Dec 10, 2010
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I am a fairly decent standardized test taker (178 LSAT, 780 GMAT) who would like to take the MCAT to teach and tutor it (as well as for the fun of it). I have taken gen chem and gen bio, but it has been a few years. I have not taken orgo or college physics (just a class in high school).

I also do not have a ton of time to devote to the test, since I am currently working pretty much full time. But I do have a knack for tests and quickly see the patterns in them.

I plan on looking at a chem and bio textbook and taking a physics course online, but would obviously like to focus on the essentials and then refine if I need to. I will also use EK for verbal and BR for bio/chem/phy.

With that being said, what would be the most optimal way to study the substantive material covered by the exam? What are the most tested concepts from bio, chem, and physics?


Thanks in advance!
 

Pons Asinorum

Moderator Emeritus
7+ Year Member
Jul 30, 2010
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Attending Physician
Hmmm...where would one find such information...

p.s. You likely won't find a very sympathetic audience around here; doing well on the MCAT isn't a vanity test for most of the people who hang out around these parts.

p.p.s. Based on raw numbers, I'm a much better standardized test than you are, and doing well on the MCAT requires a bit more knowledge than the pattern recognition needed to do well on GMAT math questions. But I wish you the very best of luck.


I am a fairly decent standardized test taker (178 LSAT, 780 GMAT) who would like to take the MCAT to teach and tutor it (as well as for the fun of it). I have taken gen chem and gen bio, but it has been a few years. I have not taken orgo or college physics (just a class in high school).

I also do not have a ton of time to devote to the test, since I am currently working pretty much full time. But I do have a knack for tests and quickly see the patterns in them.

I plan on looking at a chem and bio textbook and taking a physics course online, but would obviously like to focus on the essentials and then refine if I need to. I will also use EK for verbal and BR for bio/chem/phy.

With that being said, what would be the most optimal way to study the substantive material covered by the exam? What are the most tested concepts from bio, chem, and physics?


Thanks in advance!
 
OP
B
Dec 10, 2010
2
0
Status
Hmmm...where would one find such information...

p.s. You likely won't find a very sympathetic audience around here; doing well on the MCAT isn't a vanity test for most of the people who hang out around these parts.

p.p.s. Based on raw numbers, I'm a much better standardized test than you are, and doing well on the MCAT requires a bit more knowledge than the pattern recognition needed to do well on GMAT math questions. But I wish you the very best of luck.
One can only hope you treat your patients with a little more respect (and provide a little more info). The MCAT is not a vanity test for me. I happen to like standardized exams and think this would be a good challenge.
 

Pons Asinorum

Moderator Emeritus
7+ Year Member
Jul 30, 2010
4,006
351
The Dirty South
Status
Attending Physician
One can only hope you treat your patients with a little more respect (and provide a little more info). The MCAT is not a vanity test for me. I happen to like standardized exams and think this would be a good challenge.
Shocked you could read through the posts at the link I sent you that quickly. Regardless, it sounds like the two of us have different definitions of vanity test. Like I said, best of luck. If you do quite as well on the MCAT as trying to strike me about the head and shoulders with the self-righteous stick, you'll go far towards winning your good-natured game of beat-the-challenging-standardized-test-for-fun game.

As for me, I'll get back to cooking up interesting ways to belittle patients and withhold information.

Cheers!
 

indygobu

Lifetime student
Sep 22, 2010
70
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Indianapolis, IN
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This here commotion reminds me of a House episode.
 
Nov 8, 2010
6
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If what you have in mind is to teach and tutor the MCAT, there is no need to study the subjects in depth, if you can teach yourself the content. There are questions that merely based on memorization. For these questions, there is nothing much to teach as you can quickly look up (or draw on your memory) the required knowledge. And then there are questions that you need skills to arrive at the credited response. This is what you should be focusing on, and these skills don't come from just reading the text book.