Meredith92

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Hey guys,
I'm looking for a job for my year off and was wondering if "state of residence" for medical school should play into my decision. I've been thinking about: new york, dc, new jersey, massachusetts. Do you think there would be a benefit of moving to one of these states if it would also help to get into their state school? Would it help at all for private schools in those states?
Thanks for your help!
 
Nov 21, 2012
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You should call the schools, but honestly you probably won't get residency living there for just one year and you might lose residency in your home state. I know for a fact that umass requires you to have lived in MA for 5 years or have graduated from an MA high school and currently be living in the state.
 

MedPR

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Hey guys,
I'm looking for a job for my year off and was wondering if "state of residence" for medical school should play into my decision. I've been thinking about: new york, dc, new jersey, massachusetts. Do you think there would be a benefit of moving to one of these states if it would also help to get into their state school? Would it help at all for private schools in those states?
Thanks for your help!
You should look at what is necessary to qualify for residency. One year of working there isn't always enough. My vote is NY though. Lots of pub schools.

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Meredith92

Meredith92

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Oh wow, I didnt know that. Thanks thats really helpful. I'll call up some of the schools in NY, and if they dont accept a year in state I'll probably just stick to my home state (jersey)
 

Mountaineer12

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You'll probably need to change your license, voters registration, and vehicle registration. Along with filing taxes as an independent and being able to prove you are 100% cut off from your parents financially. At least that's what I've had to do WV, it's probably similar in other states, but I would look at each school's website to be sure.
 

uva11

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this should ABSOLUTELY play into your decision. it's something that i briefly considered then eventually disregarded when choosing a gap year job. i would also advise you not to move to DC, even though it's an amazing city.

i lived in VA my entire life and attended college there, then moved into DC for the last 2 years since graduation. after a lengthy and painful process, i have now been told (after labeling myself a Virginian on my primary) that i am a resident of DC (and therefore out of state everywhere). now all 4 of the schools i could have paid ~30k yearly to attend are now a cool 55k+, comparable to some of the highest private schools in the country. i have spoken with numerous people in financial aid with these schools about my situation but unfortunately none of them can help me. i also never changed my drivers license, voters registration, or any other official documents EXCEPT i file taxes in DC. you need to have all of these things to be considered a resident. exceptions apply to full time students and/or young adults who are listed on their parents' tax returns as dependents. however, anyone who has financially supported him or herself fully knows that letting someone else file you as a dependent means way less $$ in the pocket for you. i know some people who have gotten away with filing taxes illegally in VA while actually living in DC, but i obviously would not advise that.

sorry for the long response, but this has been a huge factor in my application cycle that i found it difficult to find information on before i applied. my decision on where i will matriculate is now likely different than it would have been had i chosen to live 5 miles away in Arlington. so be careful!

edit: forgot to note that there is no advantage in being a DC resident when applying to Gtown and GW. according to GWs stats and "desirable" criteria, i am a stellar applicant but they have shown me no love.
 

gyngyn

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Hey guys,
I'm looking for a job for my year off and was wondering if "state of residence" for medical school should play into my decision. I've been thinking about: new york, dc, new jersey, massachusetts. Do you think there would be a benefit of moving to one of these states if it would also help to get into their state school? Would it help at all for private schools in those states?
Thanks for your help!
Of the states you have listed the one with the highest percentage IS matriculation rate is New York at 30%, NJ and MA tie at 20% and DC is lowest at 15%.
 
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Meredith92

Meredith92

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Thanks! And just to clarify- private schools like Columbia, Harvard, tufts, mt Sinai etc.. Dont take in state into account? Or is it school specific?
 

gyngyn

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Thanks! And just to clarify- private schools like Columbia, Harvard, tufts, mt Sinai etc.. Dont take in state into account? Or is it school specific?
Although there may sometimes appear to be in state bias for some private schools it is usually just a preference of the applicants to apply and stay near home. Schools like some you mentioned are most interested in training leaders in medicine, not regional workforce enhancement.
 

gakirby

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Although there may sometimes appear to be in state bias for some private schools it is usually just a preference of the applicants to apply and stay near home. Schools like some you mentioned are most interested in training leaders in medicine, not regional workforce enhancement.
TCMC is an example of a private school that undoubtedly has a region bias in favor of those from northeast Pennsylvania.

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gyngyn

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TCMC is an example of a private school that undoubtedly has a region bias in favor of those from northeast Pennsylvania.

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Exactly. The not yet approved for-profit school in Stockton (CA) also has a regional workforce mission statement. In contrast, HMS and Columbia are under no pressure to serve the overserved in their respective local communities!
 
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Although there may sometimes appear to be in state bias for some private schools it is usually just a preference of the applicants to apply and stay near home. Schools like some you mentioned are most interested in training leaders in medicine, not regional workforce enhancement.
I feel like applicant bias leads to school bias. Medical schools want to accept students who all end up attending. It makes the school look better. If a private school in New York has two similar applicants, one from NY and one from California, I'd expect them to pick the NY applicant 9/10 times because they see the Californian applicant as potentially hurting their yield numbers. I've gotten the question "you're from State X, why did you apply to med school all the way out here?" more than once during interviews at out-of-state private schools.
 

gyngyn

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Yes, this is possible, but private schools generally have a much larger applicant pool and higher scores and diversity are valued more than yield.