Obscure

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May 23, 2015
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So I did the first reading that we have to do for our Anatomy course.

And holy **** that's a lot of info. Does anyone have any advice about the best way to study/memorize anatomy? I'm not sure where to start.
 
Feb 9, 2013
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Yea don't read much. I mean if thats really how you learn...but I never read for anatomy. Its all about making pictures/representations in your head.

Videos, youtube, PPT slides if they give lectures, drawing stuff out yourself, then quizzing/flash cards. The UMichigan anatomy site is one alot of people use. The link is probably on a sticky somewhere, but theres alot of similar stuff to be found by googling.
 

futuremdforme

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May 12, 2013
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Image occlusion flashcards with real cadaver pictures, with the structure names covered out. (One picture can make 15 cards depending on how much is labelled.)
 
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FindMeOnTheLinks

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Jan 25, 2014
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Lab: quiz yourself using Rohen's atlas, spend time with your cadaver, do UMich practical quizzes.

Lecture: review lecture Powerpoints, make anki cards for MSK origins/actions/insertions/blood supply,make anki cards for clinical correlations, read BRS Gross anatomy and do the end of chapter questions, then do UMich written questions.

Anatomy is all about relationships. To learn the important anatomical relationships, do a ****e load of questions and you'll get the hang of it really quickly.


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Obscure

2+ Year Member
May 23, 2015
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Thanks for the advice guys! Does anyone know whether the Netter's Anatomy Flash Cards are any good?
 

Promethean

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Thanks for the advice guys! Does anyone know whether the Netter's Anatomy Flash Cards are any good?
If you learn well from flashcards, maybe?

I had a set that went basically untouched. I played with them a little, but they were not nearly as helpful as the endless free online resources that I had access to at all times.
 

arewethereyet...

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I found the app essential anatomy 5 to be quite helpful for MSK. I think it cost 20 or 25$, but it's a 3D representation that you can zoom in and out of and you can take away the muscles one by one or start out just looking at bones and it has the insertion, innervation, function, etc. for each muscle and it shows nerves too. You can take quizzes on it. It really helped me visualize things.
 

mbeus

mbeus
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Feb 18, 2012
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I honored and this is what worked for me (doesn't mean it will work for you, though):

For written:
Went to class and tried my very best to pay attention :)
Learned (by flashcard) every muscle's origin, insertion, innervation, and function because my school tested this a lot
Did Gray's anatomy review questions - these are really great for nailing down above
When I studied, I would always have Netter's open next to me. I was constantly looking at it to give myself an idea of where things were, etc. Keep in mind, though, that the real body looks nothing like the drawings. Still, I found this really helpful, and it made me more prepared for time in the lab.

For lab practical:
SPEND A LOT OF TIME IN THE LAB WITH THE CADAVERS. I can't stress this enough. For my first exam, I didn't realize how important this was, and my practical grade reflected that.
I would go in and do the dissection (honestly kind of half-assed most of them because I didn't like dissecting)
But I would try and go in almost every day, even just for an hour, and practice finding stuff on our structure list. I found that going in with a friend or two was best, because you can agree/disagree on what's what (trust me - in head and neck, it's reeeeeally difficult to tell stuff apart)
By the day before the test, I was able to go to any body in the lab and find any structure on our list.
This strategy worked super well for me. I got 100% on nearly every practical doing this
 
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OnePunchBiopsy

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I was an anatomy tutor during second year. Here is what helps those struggling:

Lecture: Make Anki cards or outlines regarding important lecture topics. Anatomy textbook/Qbank questions help solidify material.

Lab: many, Many, MANY trips to the lab. Also look at other people's cadavers!

AOI's: Anki notecards