about things you did not study

    Personal anecdotal opinions regarding test preparation:

    - Take a practice exam every day for 2 weeks. And I do mean every day. My scores shot up from a 61% on the first AATBS practice exam to a 75% on the last one, simply by taking exams and reviewing the rationale. Scored an 80% on the retired EPPP test questions.

    - Take the PEPPP at the testing center. I underestimated how much test anxiety I would have, and the PEPPP served as "flooding" for me which made the actual exam far easier. Additionally, taking the PEPPP at the same testing center as the EPPP will expedite the process because they will already have your palm print on file so there is less security to go through.

    - Answering some EPPP questions is more of a "process" than an "I know this for sure". When the response to a question is somewhat ambiguous, there will likely be one answer that "jumps out" at you. This is usually the right answer.

    - In concordance with the previous bullet point, do not change your first answer to questions unless you are absolutely 100% sure. Occasionally you'll progress through the test, read a question asking about the same concept, and realize you answered a previous question incorrectly. That's fine. Otherwise, when taking practice tests if I second-guessed my answer I was wrong and my original choice was correct 93.7% of the time (yes I calculated it).
     
  50. Mslolsalot

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2018
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychologist
    Hello all. I also got a lot of comfort from this thread, so I am paying it back.

    I wrote my exam in November and got a 485. :( Wrote again on Saturday and got a 529. While I didn't ace the exam like many others have, these are my experiences and I hope someone finds them helpful.

    I studied with AATBS. Spent way too much time reading and not enough "active" studying. The AATBS program annoyed me because it only had 8 full length exams. I tried to use the exams to build stamina for the big test.

    My AATBS test scores were in the high 50s before exam 1. I did the PEPPO and passed. After reading through these forums, I felt that I was ready enough (mistake). My first exam was extremely difficult. Having written twice, I can say with certainty that there was a marked difference in the difficulty level of the questions. Also, my scores were adequate to pass the PEPPO, but left little room for additional error. Be sure you're scoring high enough to pass even if you make a few stupid mistakes.

    My stupid mistakes on exam 1: 1) I flagged a ton of questions (80 or so) to review- but at that point fatigue had taken over and I know that I changed some answers simply because I felt I should change them, not because it was definitely right. 2) I was taken off guard by the lack of overlap between test questions and exam questions- they were very different and I didn't spend enough time thinking about what the questions was asking (which isn't always really clear). On my first test, the questions were not as simple as the ones on the PEPPO- at all. 3) I didn't prepare enough to offset human error. I know we all want our lives back, but don't rush to write the exam without being prepared.

    I received a printout from my exam and broke it down to assess the domains in which I was weakest. This was super helpful. I found that I/O was a component in all of my weak/low scoring categories.

    After failing, I took a break from studying (Christmas) and then I bought 1 month access to Academic Review. I enjoyed the AR materials better and you can create an unlimited number of tests, domain quizzes, and quiz flashcards. Some of the questions will repeat, but that was ok with me. I focused on the areas of weakness, but I skipped the test construction and stats all together. My marks were high enough in the major areas (high 80s in ethics and biological) to assume that if I got my weak areas (social/cultural & assessment) figured out via improving my I/O knowledge I would pass. And I did.

    Other issues that were as important (or more): I had to figure out my metacognitions during the exam. I found that I was rushing through questions, picking answers without reading all of the options, and was overthinking the answers. I have this funky tendency to talk myself into a wrong answer instead of picking the simplest answer. I resolved to slow down and I tracked questions by Answers I know for sure, 50/50, and No Idea! My results came out about 85 I was very sure of, 95 I was 50/50 on, and 45 that were no idea.

    As to the actual exam; the second version was much easier. One could say it was because I had studied longer & acquired more knowledge. However, some of the questions on the first exam I wrote were so convoluted and confusing and many were about things that I had no idea of. While there were a couple of those on the second version, most of the questions that I really didn't know about were from the stats & test construction areas that I didn't focus on in my second round of study.

    So, my takeaway to share is: take practice tests so you can analyze your habits of thinking, do the PEPPO and use the breakdowns to see where you need to strengthen knowledge, take breaks during the exam, don't flag a bunch of questions to review when your'e fatigued.
     
  51. chrostopherhenandex

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    36
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    Like, how do you know you should schedule the exam...

    Here are my scores on aatbs tests 1 - 5. I still have three more left (which i will use). I plan on taking them under normalish test conditions (the final three in test mode in my office with the door shut for four hours). Pearson doesn't have any good openings until the first or 2nd week of march.

    51% 72% 67% 62.00% 68.00%
     
  52. chrostopherhenandex

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    36
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    I passed PEPPPO this morning!

    I still have 3 AATBS exams left (I've ranged from 60-68% on the ones I've taken thus far).

    I am going to take the remainder in exams mode, and study up on the area's I've missed.

    I will probably register for the exam so I can't take it in a month or so. I think I might actually take PEPPP in person, too.
     

Share This Page