Florida doctor tells Obama supporters: Go elsewhere

armybound

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that's exactly what i was thinking:laugh:
that's if you're operating under the assumption that the doc would be losing business from this sign. he could have so many patients that turning away 50% of all potential customers doesn't decrease his workload at all.

you can only see so many patients at a time.
 

richse

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I don't know, I might argue that a private practice urologist wouldn't normally see emergent cases. For all we know he could run a boutique where all he does is vasectomies, or he gets 100% of his cases by referral and would expect all emergent cases to be screened before being sent to him.

There are too many variables to say that this doctor is directly causing harm. I'll agree that a patient may see a negative effect from the few hours' wait this may cause, but I think the likelihood of anyone seeing negative outcomes from this are miniscule and are as arbitrary as choosing which day to go to the doctor or which day to have an appointment.
I agree that this particular doc may not normally see cases that are emergent, but I did see a presentation recently by a urologist and he discussed a few cases where tumors were missed and could have been treated if he had seen the patient earlier.

I guess my larger worry would be more doctors, especially in the same area, putting up signs like this. It would almost be back to segregation, but along political lines.

Also, I don't know if I agree that this would only be a small delay (hours to days). It can take a long time to get an appointment with some specialists. Recently, I had to wait more than a month for an appointment with a specialist and I live in a city.
 

Instatewaiter

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Well considering that 95% of African Americans voted for him, I'm sure they are in that "Obama supporters" camp. The doctor may not be targeting AA directly with his sign but that may be one of the result.
He's singling out democrats, not blacks. Homosexuals also tend to almost unanimously vote for democrats. He's not singling them out either.

He's also not singling out trial lawyers. They also almost unanimously vote for democrats and much (?most) of the democratic funds come from trial lawyers.

He's not singling out abortion proponents, or hispanics or any other group that traditionally votes democrat.

I think people really misunderstand the Hippocratic oath.
From reading this thread, they clearly do.
 
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that's if you're operating under the assumption that the doc would be losing business from this sign. he could have so many patients that turning away 50% of all potential customers doesn't decrease his workload at all.

you can only see so many patients at a time.

just saying that sign is deterring potential patients who are obama supporters, meaning less $$ for him.
 

armybound

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just saying that sign is deterring potential patients who are obama supporters, meaning less $$ for him.
I understand what you're saying, I'm just making the argument that he may not be losing any money at all.

You might also feel that any doctor who turns down Medicare patients may be losing money, but it's just as easy to argue that they would make MORE money by filling the same appointments with people whose insurance compensates better than Medicare does.
 

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I just think it lacks class. It is fine to believe in other things and to try to change them. Potentially making your patients feel uncomfortable because they have a different viewpoint is wrong. When that patient is in your office, it isn't or shouldn't be about anything except their health. You can't just say "Oh, well I won't turn them down for treatment!". If you put any sign up within that area, it is going to make the patient lose trust in you and it may even make them lose trust in other physicians as a whole. He is allowed to be angry, but it amazes me that he takes it out like that. Be angry at the senate, be angry at your party for simply trying to kill it rather than adding amendments when they can, be angry at the democrats for ramming it through. Evidently he hasn't paid attention to reimbursement before this time since it has already been going down for well over 20 years. Hell, the clinton administration actually froze/slowed the decline for a little bit.

I think it says a lot about his character and really goes beyond just losing money or patients. It is selfish and uncalled for. Save it for your own time when a person isn't putting their trust in you to make them better.
 

45408

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This doctor was not looking out for quality medical care, he was withholding an essential public service from some patients due to their political belief/leaning.
Yeah, right.

It's cowardice since he's taking out his political loss on his patients instead those on Capitol Hill. You can't fight the big man so you pick on the little guy?:thumbdown:
If all the little guys didn't vote for the big man, the big man wouldn't be there.
 

morning

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He's singling out democrats, not blacks. Homosexuals also tend to almost unanimously vote for democrats. He's not singling them out either.

He's also not singling out trial lawyers. They also almost unanimously vote for democrats and much (?most) of the democratic funds come from trial lawyers.

He's not singling out abortion proponents, or hispanics or any other group that traditionally votes democrat.



From reading this thread, they clearly do.
It doesn't matter if he's not INTENTIONALLY singling out any one ethnic/religious group. It is the consequence of his actions anyway. Yes, the things you do have consequences, even if you never meant for them. I'm as surprised as you are.

Honestly, officer, I didn't MEAN to hit that kid with my car, I just had to take the call on my cell phone and it couldn't wait. Are we cool now?
 

Brigade4Radiant

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What the heck is with the argument you haven't experience X so you can't criticize Y? If that is the case don't ever criticize malpractice lawyers or politicians because you didn't have to go through what they went through to get their position.
 

7starmantis

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It doesn't matter if he's not INTENTIONALLY singling out any one ethnic/religious group. It is the consequence of his actions anyway. Yes, the things you do have consequences, even if you never meant for them. I'm as surprised as you are.

Honestly, officer, I didn't MEAN to hit that kid with my car, I just had to take the call on my cell phone and it couldn't wait. Are we cool now?
:smack:

Consequences of breaking the law are much different than consequences of practicing freedom of speech. To try and connect something like this to race is the very core of racism itself. Just say you dont agree with him and leave it at that. Going further shows your ass.
 

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This urologist isn't doing anything illegal. Just from a PR point of view it's kind of stupid because it looks awful.

He should be blaming George W. Bush for some of his problems because he gave the Republican Party a bad rep which helped Obama win the election and all those Democrats on Capitol Hill.
 

azrael87

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I'm not even going to look at the ethics of the matter. I'm going to look at the pointlessness of it.

The health care bill is passed. It's law. Before, this doc's actions could potentially influence the opinions of other citizens and in the long run the congressmen who represent said citizens. This could potentially have influenced the results of the process (though not likely). Now that the issue has been resolved (for better or worse), it's basically just whining about the past.

I look at it this way: it's like if all the physicians in the country are playing a game of golf. Generally speaking, you play the ball as it lies. Let's say the passing of the health care bill has placed the ball in a potentially, but not necessarily, bad position. The player can just deal with it, analyze their position, and hit the ball accordingly. They can also b!tch and moan about the crappy place the ball is in, then proceed to hit it anyway. Finally, they can just quit playing the game because of how displeased they are with where the ball has ended up.

Now I can't say for sure how I'll feel about life in 8 years (after med school and all/most of residency), but I'm more inclined to just play the damned game because whining doesn't make it any easier no matter how much I might wish it did. Also, I don't know about you guys, but it annoys me when someone can't just play the game without constantly complaining about how bad its going for them. It doesn't really hurt anyone, but it is friggin annoying. That's what this whole thing amounts to really.

EDIT: This is where the earlier picture equating the doc to a kindergartener comes from. With his sign, the doc is basically saying "This sucks...and it's your fault! So go away!!!"
 
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I think it says a lot about his character and really goes beyond just losing money or patients. It is selfish and uncalled for. Save it for your own time when a person isn't putting their trust in you to make them better.
:thumbup:
 

ChiDO

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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/os-mount-dora-doctor-tells-patients-go-aw20100401,0,7224897.story

MOUNT DORA — A doctor who considers the national health-care overhaul to be bad medicine for the country posted a sign on his office door telling patients who voted for President Barack Obama to seek care "elsewhere."

"I'm not turning anybody away — that would be unethical," Dr. Jack Cassell, 56, a Mount Dora urologist and a registered Republican opposed to the health plan, told the Orlando Sentinel on Thursday. "But if they read the sign and turn the other way, so be it."

The sign reads: "If you voted for Obama … seek urologic care elsewhere. Changes to your healthcare begin right now, not in four years."

Estella Chatman, 67, of Eustis, whose daughter snapped a photo of the typewritten sign, sent the picture to U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson, the Orlando Democrat who riled Republicans last year when he characterized the GOP's idea of health care as, "If you get sick, America … Die quickly."

Chatman said she heard about the sign from a friend referred to Cassell after his physician recently died. She said her friend did not want to speak to a reporter but was dismayed by Cassell's sign.

"He's going to find another doctor," she said.

Cassell may be walking a thin line between his right to free speech and his professional obligation, said William Allen, professor of bioethics, law and medical professionalism at the University of Florida's College of Medicine.

Allen said doctors cannot refuse patients on the basis of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation or disability, but political preference is not one of the legally protected categories specified in civil-rights law. By insisting he does not quiz his patients about their politics and has not turned away patients based on their vote, the doctor is "trying to hold onto the nub of his ethical obligation," Allen said.

"But this is pushing the limit," he said.

Cassell, who has practiced medicine in GOP-dominated Lake County since 1988, said he doesn't quiz his patients about their politics, but he also won't hide his disdain for the bill Obama signed and the lawmakers who passed it.

In his waiting room, Cassell also has provided his patients with photocopies of a health-care timeline produced by Republican leaders that outlines "major provisions" in the health-care package. The doctor put a sign above the stack of copies that reads: "This is what the morons in Washington have done to your health care. Take one, read it and vote out anyone who voted for it."

Cassell, whose lawyer wife, Leslie Campione, has declared herself a Republican candidate for Lake County commissioner, said three patients have complained, but most have been "overwhelmingly supportive" of his position.

"They know it's not good for them," he said.

Cassell, who previously served as chief of surgery at Florida Hospital Waterman in Tavares, said a patient's politics would not affect his care for them, although he said he would prefer not to treat people who support the president.

"I can at least make a point," he said.

The notice on Cassell's office door could cause some patients to question his judgment or fret about the care they might receive if they don't share his political views, Allen said. He said doctors are wise to avoid public expressions that can affect the physician-patient relationship.

Erin VanSickle, spokeswoman for the Florida Medical Association, would not comment specifically.

But she noted in an e-mail to the Sentinel that "physicians are extended the same rights to free speech as every other citizen in the United States."

The outspoken Grayson described Cassell's sign as"ridiculous."

"I'm disgusted," he said. "Maybe he thinks the Hippocratic Oath says, ‘Do no good.' If this is the face of the right wing in America, it's the face of cruelty. … Why don't they change the name of the Republican Party to the Sore Loser Party?"
 
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I'm not even going to look at the ethics of the matter. I'm going to look at the pointlessness of it.

The health care bill is passed. It's law. Before, this doc's actions could potentially influence the opinions of other citizens and in the long run the congressmen who represent said citizens. This could potentially have influenced the results of the process (though not likely). Now that the issue has been resolved (for better or worse), it's basically just whining about the past.

I look at it this way: it's like if all the physicians in the country are playing a game of golf. Generally speaking, you play the ball as it lies. Let's say the passing of the health care bill has placed the ball in a potentially, but not necessarily, bad position. The player can just deal with it, analyze their position, and hit the ball accordingly. They can also b!tch and moan about the crappy place the ball is in, then proceed to hit it anyway. Finally, they can just quit playing the game because of how displeased they are with where the ball has ended up.

Now I can't say for sure how I'll feel about life in 8 years (after med school and all/most of residency), but I'm more inclined to just play the damned game because whining doesn't make it any easier no matter how much I might wish it did. Also, I don't know about you guys, but it annoys me when someone can't just play the game without constantly complaining about how bad its going for them. It doesn't really hurt anyone, but it is friggin annoying. That's what this whole thing amounts to really.

EDIT: This is where the earlier picture equating the doc to a kindergartener comes from. With his sign, the doc is basically saying "This sucks...and it's your fault! So go away!!!"
Aside from the absurdity of comparing a profession and thousands of peoples' entire lives and careers to a golf game, I don't understand how you can believe this.

You're saying we should just accept the status quo, no questions asked? Had everybody done this, there would be no United States, people would still own slaves, and women would not be allowed to vote. There would be no such thing as unions and workers' rights.

For that matter, why aren't doctors allowed to unionize or exercise collective bargaining? I am appalled that you, as a potential future doctor, have no problem with others stepping on your potential future career. I think that same attitude is why doctors get trampled by everybody else.
 

RogueUnicorn

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Aside from the absurdity of comparing a profession and thousands of peoples' entire lives and careers to a golf game, I don't understand how you can believe this.

You're saying we should just accept the status quo, no questions asked? Had everybody done this, there would be no United States, people would still own slaves, and women would not be allowed to vote. There would be no such thing as unions and workers' rights.

For that matter, why aren't doctors allowed to unionize or exercise collective bargaining? I am appalled that you, as a potential future doctor, have no problem with others stepping over your potential future career. I think that same attitude is why doctors get trampled on by everybody else.
it's one thing to have an opinion, another entirely to shove in everyone's face, especially when they are coming to you for care.
 
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I wasn't really referring to the Florida doc in question, more to azrael's post.

But regarding the thread topic:
I agree that what the doc did was callous and a little dick-ish.

That said, at least he is making the issue known to the public. How many others in medicine are able to or do voice their dissent publicly? Why do you think the public still views doctors as rich, arrogant elitists that treat patients between rounds of golf and driving to their mansions in Ferraris? It's because doctors don't speak up.
 

RogueUnicorn

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I wasn't really referring to the Florida doc in question, more to azrael's post.

But regarding the thread topic:
I agree that what the doc did was callous and a little dick-ish.

That said, at least he is making the issue known to the public. How many others in medicine are able to or do voice their dissent publicly? Why do you think the public still views doctors as rich, arrogant elitists that treat patients between rounds of golf and driving to their mansions in Ferraris? It's because doctors don't speak up.
in a completely unethical and overbearing manner. he only got away with this (if he does indeed gets away with it) because of the right-leaning district he practices in. there is ZERO silver lining to his actions. they are inappropriate in both setting and tone.

i also find hard to believe the public's perception of the physician is as you describe.
 

Caesar

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He didn't withhold public service. Did you read the article? He didn't turn anyone away, but he just hoped some left on their own.
He is intimidating his patients.

This is unethical.
 

azrael87

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Aside from the absurdity of comparing a profession and thousands of peoples' entire lives and careers to a golf game, I don't understand how you can believe this.

You're saying we should just accept the status quo, no questions asked? Had everybody done this, there would be no United States, people would still own slaves, and women would not be allowed to vote. There would be no such thing as unions and workers' rights.

For that matter, why aren't doctors allowed to unionize or exercise collective bargaining? I am appalled that you, as a potential future doctor, have no problem with others stepping on your potential future career. I think that same attitude is why doctors get trampled by everybody else.
:eyebrow: How very melodramatic...

It's not absurd comparison. It's called a metaphor. It is sometimes used for the sake of simplicity in conveying a concept. In such cases it is supposed to be on a lower scale than the concept it symbolizes in order to shave focus down to the point being made. People do it all the time. Don't read too much into it.

As for accepting the status quo and not asking questions: I didn't question free speech or suggest people shouldn't express their opinions in appropriate forums. If rebelling and asking questions about the health care bill was actually having an effect now, then that would be fine. It isn't here. This thing is a law now. It's over. People now need to deal with it. They also need to get informed about it. His pamphlets, though clearly of a very right-winged perspective, are a decent idea and can do that just fine. The sign, however, is simply silly whining. It's immature even without the big moral issues it brings up.

I don't see anyone stepping on my future career here, and I don't see doctors getting trampled on by anyone else. Hence, my lack of problem. So far, I've yet to see major confirmation that this whole thing is going to screw me over much, if at all. If it does, I'll brush myself off and keep moving. It's more efficient to act on the new circumstances than to waste time reacting to what caused them. The point I made was simple and honest. You shouldn't be so easily appalled. Such passion is better directed elsewhere.
 

7starmantis

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Now that the issue has been resolved (for better or worse), it's basically just whining about the past.
I'm not sure this is an accurate statement, could be absolutely correct, but a bit premature I would say.

As to the doctor, who cares? I could see the care issue more if this was an emergency clinic or something, but its his private practice. Who cares if he talks his way right out of business? There are others who would be happy to have his patients. Who cares if the guy is a jerk, are we seriously going to go after every jerk that practices medicine, get a long list ready. I dont see the point really.

Did ChiDO just post a link back to this thread?
 
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I wasn't really referring to the Florida doc in question, more to azrael's post.

But regarding the thread topic:
I agree that what the doc did was callous and a little dick-ish.

That said, at least he is making the issue known to the public. How many others in medicine are able to or do voice their dissent publicly? Why do you think the public still views doctors as rich, arrogant elitists that treat patients between rounds of golf and driving to their mansions in Ferraris? It's because doctors don't speak up.
heh don't speak up doesn't make up 100% of the problem since there is also an issue of whos going to believe what doctor are telling them. much like a crazy person rambling about world coming to an end in 2012, he/she could be right, but he/she is unlikely to be taken into consideration. doctors aren't crazy, but if some people sees doctors as arrogant ass$^&#s, the doctors opinon is also unlikely to be heard even if outspoken. crazy doesn't equal to elitism, but i hope you see my point.

i do not discourage outspokenness though, there are bounded to have some body believe those doctors, this issue has to be made into newspapers or TV to have a much broader audience.
 

azrael87

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I'm not sure this is an accurate statement, could be absolutely correct, but a bit premature I would say.

Did ChiDO just post a link back to this thread?
*le shrug* Perhaps you're right and it is a little premature. I'm just not aware of any big difference that can come about in the law before the next administration solely due to public opinion. That's all I was really saying. Granted, I'm not as savvy on the political process as I could be so it's possible I missed something.

And yes, he certainly did lol.
 

cpants

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I always get a chuckle when med students(some of whom have never worked a day in their life) come to premed forum and compete for "who's-the-most-jaded" award.

This doctor was not looking out for quality medical care, he was withholding an essential public service from some patients due to their political belief/leaning. It's cowardice since he's taking out his political loss on his patients instead those on Capitol Hill. You can't fight the big man so you pick on the little guy?:thumbdown:
Medicine is not an essential public service when you are in private practice. It's a business arrangement. If pt's don't like the sign the can go elsewhere. It's not the doctor's problem.

I know he's not physically refusing care but rather using indirect tactics(very smart move). He may be within his rights to refuse care but what if your action affects 95% of African Americans? Some of his black patients might ignore the sign at the door and still go in for care but I wonder how many will be turned away by the sign?
92% of college professors voted for Obama too. What's your point? It's not a racist thing. You have a right not to be discriminated against for your race, gender, religious background, sexual preference, or disability in any place of business. You don't have a right to not be offended by signage in the office.

It's obviously not a race thing, but let's say it was. He would be equally within his rights to hang a sign that says "I hate Black people" in his office, as long as he doesn't turn anyone away for treatment. Frankly, he's doing you a service by hanging up a moronic sign, because you realize he's an ass at the door and can seek treatment from a more reasonable urologist elsewhere.
 

45408

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He is intimidating his patients.

This is unethical.
There's no intimidation here. Nobody's going to break their legs or yank out their Foley if they voted for Obama.
 

cpants

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It's not unethical, it's unprofessional. Big difference.
 

MegaProjectile

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Medicine is not an essential public service when you are in private practice. It's a business arrangement. If pt's don't like the sign the can go elsewhere. It's not the doctor's problem.
Doctors provide an essential public service whether you are in PP or academia. Doctor’s in PP are still governed by Stark Laws prohibiting strikes and unionizing etc.


92% of college professors voted for Obama too. What's your point? It's not a racist thing. You have a right not to be discriminated against for your race, gender, religious background, sexual preference, or disability in any place of business. You don't have a right to not be offended by signage in the office.
College professors are not a protected group. The government and the AMA have been trying for decades to increase medical access to minorities groups especially blacks who tend to have the worst medical outcomes study after study. I wonder how many were turned away by the sign and had to wait for weeks to see a new urologist because of their political beliefs? Even if some ignored the sign and went to see the doctor, I can tell you that the medical care will suffer since patients will be hesitant to communicate freely. Patient A in the waiting room: “My gosh, this guy think I voted for Obama since I’m black, I wonder how he’s going to treat me now? I mean he says he’d prefer not to treat guys like me. How will I know I’m getting a good care?”

It's obviously not a race thing, but let's say it was. He would be equally within his rights to hang a sign that says "I hate Black people" in his office, as long as he doesn't turn anyone away for treatment. Frankly, he's doing you a service by hanging up a moronic sign, because you realize he's an ass at the door and can seek treatment from a more reasonable urologist elsewhere.
Well that’s the problem. He didn’t say, “I hate democrats”, he told them to go seek treatment else. The correct comparison would be for him to say “Black people, go seek treatment else”. Do you think blacks will go inside to find out if he really meant what he was saying??
 

7starmantis

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Anyone see this guy get owned on anderson cooper 360?
Just watched it. Dont know that I would say he got owned, but definitely showed his interest in "controversy". He did what he wanted to do, I gotta say things like this keep pushing me more and more libertarian about freedoms. Let the man do what he wants I wish more people would be so transparent in their ideas, would make for a world with much less BS in it.

Edit: I also would say, I dont go to a specific doctor because I know s/he shares any one of my beliefs. I go because they are a good physician and I need care. Those who would refuse to go to a doctor who they knew believed differently form them may need to check their own prejudices. While this sign is a bit incendiary, I dont think the principle of speaking your mind is that terrible, even for a doctor.
 

7starmantis

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Patient A in the waiting room: “My gosh, this guy think I voted for Obama since I’m black, I wonder how he’s going to treat me now? I mean he says he’d prefer not to treat guys like me. How will I know I’m getting a good care?”
:smack:

A lot of conjecture both in your "reenactment" and their thought process.
Just saying.
 
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:smack:

A lot of conjecture both in your "reenactment" and their thought process.
Just saying.
True enough, but it's not face-palm worthy. We already know that people are much more axious about receiving care from folks of different ethnicities or social backgrounds. It's not unreasonable to hypothesize that this would make things more difficult.

Personally, I'm of the opinion that seeing a physician is stressful enough as it is, especially if you're already sick. Additional distractions, regardless of what they might be, shouldn't be present as I think it would reduce the comfort of patients. Just my two cents though, as I don't think we should regulate comfort.
 

MegaProjectile

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A lot of conjecture both in your "reenactment" and their thought process.
Just saying.
The doctor verbally stated that he prefers not to treat Obama supporters (although he won’t deny care if asked. Humbly asked, I suppose.). There is a 95% chance the black guy in the waiting room voted for Obama. As an African American male, I won’t bother setting foot in that office. But if I did, you can be assured that I will be questioning the medical care I’m about to receive.
 

BrainBuff

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The Florida Board of Medicine has already stated its position. The doctor has not broken any laws, nor any directives from the Board of Professional Regulation, therefore, the Board wont be reviewing any complaints for possible disciplinary action.

If there is any kind of bias from his part, it's a political bias and there are no protections against that - unlike towards race, sex and religion.

So, yes. He may tell Obama supporters to go elsewhere.
 

DrBowtie

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It's not unethical, it's unprofessional. Big difference.
Ah...the great catch all term that is unprofessional. You can look forward to a barage of emails from your medical school about the topic.
 

DrBowtie

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Doctors provide an essential public service whether you are in PP or academia. Doctor’s in PP are still governed by Stark Laws prohibiting strikes and unionizing etc.


College professors are not a protected group. The government and the AMA have been trying for decades to increase medical access to minorities groups especially blacks who tend to have the worst medical outcomes study after study. I wonder how many were turned away by the sign and had to wait for weeks to see a new urologist because of their political beliefs? Even if some ignored the sign and went to see the doctor, I can tell you that the medical care will suffer since patients will be hesitant to communicate freely. Patient A in the waiting room: “My gosh, this guy think I voted for Obama since I’m black, I wonder how he’s going to treat me now? I mean he says he’d prefer not to treat guys like me. How will I know I’m getting a good care?”

Well that’s the problem. He didn’t say, “I hate democrats”, he told them to go seek treatment else. The correct comparison would be for him to say “Black people, go seek treatment else”. Do you think blacks will go inside to find out if he really meant what he was saying??
Stark Laws mainly focus on kickbacks and self referrals. It largely has to do with physicians owning stake in a healthcare facility to which they refer their patients to.

Physicians that are employed (not independently contracted) are allowed to unionize and strike. See WV ER and Trauma docs maybe 5 years ago.
 

7starmantis

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The doctor verbally stated that he prefers not to treat Obama supporters (although he won’t deny care if asked. Humbly asked, I suppose.). There is a 95% chance the black guy in the waiting room voted for Obama. As an African American male, I won’t bother setting foot in that office. But if I did, you can be assured that I will be questioning the medical care I’m about to receive.
Thats a bit of an overstatement. He didn't say he "prefers not to treat Obama supporters" he simply said go elsewhere. As an African American you have that right, wait, as an American you have that right. The truth is though, your questioning of the care is your own choice.

I'm not condoning the guy, but to make far reaching assumptions is I think grasping at straws.
 
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The doctor verbally stated that he prefers not to treat Obama supporters (although he won’t deny care if asked. Humbly asked, I suppose.). There is a 95% chance the black guy in the waiting room voted for Obama. As an African American male, I won’t bother setting foot in that office. But if I did, you can be assured that I will be questioning the medical care I’m about to receive.
 

cpants

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Ah...the great catch all term that is unprofessional. You can look forward to a barage of emails from your medical school about the topic.
Yeah tell me about it. In this case it applies though.
 
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True enough, but it's not face-palm worthy. We already know that people are much more axious about receiving care from folks of different ethnicities or social backgrounds. It's not unreasonable to hypothesize that this would make things more difficult.QUOTE]


I don't see why people would be more anxious of getting treated by someone of a different race, I certaintly don't. But I do agree the doctor would make things awkward for the patients.
 
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True enough, but it's not face-palm worthy. We already know that people are much more axious about receiving care from folks of different ethnicities or social backgrounds. It's not unreasonable to hypothesize that this would make things more difficult.QUOTE]


I don't see why people would be more anxious of getting treated by someone of a different race, I certaintly don't. But I do agree the doctor would make things awkward for the patients.
I'm not sure either to be honest, but I've read a few studies about it in class (can't remember the authors off-hand).
 

MegaProjectile

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Thats a bit of an overstatement. He didn't say he "prefers not to treat Obama supporters" he simply said go elsewhere. As an African American you have that right, wait, as an American you have that right. The truth is though, your questioning of the care is your own choice.

I'm not condoning the guy, but to make far reaching assumptions is I think grasping at straws.
According to the article, "he said he would prefer not to treat people who support the president." Perhaps I'm overreaching but my point is that if doctors start putting their political party preference at the door, minority groups with homogenous voting patterns will be most affected. I don't think that's good news for health care in general. You can disagree.
Again, I'm not saying this doctor is racist or is targeting blacks. I'm pointing out how far this road can travel and some unintended consequences since some posters here were so quick to champion him. My two cents and I'm done with this thread.
 

tncekm

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According to the article, “he said he would prefer not to treat people who support the president.” Perhaps I’m overreaching but my point is that if doctors start putting their political party preference at the door, minority groups with homogenous voting patterns will be most affected. I don’t think that’s good news for health care in general. You can disagree.
Again, I’m not saying this doctor is racist or is targeting blacks. I’m pointing out how far this road can travel and some unintended consequences since some posters here were so quick to champion him. My two cents and I'm done with this thread.
Seriously, who cares? There is no overt racism, and some other urologist will just get more business.
 

tncekm

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That doctor does not actually know how the bill affects him.

He confesses so in an interview.

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2010_04/023191.php
How would he know? It's 2,700 pages of beauracratic crap that won't be implemented for 4 years. Nobody knows. At best, a few privileged people can make educated guesses. What he does know is that a power shift took place that he's uncomfortable with. (Unfortunately, I don't know how sincere he is given his wife's run for a GOP position. Might be coincidence, might not.)