First year of undergrade too early to start studying for the MCAT?

StudentDoctora

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I mean, I realize that I won't know much of the material just yet, but starting to study now should help me to retain/focus on which info I need to really remember for the MCAT, right? I don't mean studying hard and trying to take practice tests, just continually reviewing the information every few weeks to stay fresh? Wouldn't that be more effective than trying to back-track and re-learn things in a few years? Thanks for any opinions! :D
 

savant

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I bought a MCAT book in my freshman year but didn't open it until 3 weeks before the actual test :(

You'll either get sidetracked, get too busy, or forget stuff IMO.
 

MDman87

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To answer your question, I don't think it's too early at all. Like you say, you won't be familiar with a lot of the material, but I think the earlier you start, the better. I can't imagine how much better off I'd be if I had started 2 years ago. . . I definitely wouldn't be this nervous about it now
 
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jsanchez

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i think its a good idea to start with the verbal, read more articles and try to come up with the main idea and why the author is writing it, or what he is trying to convey. practice passages from now on, whenever you have time but dont overdo it.

as far as the physical and biological sciences, some of the stuff you will pick up as you take the undergrad courses, but as you learn them you might want to try practice passages on the topics so you can master them. i always feel the more you see something the better you familiarize yourself with it, kinda like when a baby familiarizes with his or her mother as he grows up.

remember that you cant neglect your courses because your gpa is important when it comes to applying.

best of luck when the time comes for the app process.
 

RevivedPreMed

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I'm in an MCAT prep course right now and honestly, I wish I had taken it before my prereqs! I actually feel like my classes would have been easier if I had touched on all the basics beforehand.

Studying now might help you for your premed coursework.
 

GonnaBeADoc2222

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way to early to even start thinking about the mcat...use the time to either pursue a hobby or have fun with your friends :)
 

Abulcasis

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I actually had the same exact question too....

As premature as this sounds...it's like the SAT...the earlier you start, the better.
 

mtnman12

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way to early to even start thinking about the mcat...use the time to either pursue a hobby or have fun with your friends :)
seriously...live the college life. volunteer, travel, do a bunch of things besides study for the mcat. or even study for your normal classes unless you're rockin a 4.0.
 

yellowtibby

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Although you may think you can effectively study for the MCAT in your first year, you will soon find that doing well in your pre-med courses will take away so much time that it will be hard for you to really study for the thing until summer and winter breaks.
 

circulus vitios

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Are you serious? I started studying for the MCAT during my junior year of high school.
 

mtnman12

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and also don't start reading this forum yet!! it will consume you...
 

jopo

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The best way to study for the MCAT is to do well in your classes. Then when it comes time for you to study for the MCAT is will only be a review for you instead of an O-my-god-I-wish-I-would-have-learned-this-back-when-I-took-these-classes freak out cram session.
 
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Abulcasis

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Are you serious? I started studying for the MCAT during my junior year of high school.
I was taking physics in my junior year!

But diligent gentleman, what was your score, if I may ask?
 

amikhchi

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i wouldn't start studying for the *MCAT* in freshman year, but I would definitely do a lot of practice verbal passages... that seems like the thing that is much harder to learn in a short amount of time
 

WolverineDoc13

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The best way to study for the MCAT is to do well in your classes. Then when it comes time for you to study for the MCAT is will only be a review for you instead of an O-my-god-I-wish-I-would-have-learned-this-back-when-I-took-these-classes freak out cram session.
ditto. ditto. ditto.

Everything that you'll need to know for the MCAT will be in the pre-med classes you will take. To further prepare, you may want to go beyond general bio and take some form of physiology and biochemistry. Whatever your college offers. Also, taking p-chem (physical chemistry) right before my MCAT literally rose my physical science score by 3-4 points.

Also, take some heavy-reading classes for the verbal section. This would include English lit, Poli Sci, History, Philosophy, Women's Studies, etc. You may also want to read as much as you can outside of your classes. (Newsweek, New York Times, New Yorker, literature, Time, Wall Street Journal, etc.)

That's studying for the MCAT, my dear. No Kaplan books needed right now.
 

Insulinshock

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I mean, I realize that I won't know much of the material just yet, but starting to study now should help me to retain/focus on which info I need to really remember for the MCAT, right? I don't mean studying hard and trying to take practice tests, just continually reviewing the information every few weeks to stay fresh? Wouldn't that be more effective than trying to back-track and re-learn things in a few years? Thanks for any opinions! :D
the best way to study for material now is to master the information while your learning it in class.. most of the stuff on the mcat youve never even heard of yet, so just make sure you realllllly master the material by working hard in classes so that come review time you've got a strong foundation.
 

circulus vitios

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I was taking physics in my junior year!

But diligent gentleman, what was your score, if I may ask?
I was kidding. The neuroticism of some people, particularly the thread starter, is astounding. Studying MCAT material in your first year of college? You won't even understand the material, much less remember it when you finally take it...IN THREE YEARS.
 

chewsnuffles

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A little bit of light studying for the MCATS could probably help you do better in your pre-req's, so its a win-win. I bet the Kaplan book teaches a few subjects better than your prof's. Just don't let it become your life, it is too early for that :laugh:
 

ncguy2005

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I looked forward to the MCAT, until it was actually time to start studying for it... then my life sucked for three months..haha
 
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ditto. ditto. ditto.

Everything that you'll need to know for the MCAT will be in the pre-med classes you will take. To further prepare, you may want to go beyond general bio and take some form of physiology and biochemistry. Whatever your college offers. Also, taking p-chem (physical chemistry) right before my MCAT literally rose my physical science score by 3-4 points.

Also, take some heavy-reading classes for the verbal section. This would include English lit, Poli Sci, History, Philosophy, Women's Studies, etc. You may also want to read as much as you can outside of your classes. (Newsweek, New York Times, New Yorker, literature, Time, Wall Street Journal, etc.)

That's studying for the MCAT, my dear. No Kaplan books needed right now.
QFT!

I hadn't clicked on this thread because i thought the answer was obvious but then i looked at it an realized that some people are really irrational. DO NOT study for the MCAT freshman year....to study for the BS and PS sections just take the classes and do well in them....for verbal: READ! (i wish i had known this). And when I say read i do not mean verbal passages or anything medically related! read the economist, the wall street journal, the new york times, books, etc. In addition, you should get started on your volunteering, clinical experience, research...just generally take advantage of what your college has to offer early on! and most importantly have fun! you're only a college freshman once....don't waste your time staring at MCAT books....that's just silly.

oh and AMEN to getting the hell away from SDN! Come back when you start your AMCAS application....before then this site is not only useless but detrimental.
 

229141

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Dude you are studying for MCAT everytime you study for your biology, chemistry, physics classes etc. I've never used formal prep and am just starting to...but I'm hitting 34-35 on all practice tests just simply because I studied hard all these years..just work hard man and you'll do great
 

Oxygen206

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To the OP...

Don't waste your time...you'll only take away from the time you should be studying for the classes you're taking now (which could hurt your GPA).

As everyone else has said, do well in your pre-med classes...hell, start them as early as possible (I know I wish I did...now I'm looking at super-seniordom). However, doing well doesn't equate to cramming before a test, spitting out all the answers, and forgetting everything afterwards. Strive to have a deep conceptual understanding in your pre-med classes, don't just try to memorize a bunch of facts (which if you start "studying" now, you'll probably just remember random facts for like three days without any real underlying understanding).

To those of you who said to start reading everything (articles etc) that's a great idea...one that I'm going to start doing, although it might be a little too late for me :rolleyes:
 

NTF

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Don't worry about the PS or BS sections for now. Your classes will help you with that.

But you can start preparing for the VR section by:

1) Listening to NPR everyday
2) Reading newspapers online (NY times, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, LA times, Houston Chronicle, Washington Post, etc.)
3) Reading magazines (New Yorker, Economist, Harper's, National Review, The Nation, etc.)
4) Perusing journals of interest (NEJM, Science, Nature, etc.)
5) Reading non-fiction books that interest you.

Having facility with essay writing and expository writing isn't something that's easy to cram or study, but more of a habit. Plus, all this reading will make you a much better interviewee.
 

Abulcasis

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I was kidding. The neuroticism of some people, particularly the thread starter, is astounding. Studying MCAT material in your first year of college? You won't even understand the material, much less remember it when you finally take it...IN THREE YEARS.
Not cool.
 

Forthegood

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^ First rule of the pre-med track. Do what you think will be best for you.

If you want to study, study. Don't worry what other people's opinion of you is. Kick @ss on that test and laugh your way to med school.

I had the same idea when I got to undergrad. Eventually, you will get caught up in your studies and you'll be too busy to study the MCAT. If you aren't to busy during the semester, consider harder classes.
 
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