Aug 8, 2017
1
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Ever since high school, I've always done things when I feel like it, never really having a tinge of consistency. All this was able to work until I got to college when there was actual responsibilities and greater demand of personal independence. Then it hit me, but it's just so difficult to develop it now.

What keeps you motivated to follow a routine in the long term?

Was it worth it in the end?
 

Siromas

Non-Traditional livin'
2+ Year Member
Aug 17, 2016
507
632
Status
Pre-Medical
While I'm nowhere near "the end" (if there is such a thing as a physician), shadowing really helped me realize that this is the right path for me. Surrounding and immersing yourself in the field helps you create the big picture that we're all here working towards. It's a long and difficult path where an inch of preparation (MCAT study plans/pre-writing secondaries, etc) can save you miles of effort later.

Reading success (and failure) stories also helps with motivation and coming up with a plan for yourself.

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DBC03

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
2,432
2,975
Florida
www.thegracefuldwelling.com
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Scheduling: One thing that has helped me is to develop a schedule that enables me to stick to certain habits but also gives me some mental time off. I find that I am very diligent about studying when I am at school, so when I am on campus I try to get as much done as possible. If I have flexibility in planning classes, I'll try to schedule them early so I'm on campus as soon as possible. I also have some habits that help. I workout right when I get up and that helps my day get going. And I realize my pitfalls, so I try to avoid them. I deleted facebook from my phone and hardly ever check it. I'll probably be off SDN in two weeks when school starts back up. And I give myself a break periodically. This is crucial.

And just as the poster above said, I found that shadowing and volunteering this past year really kept me on track. It reminded me why I was doing this. It helps if you find a specialty or activity that really resonates with you.

Is it worth it? Check back in August of next year when I find out if I am going to med school or not. I did well on the MCAT, so my discipline for studying on campus really helped with that. And I'm trying to be disciplined with getting my applications completed at medical schools this year. Part of what makes it worth it is knowing that you've pushed pretty hard during the week and then doing something completely random and unplanned. I like a combination of routine and spontaneity, so it's the little random unplanned activities that often make working hard worthwhile.
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

*breathes in* boi
Moderator
2+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2016
15,403
23,168
Status
Medical Student
Accountability really helps you develop discipline. When you have to answer to someone--even informally--about what you're doing and what you've done, it keeps you honest and going.
 

Gilakend

7+ Year Member
Aug 24, 2012
1,516
2,643
Status
Medical Student

Jocko all day man.

One of my favorite things he has said was about taking breaks. Basically he says if you wake up and think "I should take it easy today" don't. Most of the time you'll be half way through the day and realize you didn't need a break, you were just being weak or lazy. If you're into the day and you feel awful or you're sick, then you might need some rest. But 95% of the time when we think we need a break we're just being lazy. Don't give into the instant gratification of being lazy. He's very intense on his podcasts but the advice is solid.
 
Aug 1, 2017
22
22
Status
Pre-Medical
Ever since high school, I've always done things when I feel like it, never really having a tinge of consistency. All this was able to work until I got to college when there was actual responsibilities and greater demand of personal independence. Then it hit me, but it's just so difficult to develop it now.

What keeps you motivated to follow a routine in the long term?

Was it worth it in the end?
For me, motivation derives from knowing what I want to do, figuring out how to do what I want to do, and being mature enough to get the linkage between my goals and actions taken to reach those goals.
 

theonlytycrane

5+ Year Member
Mar 23, 2014
1,959
1,704
Status
Medical Student
Listen to "Started from the bottom" every morning while you brush your teeth.


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P0ke

M3
2+ Year Member
Nov 8, 2015
429
584
Status
Medical Student
You can either deal with the pain of discipline now, or you'll have to deal with the pain of regret later. Do you want to be 50 years old looking back on a life of "could've beens?"
 

Tenk

10+ Year Member
Jan 5, 2007
2,188
7,195
Status
Attending Physician
I was always into the reward for good behavior. I.e. If I study x I can have a break for y. Also, it helped that my best friend who was also my roommate in college shared courses and common interests so we could kind of motivate each other to do better. Friendly competition so to speak goes a very long ways and can hold you accountable so you don't look bad.
 
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