Going to class is a con?

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Fluidity of Movement

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Premed here,

It seems that the majority of people prefer places that don't have mandatory classes. It does seem strange though that people are paying crazy tuition to sit in their apartment and study Anki. But I understand that this is very important for steps.

What do you guys consider to be useful face-to-face interactions in preclinical? I could see how typical lecture might be less useful, but I would expect medical school to be very good at teaching people how to be doctors.

I've heard of problem-based learning and case-oriented stuff and step one style exams.

Just asking for everyone's thoughts on the issue since I know that lecture styles and attendance policies are big factors for a lot of people.

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Face to face stuff - physical exam workshops. Maybe anatomy lab for some. Besides that, nothing
 
Non-mandatory lectures is the best of both worlds. If that learning style suits you, great, go to lecture, if it doesn't, great.

It depends how your curriculum is set up. Ideally you are tested on basic science knowledge with exams made from NBME Q-banks so you aren't stuck studying things (PhD interests) that wouldn't be on your boards. And can study the material using whatever resources you desire.

There is only so much time in a day. If going to class makes your learning experience significantly less efficient (compared with outside resources), you may elect to skip class and learn that info in half the time, which gives you more flexibility to do whatever matters to you most (relaxing, shadow, exercise, friends, research, more studying, etc.). The emphasis on our side hustles continues to grow as things become more P/F. You will likely feel the pressure to figure out what specialty you like quite early on, and if it's something competitive that requires a lot of prep, things that get in the way of that prep (mandatory stuff) that don't directly help you meet your goal can feel like a burden.

You will want a school that balances giving you the MOST free time and flexibility possible while also giving you a lot of support for learning clinical skills and doing research.
 
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Moving to premed.

It honestly depends on your school and your learning style. Some schools, you can teach yourself just as well as the profs. For some people, in person instruction helps. And for some schools, they write tests in a way that makes it hard to just study for the boards and you really need to know the minutiae they are testing. So it’s hard to give advice that applies for all med schools
 
Premed here,

It seems that the majority of people prefer places that don't have mandatory classes. It does seem strange though that people are paying crazy tuition to sit in their apartment and study Anki. But I understand that this is very important for steps.

What do you guys consider to be useful face-to-face interactions in preclinical? I could see how typical lecture might be less useful, but I would expect medical school to be very good at teaching people how to be doctors.
Team based learning events
 
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I was trying to ask the med students what if any in person stuff they liked. Not sure they are going to come over here to answer :)
I suspect they will. But while pre-meds are welcome to participate in discussions anywhere, we try to have new threads posted in the appropriate forums (ie pre-meds post in pre-med, med students post in med student) so that the med student forum isn't overrun with premeds asking questions. Of course there are exceptions.
 
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I suspect they will. But while pre-meds are welcome to participate in discussions anywhere, we try to have new threads posted in the appropriate forums (ie pre-meds post in pre-med, med students post in med student) so that the med student forum isn't overrun with premeds asking questions. Of course there are exceptions.

Don't check the psych forums ^=^ I definitely haven't been posting there
 
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