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EPPP practice test scores for those who passed

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by QClinician, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. RejectClinical

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    Just passed today. Score of 659. All I did was listen to the Psych Prep audio files (as well as reviewed the Ethics Code) and took maybe 15+ practice tests. When I listened to all the audio files, I took notes. After that, I maybe studied the notes for 4 weeks (3 of them intensively). Took practice tests throughout that time. I think a lot of people make some great points:

    1. You have to accept the fact that you won't be able to learn everything. There will be a good chunk not covered in your study materials. Just accept it.
    2. Taking practice tests is helpful in terms of figuring out "how" to take the test. The items can be tricky and often involve not just knowing the information, but how to apply it. This is definitely where I think the practice tests came in handy (especially for the ethics portion). Once I figured out how to take the test, I mostly used the practice tests to gauge how I was doing (IE was my score improving over time as I studied more info) vs. as a way to study (if that makes sense). My practice tests started out in the low 60s and I was in the 70s a week out from the exam. I felt the level of difficulty of the practice tests matched the level of difficulty of the real exam.
    3. A good chunk of your time should be spent studying (i.e., quizzing yourself) on the material. The prep cds cover the content more broadly than the practice tests do (at least the practice tests I used). Plus, a lot of the practice tests floating around are rather old (i.e., cerca pre-DSM-5). I really think this helped a lot and helped to narrow down the amount of information I needed to learn.
    4. You should know by now what works for you in terms of studying. Use those same skills to take the test.
    5. Schedule a date. You'll thank yourself. This really helped me stay motivated. I think once you have decided on the materials you're going to use to study, 4 weeks is more than enough time to study (provided you aren't working crazy hours). Again, it depends on the person, but most people probably don't need more than 6-8 weeks to prepare for this exam (although I do understand that depends upon where you're starting out and how quickly you learn info--if you're not sure, take a practice test).
    6. I and another post-doc scheduled the exam on the same day at the same time. I found this EXTREMELY helpful. We met outside of work to study (albeit we studied next to each other rather than with each other), checked in with each other, and asked each other questions. Having a study buddy in this process is super helpful and really made me stay motivated.
    7. If you're running out of time and you already have a date, just study the areas you're not as familiar with. I think I might have spent too much time on areas that I was familiar with and could have shortened my study time by focusing more on areas that I was less familiar with pre-studying.

    There are exceptions, but most people who put in a good amount of time studying pass the exam. It is do-able!
     
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  3. Life_of_Psyd

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    So- I have a question that is a little different but from this thread it looks like I might be able to get some good info... Is there a passing score that isn't... well.... passing "enough"? Reason I ask, I just took the EPPP after taking and passing the PEPPP and I scored a 538. I know this is over 500, so it says "pass" on my status. But is there a reason I should be worried that it isn't really high enough? Once you get "out into the real world" and out of school does anyone ever ask you what your score is or does anyone care? I'm applying for internship next year (yes- I took the EPPP early) and I'm wondering if people who score higher get more preference than those who just pass.
     
  4. singasongofjoy

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    Nope. No one asks, no one cares. ETA: IMO a pass less than like 650 means you studied just the right amount- good job maximizing your time by not over-studying. In retrospect as soon as I got my score I wished I had studied less and just taken it earlier. Kudos to you for maximizing efficiency. The fact that you have already taken it and got that out of the way though, that is definitely going to look good when you start looking at postdocs.
     
  5. foreverbull

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    The only score that matters is one that passes according to your state board for licensure. No one cares how much you aced it or barely met the minimum, nor are potential employers asking about your specific score.
    It feels good to be done with it, so enjoy the freedom of not having to worry about it or study for it, and congrats!
     
  6. singasongofjoy

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    Totally over-prepared. Happy for you that the end is in sight! It'll be a great study-free weekend afterwards, that's for sure.
     
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  7. DrBinWA

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    Hey friends!


    I wanted to post here to keep this thread current, and because I know I pored over it in the 1-2 weeks before the EPPP, and was much helped by other posts and threads here on Student Doctor. I just passed on 3/30, and there is hope!! I was NOT feeling confident going in (and I am typically a very confident test taker) and yet am here, on the other side, with a well passing score. I know this is a super long post, but I was really helped by people including their comprehensive info, and so wanted to do the same. TLDR important bits are underlined!


    My background: went to a weirdo PhD program specializing in existential and psychoanalytic psych so did not learn MOST of this stuff upfront. Did have a background teaching Intro Psych, and Social Psych, both of which helped. Took 2 years off between graduating and taking the test, so the material (if there at all) was by no means fresh.


    My prep: I collected a TON of materials from classmates and generous colleagues on internship, ultimately including: full set of audio files (PsychPrep), guided review volumes (AATBS), practice quizzes for each section (AATBS), about 6 full exams (some AATBS, some unidentified), slides from someone’s workshop attendance, and flashcards. Most was from 2011-2014, and I had limited access to DSM-V stuff (some audio and a guided review packet, but all the volumes, quizzes, exams, slides, flashcards, etc were DSM-IV). I used predominantly slide review, a little guided volume review, and a LOT of audio review and quizzes. I also took 3 practice exams. I did not really use the flashcards, or the guided volumes in total, as they seemed like overkill to me - SO much information, and you don’t really need to know it by recall (flashcards) but only by recognition (quizzes and exams).


    My timeline: I studied for about 10 weeks, averaging 12 hours per week. I work a compressed work week of three 12 hour days (MWTH) and a 4 hour day Friday, so every week I studied 6 hours Tuesdays, 2-4 hours Friday, and 2-4 hours on a weekend day. I did not accelerate towards the finish line, but did take the day off before the exam to do a final review and practice exam. I was glad I did - I would not have wanted to be seeing patients that day!


    My practice and final exam scores: I took 3 AATBS exams in the three weeks before the exam, and scored consecutively, 68, 60, and 64 (day before the exam). Final score on the exam was 644, well, well above what I anticipated. I relied more on quiz scores, and used the percentages available regarding how much of the test pulls from each domain to guide my progress. That is, I focused the most on scoring highly in ethics, interventions, and abnormal, since those are the highest content domain areas, and I made sure to be quizzing in the high 70s low 80s in those areas. I never quizzed above mid 60s for bio bases, and didn’t even try on RD, so I can’t say, but figured these two content areas would be offset by the more significant domains in which I was quizzing well. For I/O, Social, Assessment, Lifespan, and LT/CBT I got the point where I was passing with a 70 on quizzes, then moved on.


    My takeaway: It is FOR SURE true what people say that how you feel about the test is not representative of your score. I was pretty sure I hadn’t passed, and felt totally unsure about at least 50% of the material. I would honestly say I knew no more than 50 questions cold (and I felt like I had learned a lot of material!) and maybe another 50 or so where I was familiar enough with the options to at least feel like I was taking an educated guess ruling out options. For the rest, it truly was test taking strategies. I always have been a good test taker, so I didn’t take it that seriously when people emphasized the importance of learning the test specific strategies, but honestly, that’s where it’s at. I found the audio most helpful in that respect for walking through quiz questions and how the wording worked, and why answers were wrong or right. Even when sometimes the audio was the workshop leader going over questions that I couldn’t see, she would eventually read the answers and question (often in a way where I could participate on my own in the question, sometimes not) and the dissecting of the question and answers was KEY. I also knew basically none of stats/test construction/research design, and opted to just not learn it and spend my efforts studying elsewhere, which, for me, paid off. I felt I could reason my way through some of the stats/RD stuff, and the rest I just randomly guessed at and counted on points elsewhere. For me, that worked. I didn’t really find that having dated materials caused a big issue either. If you’re freaking out with low practice exam scores, I beseech you to calm yourself down! I truly thought my 60s were evidence that I was not really prepared, and, to be honest, I felt somewhat unprepared - I had learned so much, but there was still so much slipping through the cracks in terms of material. In the test situation itself, none of that mattered - the little details were asked about NOWHERE (even the concepts that showed up on Every. Single. Exam. I took!) and the test itself was SO different. I’m almost mad I spent as much time studying as I did!


    My tips: Because it was so different than I had trained on, I got very discouraged like 20-50 questions in, and had to really fight that. I took a break, did a brief meditative exercise that I’d been using all week, and got back in there. Once you’re in the test, there’s nothing to do but try. It sounds super corny, but I also wrote a quick note to myself on my white board to remember that negative experiences will always stand out more, and that I was doing great, and answering a lot right. Every time I knew I answered a question right, I would tap that little note, reminding myself of my competence, and replacing the anxiety and focusing on the ones I didn’t know with a sense of achievement and knowledge that I DID know some. Also, the timing thing is real - it never took me more than 2-2.5 hours to complete my practice exams, but I took a full 3 hours to complete the real exam, and spent the last 45 minutes reviewing flagged questions. I flagged everything I was remotely unsure about, but also made sure NOT to change my answer unless I really read something differently. On my final practice exam, I recorded the times I changed my answers and found that, 5 out of 7 times, I changed from a right answer to a wrong one. That was really useful to know, and I’d suggest tracking it in your practice exams. Lastly, TAKE BREAKS - I took 4 breaks total during the exam, to take a quick walk around the building, give myself a little forehead massage in the bathroom, or get some water. It really helps your mind to reset, and to come back with renewed strength.


    Good luck all!! You can do it! Use the strategies that you know work best for you, focus on the HOW of the test as much (or more) than the what, put in an appropriate amount of time, and you’ll get through it! Can’t wait to see you on the other side!
     
  8. Sobe103

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    First time test taker - Just passed the EPPP today with a score of 681!

    My takeaways:

    -I studied over a 3 month period. After 2 months, I wished I’d scheduled the test earlier! My studying had become slow/labored and I didn’t learn much more - I mostly kept practicing and rehearsing what I’d already studied to prevent decay.

    -My coworker let me borrow 2018 Academic Review books, and I had 2016 AATBS guides. I read them both, and the details presented in both were helpful for the exam.

    -I took 14 practice tests - 5 PsychPrep, 6 AATBS, the 250 Retired EPPP questions, and the 2 Practice EPPP Online (PEPPPO) exams. AATBS and PsychPrep tests were VERY useful, because I saw similar questions on the exam. (Similar ethical scenarios, etc.)

    -A week before the exam, I scored 80% on PsychPrep Exam A, 73% on PsychPrep Exam C, 79% on the 250 Retired EPPP questions, and >70% on several AATBS exams. I had Pass scores on the PEPPPO and PEPPPO2.

    -IMO, the apps were wastes of money. I barely used them. ASPPB EPPP 2018 was the worst - I didn’t think it was a good representation of the EPPP material.

    -I relaxed in the days before the exam! I had a very nice weekend. I wanted to feel calm leading up to the exam.

    -I scheduled my exam for 12:30, so I’d gotten plenty of sleep and had eaten a good lunch. Check in for the exam took just 5 minutes. I stashed a water bottle in the locker. I only took 2 breaks - I was cautioned that the test center would have to “report” if I took over 3 breaks. I had to pat myself down, roll up my sleeves, etc. each time I entered the testing area.

    -A coworker suggested I write “Congratulations - You have passed!” on the white board. I did this, and it was empowering!

    -If I didn’t know an answer, I’d eliminate a few choices, then pick the “most likely.” There were about 5 questions where I was totally in the dark & couldn’t eliminate any choices - I just picked one. Then, I moved on & didn’t give it second thought.

    -I flagged 10 questions to review at the end. I flagged only those that I thought I could figure out with extra time. If I didn’t think that more time could help, I just let it be.

    The whole exam took 2 hours, 20 minutes - again, because I’d answer & “move on” rather than stay stuck!

    It’s very nice to be done! Good luck everybody!
     
    #907 Sobe103, May 1, 2018
    Last edited: May 1, 2018
  9. postdocangst

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    I found this thread incredibly helpful as I was studying for the EPPP. I'm happy to report I passed with a 650. Which maaaaaaay have been a touch higher if I didn't go back and change answers at the end (I don't know why I did that, I told myself not to do that!)

    I primarily used AATBS 2018 materials and hand-me-down Psychprep practice tests. I studied for 6 weeks total. My last 4 AATBS exam scores were 68%, 68%, 68%, 71%. I was passing Psychprep practice tests in mid-high 70s prior to the exam. I also took the PEPPO and passed. As others have said, I found the PEPPO content and questions most similar to the actual exam. Coming from AATBS, I was also prepared to see questions on theories/people I had never heard of, so managed to get through those with minimal anxiety!!

    I used all the modalities available through AATBS - audio, online workshop, books, section quizzes, and practice exams. I'm happy with their study materials and feel I was well prepared for the exam. Even after reading this thread (multiple times), I was concerned about not scoring over 70 on all but one AATBS exam. Definitely did not need to worry!

    Good luck everybody! I'm also selling my AATBS materials, PM me if interested :)
     
    #908 postdocangst, May 10, 2018
    Last edited: May 10, 2018
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  10. Shadow1

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    When describing your preparation you mentioned 250 retired EPPP questions. Where can I obtain these retired questions, or was that apart of one of the programs you were using?
     
  11. proudvegan

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    I can't even begin to tell you how many times I have taken and did not pass.

    I am happy for those who passed and it gives me hope. For awhile I was trying to figure out what I was doing wrong. For me, it is about figuring out a study strategy. Its been 5 years since grad school so I am not even in study/school mode. This exam is way different than any tests I've ever taken.

    Right now, I really don't have much time before the test date. So I am using the self-paced online webinar to review everything. Then I will do the quizzes and hopefully take one last practice exam test. My practice exam usually ends up in the 50s% which I am not happy about... I am doing better with reading the questions carefully and focusing on what the question is really asking and not even looking at the time. Looking at the time gives me a lot of anxiety.

    I am staying positive this time and focus on passing! At the same time, it gets overwhelming that I just want to give up. :(
     
  12. StellaB

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    EPPP Retired Questions - it's actually free, you don't need to pay for the download.
     
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  13. StellaB

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    I strongly recommend reading about and focusing on your question answering strategy. Get your hands on as many full-length tests you can, and practice with those. If your scores are consistently in the 50's, that's a good sign you need to do something else to be fully prepared. ModernPsychologist.com is a weird site with a lot of conspiracy-type stuff on it, but it does offer a 250-question retired questions test, which is super helpful. It also has an outline of the test content that is helpful. Good luck to you.
     
  14. proudvegan

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    Thank you so much for your input. I put together all the practice tests from PsychPrep and AATBS that I will work on again. After trying to look at my resources and past experience and knowing that I do better auditory/classroom setting, I decided to try listening to the self-paced workshop and found it to be much helpful! The explanations on reading and answering the questions helped me see it in a different perspective as well as the examples provided. I was able to recall what I was reading/hearing better. So I think this is a good review for me. I know that I know the materials, but sometimes I get the concepts/theories/definitions mixed up because they are all similar or integrate together. That is when I need to work on remembering the definition or which concepts goes with which theories. I feel like I got this now! Fingers crossed. Thank you again.
     
  15. Shadow1

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    Thank you.
     
  16. psystudent88

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    Wooo passed the EPPP!! I found this thread incredibly helpful for managing my expectations about practice tests. To pay it forward, I will say that I almost exclusively relied on a one month subscription to Psychprep. In Psychprep, I took practice tests A-E multiple times (generally 50-70% correct on the first go round, 75-85% on the second go round, and over 95% the last time in "test mode"). I also reviewed notes of content areas that I was unfamiliar with, watched a few youtube videos, listened to random hand-me-down recordings, and recopied hand-me-down notes. That said, I have a pretty probably only studied 3-4 or so hours per week for about 3 months (then crammed for 9 or so hours the day before the test). My score was 638. Questions on Psychprep were very similar to the actual exam -- would recommend!
     
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  17. little_albert

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    In terms of test taking strategy, can anyone recommend if it is useful or not to go through the test and answer all the questions that you for sure know the answer to at first, and then come back around for the more difficult Q's after? Trying to figure out the best way to pace such a long test....thanks!
     
  18. AcronymAllergy

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    This is essentially what I did. I went through and answered every question initially, but was liberal with marking those about which I was unsure. I made sure not to think too long on any one particular question the first time through.

    I don't know that I'd recommend actually skipping very many (if any) questions, though. I'd rather have had some answer than nothing.
     
  19. foreverbull

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    Yes, definitely. I flagged the ones that were really hard and returned to them at the end, but I tried to keep the flagging to a minimum in general (you could end up flagging like 75+ questions if you get the hard form of the test, which is a lot to have to go back to). I might've flagged like 30?
     
  20. WisNeuro

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    There is no "hard" form of the test. There are essentially equal versions, and some extra questions that do not count that they are evaluating for future versions.
     
  21. foreverbull

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    Yes, there are different forms varying in difficulty.

    "As the forms of the EPPP may vary in terms of difficulty, the exact raw score needed to attain a scaled score of 500 varies (e.g., on a harder form of the EPPP a raw score of 65% correct may be a 500."

    About the EPPP | Comprehensive Psychology Licensing Preparation Programs
     
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  22. WisNeuro

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    In terms of the minor differences in some item content, technically yes, one version may be slightly "harder" from a raw score perspective. However, it is scaled to that cohort, controlling for differences in difficulty, rendering them generally equivalent in difficulty. So, no one is getting screwed depending on what version they get.
     
  23. foreverbull

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    I didn't imply that anyone gets "screwed" with a harder form. Harder forms are scaled easier. All I said was that harder forms exist. There are absolutely different forms and "harder" and "easier" versions floating around, although they're all scaled differently so as to even out. Many folks aren't aware of this.
     
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  24. WisNeuro

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    But, in the end, because they are scaled, they are equivalent. So, there really is no harder or easier in practice. Additionally, we'd have to see the numbers. but I'd imagine that the differences in item difficulty are exceedingly minor at this point. Cohort effects likely influence the difficulty stats as much, if not more, than actual item content differences.
     
  25. foreverbull

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    Sources?

    We know from my link by psychprep that harder to take = lower score to pass is equivalent to easier to take = higher score needed to pass.
    There are real difficulty differences that then even out between the tests due to more lenient scaling on the harder versions, per the link I shared earlier via psychprep. I'm not sure what you're trying to disagree with here.
     
  26. WisNeuro

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    Just that there are any practical differences in difficulty with the EPPP. There is a lot of misinformation about the "unfairness" of the test. Just trying to help in dispelling those rumors. When it's all said and done, the difficulty is scaled approximately the same.
     
  27. 123EW

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    From ASPPB:
    Myth #1:
    There are easy and hard versions of the exam. It is unfair if you get the hard version.

    Reality:
    Forms of the EPPP do vary in difficulty. The passing score of each version is equated so that the level of knowledge being tested is consistent. Practically speaking, this means that the "harder” forms require fewer correct answers to pass and "easy” forms require more. It is not unfair if you get a harder version because you don’t need to get as many answers right.
    ______

    I would argue that it is unfair to those prone to test anxiety. Having a more difficult version could lead to heightened anxiety (beyond the Yerkes-Dodson law of arousal), which is known to impair cognitive functioning
     
  28. AbnormalPsych

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    But it would NOT be MORE difficult.
     
  29. Onefootforward

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    Hello,

    I’m a mom with five kids, eight and under. My youngest is six months old. As a new mom many years back, I took the EPPP after minimally studying and received a 492. Shortly thereafter we moved overseas. Fast forward almost nine years, and I’ve been studying for it for about six months. Although I am studying way harder now than I did last time, I’ve been out of graduate school for a long time and with little ones to tend to, it hasn’t been easy refreshing my memory, or relearning new material. Still, I’m determined. I only have the AATBS study materials. My strategy at this point is reviewing all the incorrect questions on the practice exams. My highest practice exam score has been a 71. I failed the PEPPO this morning. I thought the questions were odd and my baby woke up half way through and I was preoccupied with her. The stakes are really high for me because taking the exam means flying overseas with a baby while my husband stays behind with the rest of our kids. At this point, I, so ready to put this behind me. It’s sucking up way too much of my time at the expense of other, more important, things. But I feel confused as to my readiness. On the one hand, if I failed the PEPPO, that’s not very positive. On the other hand, if I’m achieving 70’s on the practice exams, I thought that was a good indicator of readiness. Any thoughts would be appreciated. It would be a total nightmare if I traveled all that distance and failed.
     
  30. WisNeuro

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    You are assuming that a test taker would be able to somehow have awareness of generally minute differences in test difficulty when looking at test theory stats in relation to another form of the test, of which they have not seen. This is an absurd assumption.
     
  31. super.ego

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    It does not matter if the test taker is able to determine which test he/she was administered. The fact of the matter is that the more difficult test would likely generate more anxiety within the test taker due to the test taker's recognition that he/she is less prepared than he/she thought. Consequently, the test taker with the more difficult test might be more inhibited by his/her anxiety than he/she would have been had he/she been administered the "easier" test. I think this is 123EW's point. My bad if I'm missing something here...
     
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  32. WisNeuro

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    This seems to be an issue that is not related to slight differences in item difficulty. To the other point, you would conceivably need to have significant differences in test difficulty to appreciably move the needle. Considering many programs achieve a pass rate at or near 100% for extended periods of time, a "luck of the draw difficulty argument" does not seem to hold much water. It's just not there. I call BS on this assertion.
     
  33. foreverbull

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    I can speak to different experiences with the EPPP between two evenly matched peole with equivalent intelligence (knew each other very well for years), equal achievement and got the same test grades, went to the same grad program, studied about the same amount with the exact same study materials and took the test within a year of each other. They also talked about the testing/studying experiences with each other. Person #1 had zero history of test anxiety and wasn't that nervous about the test to begin with, but upon reading the first 10+ questions and not recognizing the material, blanked out for a bit. This person passed, but guessed on most of the questions because they were unfamiliar concepts/studies referred to and was initially thrown off so much so as to need to do some deep breathing. Person #2 had more test anxiety (but not to the extreme) and took the test and recognized most of the concepts and found the test challenging, but not overly-difficult. This person also passed.

    Point being, there are real differences in test difficulty with all other things being equal (and yes, they're equivalent forms due to scoring differences as we discussed, so they're not technically "unfair"). Person #1 had a higher confidence level going in than person #2 and yet got thrown off by the difficulty, whereas Person #2 felt like the test had been generally straightforward except for some more difficult questions here and there. As I said, these people were equally matched in as many ways as you can match them, pretty much.

    So I would suggest that it is potentially possible that more difficult forms could cause folks with extreme test anxiety to fear that they understudied, which is why I think it's important for folks in this forum to be aware that more difficult forms are in existence and not to get thrown off by them. Remember that these are scored more generously/leniently than the easier forms and to use that knowledge to stay calm during the exam. You can miss more on the harder forms and still pass.
     
  34. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Did you have matched IQ tests to confirm this? Perhaps matched GRE scores for verification? Also, do we know the forms they both took? This anecdote doesn't really illustrate anything here of import.
     
  35. foreverbull

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    Regardless of whether or not I answer these questions, we know that forms vary in difficulty as fact. My ultimate point is to educate folks so they don't get thrown off if their form is more difficult. Your point is equally based on conjecture, anecdotes, and/or assumptions if you say that the differences in difficulty are "slight" if you don't have any test data to back it up. Unless you know the differences in scaling of each form, that isn't actually known. But what we can do is acknowledge the differences and help prepare folks for that possibility rather than tell them they're all equivalent and leave it at that, which may be less helpful. I'm not trying to scare folks, just prepare them for the different forms.
     
  36. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    An assertion was made initially with no demonstrable evidence. I merely pointed out the absurdness of the assertion and the absurd anecdotes that followed. The burden of evidence is on the party making the claim. It's kind of how science works.
     
  37. foreverbull

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    Do not patronize me. I offered factual evidence of difficulty differences in forms via psychprep (after you mistakenly asserted that there were not more difficult or easy forms) + an anecdote. You offered nothing but assumptions of "slight" differences of the test items only, and yet you somehow have no responsibility to show any evidence of this "knowledge" yourself after I asked for it twice? That doesn't make any sense to me.

    Regardless, you seem to be missing the greater point that educating folks on the fact that there are different forms might be helpful. Let's not get lost in pointless debate and ignore the original purpose of my post, which is to support future EPPP test-takers.
     
  38. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Easy there, tough guy. And the evidence of demonstrable differences in difficulty was not really provided. Just that there are some slight differences in tests that are scaled out at the end. The onus is still on the assertion. If you really want to make the point, get the item test characteristics and we can look at some IRT models between the tests.

    Talk about missing points, raising alarmist drivel and all.
     
  39. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Oh, I would counter that we are indeed varying in our levels of civility. ;)
     
  40. Gantapsych

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    Today I passed the EPPP(527). I primarily used Psychprep. I used both the online testing and the reading materials. Additionally, I worked with a Psychprep coach. My scores on the Test Mode omfor Psychprep Tests A,B,C,D and E ranged from 89 to 93. I scored 530 on the PEPPP2. I would recommend PSYCHPREP. The online tests were very helpful.
     
  41. GoPokes

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    Hi all. After being on this board for all these years, it's finally my turn to post in this thread (though mine isn't a success story -- yet!)

    I've been studying with the ATTBS written materials/some audio files that I received from someone else.

    I took the ATTBS baseline exam and got a 45% (yikes).

    Two weeks ago I took two different practice exams (both look to be quite old, e.g., questions on older versions of the DSM, WAIS-III, etc.) and got a 54% and a 55% respectively.

    I'm preparing to take the exam in late August, so I have some time, and I'm sort of confident about the areas that I really need to study hard (i.e., areas I notice I do poorly in on those two practice exams) to bring up my score.

    My question is, have any of you purchased/used the online practice exams from pyschprep/AATBS? They're quite expensive at all, but I keep getting this feeling that taking more recent practice exams would be helpful. I guess I'm ambivalent about spending this sort of money, but I wanted to get people's thoughts on these resources. Just to reiterate, I'm referring to the AATBS/psychprep products where you purchase access to their online exams for 1 month or more. I appreciate any insight!
     
  42. Member6677

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    Is there any correlation between practice test number and difficulty? I've been using Academic Review (2013) and slowly increasing my scores each test; I got a 68% on test 6 last week and felt confident I would improve today. However, I found test 7 to be the hardest test I have ever taken and completely unlike the previous! I scored 68% again (somehow) but remain curious if I am alone in thinking it was more difficult. I'm hoping to take the exam in approx. 3 weeks...

    Thanks!
     
  43. Moonlight1

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    I don't know if the tests increase with difficulty but I too have found my score plateaued. I used PsychPrep materials from around 2009 to study for several weeks and then paid for 30 days access to Academic Review online to get experience with computer based testing and updated questions. My score has been 71.55% for my past 3 AR tests and I got 140 (70%) on PsychPrep Test E yesterday. I was freaked out at first. But now having looked at others comments I think plateauing around 70% is a common experience, unless you have time to really over-prepare. I am taking the test next week and am focusing on continuing to review material, especially areas that make up a large portion of the test or that I performed low in on practice exams. I plan to take one last practice test on Monday. I think there is a high probability that if you continue to do the things that prepare you for the test, you will do great.
     
  44. proudvegan

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    I, too, have been using all old PsychPrep, AATBS, and Academic Review exams that were handed down to me. Most of them are dated 2015. The point of working on the questions is not so much the content materials (although it is very important), but to learn how to take the test. That was one of my biggest problem with not being able to read the questions carefully and answering them wrong. I last took the AATBS test about a year ago or longer and I was consistently scoring between 44-53%. Then a friend of mine, became my coach and helped me with how to read the questions better. I have been taking the test in order and according to Dr. Jablon and AATBS people, they said their tests' difficulty increases in each exam so it is important to start with 1 or A and move up in order. I noticed AATBS exam 1 was easy and straightforward and as I am now on Exam 4, the questions are convulated.

    My practice test scores are now at 58-59%. I noticed that I'll put a question mark on one of the answers and it is usually the correct one, so I am working on making sure that I don't doubt myself or second guess. I think I have gotten better with reading the questions carefully but still have a lot more work to do.

    I take two practice tests a week in timed mode to strengthen my stamina and endurance. in between test days, I work on reviewing the rationale for the incorrect and correct answers. Rationale also helps with studying information I don't know. In addition, I also answer 25-50 questions a day. And spend about 25% each day reviewing summary of the content domain.

    Is there any recent retired questions? the one floating around is so old but was wondering if it is still good enough.
     
  45. proudvegan

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    I would recommend you take the practice test in timed mode with no distraction and in a similar testing center mode. I take my exam at the local college library since it has a set up similar to the testing center. Read the AATBS material, take the test each week, and then work on improving your test taking strategy.
     
  46. Moonlight1

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    I wanted to share my experience in case it would help anyone else. I passed the EPPP today with a score of 622.

    I started studying 6 months ago but seriously 10 weeks ago. I primarily studied with PsychPrep materials from 2009. I listened to the audio while following along with the books thru section 8. I started taking the PsychPrep tests right away, 25 questions at a time and then studying the rationals. I had taken PsychPrep tests A-D as well as taken A and B a second time by the time I was 4 weeks out from the test. The last month I bought a 30 day subscription to AR (tip: discounts on holidays). I wanted more current materials to review DSM 5 changes and newer questions using the computer-based testing. In the last month I took 7 more practice tests in exam mode as well as PsychPrep Test E on paper. I would take a practice test and then spend 2-4 days reviewing the rationals and identifying weaknesses based on my performance where I would study the book material more intensely. My scores on AR 2 weeks out were 71.55% (on 2 exams). My AR score 1 week out was 71.11%. I got 140/200 on PsychPrep E 5 days out. Finally, I got a 78.22% on AR 2 days out. I took the final practice test at a slower pace which worked better for me, personally. I studied a few hours the day before but focused on relaxation, exercise, and sleep. My exam wasn't scheduled till 2:45pm, so I made sure to get on a schedule of sleeping-in during the days leading up to the exam in order to be fresh at the time of the test. The day of I focused on eating a healthy meal with sufficient protein and drank Poweraide Zero. I also stretched because I had been getting sore sitting so much while studying. I took the test at a slower pace. I actually only had 6 minutes left to review. A lot of people take it more quickly, and then go back in review. That just didn't work as well from me. I want to encourage people to find what works for them and not worry if that happens to be taking it slow. Good luck!
     
  47. Polly Wolly

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    Just passed the EPPP... though it was close, 519

    Studied 4 months, 10hr a week, and the last 3 weeks i bumped it up to 20hrs a week.
    I work full-time and have 2 small children. Being away from my family to studying has been difficult on all of us.

    I used aatbs and psych prep materials to study, and I also took their practice exams. My scores averaged at 65% (60%-68%).
    I felt like i was learning, but it was not evident in my practice scores. On the Retired EPPP, i scored 77%

    To me, the EPPP felt similar to the prep companies practice exams. Content in general was recognizable. There is no way I could have answered some of the questions without studying. I learned a lot and freshened up on previously learned concepts. I feel many questions on the EPPP were more detailed than my study materials covered, and the answer choices often had two that I was torn between. Because of this, I knew that I was close and it could go either way. My version of the test had straight forward wording, and was easier than the prep companies in that regard. In general, i did not feel it was tricky, but it wasn't easy either. It was exhausting. I did not have time for a break. At my seat, I did stretch, close my eyes, and take some deep breaths. I also wrote a positive message to myself on the white board. I used the highlighting and strike-through tools. I only flagged items (30ish) that I thought more time may help me resolve, but I did not have time to go through them.

    Thank you previous posters for sharing your experiences. It helped me feel not so alone in this process. Best of luck to all who are studying. You will make it through.
     
  48. proudvegan

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    Congratulations to the ones who have passed recently.

    Anyone or know of anyone who purchased the exam book from Modern Psychologist? I came across the site for the retired questions and noticed this. Wondered if anyone has any thoughts or opinion?
     
  49. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    I try to avoid financing conspiracy theorists.
     
  50. foreverbull

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    I haven't seen it, but it's free now, I thought, and if it had been free when I was studying, I would've checked it out. The more accessible study resources, the better, regardless of the source.
     
  51. proudvegan

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    I didn’t think the outline was helpful to me and yes, it is free. I didn’t understand much of it. I did purchased the 3 exams (225 questions each) for $50 from modern psychologist website. I have been scoring 66-67% on those. It might be higher because there was an error on one of question’s answer. It’s supposed to be similar to 2018 questions seen on EPPP.

    I’m planning to purchase the assessment test from AATBS. It’s a one test that I can used to determined how I’ll do on the exam. I’m taking the exam soon.

    I might be overworrying and driving myself crazy, but I need reassurance. From any of you. :)

    According to psychprep website, I should be getting 123+ correct which is equivalent to 70%. So I'm assuming the 123 is the raw score. So if I’m getting above that correct which for me has been 130-149ish correct, I’m still good, right!?!?

    I’ve been using Aatbs materials now and threw out psych prep after two years of not passing. I went to the 4 day workshop two weeks ago and they were phenomenal!!!!!! It was exactly what I needed and I think it helped improved my practice test scores.

    I think what I’m worried about is that I’m doing well and the day of the test... I get them all wrong or forget or blank out. :(

    Thanks everyone! I’m sorry for being over anxious. But I hope y’all understand.
     

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