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Future of Pediatric Neuropsychology?

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ayexsapanda

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Hello everyone. I was wondering if anyone had any perspectives/standpoints on how the future of clinical neuropsychology is headed (approximately 5-15 years)? I've heard from multiple sources that the advancement in technology would eventually diminish the neuropsychology field. Any opinions on the future of this field? Thank you.
 

ayexsapanda

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In addition, I've heard about the PsyD and PhD in clinical psychology. I sort of know the difference between the two, but is it true that people who hold PhDs tend to excel financially than people who hold PsyDs?
 

psych.meout

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Hello everyone. I was wondering if anyone had any perspectives/standpoints on how the future of clinical neuropsychology is headed (approximately 5-15 years)? I've heard from multiple sources that the advancement in technology would eventually diminish the neuropsychology field. Any opinions on the future of this field? Thank you.
Which sources?
 

psych.meout

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Similar threads claimed so.
Ah, so that's one "source," this forum. I thought you were referring to some scholarly resource, like an APPCN presentation or paper.

Regardless, which threads claimed "the advancement in technology would eventually diminish the neuropsychology field?"
 

erg923

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but is it true that people who hold PhDs tend to excel financially than people who hold PsyDs?

Likely, and I think there is data on this, but I'm not in a pubmed mood today.

I say "likely" because less debt equals higher net worth and more spending power and results in declining job offers that have insulting salaries or fee splits. For example, our local state prisons are filled with mostly Psy.Ds who work for 45-65k/year! Ridiculous if you ask me.

Although not nearly as prominent as 20-30 years ago, Ph.D.s still have more general job prospects within psychology and in businesses/jobs that utilize psychological elements/principles (marketing, industry, managed care, corporate leadership and org development, healthcare data/outcome research, etc).
 
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PsychFL91

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APA salary survey breaks down the difference between the two.

PhD Salary: Median = 85k, Mean = 102.9k, SD = 72,472

PsyD Salary: Median = 75k, Mean = 88.7k, SD = 64,585

SDN won't let me post a link, but just google "apa psychology salary survey 2015" for the full article. It wasn't clear though if this is just for clinical psychology or all psychology fields, but should give somewhat of a ballpark.
 

erg923

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APA salary survey breaks down the difference between the two.

PhD Salary: Median = 85k, Mean = 102.9k, SD = 72,472

PsyD Salary: Median = 75k, Mean = 88.7k, SD = 64,585

SDN won't let me post a link, but just google "apa psychology salary survey 2015" for the full article. It wasn't clear though if this is just for clinical psychology or all psychology fields, but should give somewhat of a ballpark.

I realize we all know what "median" means statistically, but just wanted to caution if this possibly might reflect early career psychologists (ECPs), as opposed to those working in the field 5 years or more?? Albeit, I am no longer in a traditional healthcare service/delivery environment, I am well above that median and the mean. And many of those I know are too...even those employed by hospital systems in direct clinical service roles. I am not in a high COLA either.

That said, see my previous post about some of the individuals (mostly Psy.D.s) working for our state's DOC. Maybe they have lucrative side work, IDK, but its just hard for me to imagine someone working at that level, with that amount of risk, for that pay.

State benefits are nice, but usually don't match fed benefits (for example), and I don't think the math would add up however you slice it. Unless maybe its your second career/job within the field?
 
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psych.meout

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I know we all know what "median" means statistically, but just wanted to caution if this possibly might reflect ECPs, as opposed to those working in the field 5 years or more?? Albeit, I am no longer in a traditional healthcare service/delivery environment, I am well above that median and many of those I know are...even those employed by hospital systems in primarily clinical service roles. I am not in high COLA either.

That said, see my previous post about some of the individuals (mostly Psy.D.s) working for our state DOC. Maybe they have lucrative side work, IDK, but its just hard for me to imagine someone working at that level, with that amount of risk, for that pay.
Would you be willing to post more about your work?

We get a lot of posts about more typical general clinical roles and neuropsych specifically, but I think it would be helpful for those of us in grad school to hear more about other career options and outcomes.
 

erg923

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Would you be willing to post more about your work?

We get a lot of posts about more typical general clinical roles and neuropsych specifically, but I think it would be helpful for those of us in grad school to hear more about other career options and outcomes.

PM sent.
 
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