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humoral and cell mediated responses (some confusion)

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by gooperwooper, Jul 29, 2015.

  1. gooperwooper

    2+ Year Member

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    Hi guys,

    I'm working through feralis notes right now and he seems to not have gone too deeply into the humoral and cell mediate responses. I'll post what I have gotten from his notes -- is this really all you need to know for the biology portion? I'm just mainly concerned with the b/t cell and how they work for this part.

    b cells originate and mature in bone marrow and contain 5 types of immunoglobins (G A M E D ), or antibodies. when they attach to antigens, they mark for macrophage or natural killer cell phagocytosis, lysis by complement proteins, agglutination of antigenic substance, or chemical inactivation (if a toxin). then proliferation occurs through clonal selection into 2 types of b cells memory and plasma. memory b cells don't release antibodies but perform 2ndary response. plasma b cells produce specific antibodies.

    t cells originate in bone marrow and mature in thymus (destroyed if they attack self antigens), and go to lymphoid tissue. produce 4 types of cells upon binding to antigen (again with clonal selection): cytotoxic (releases perforin to lyse cells), helper t cells (stimulates b cells, cytotoxic t cells, and surppresor t cells), suppressor t cells, and memory t cells (like memory b)

    Here's also what I'm confused about:

    1) what activates B cells? Feralis says B cells are activated by binding to antigen but it doesn't seem to go over the whole story. A source online says "In a primary antibody response, naïve helper T cells are activated in a peripheral lymphoid organ by binding to a foreign peptide bound to a class II MHCprotein on the surface of a dendritic cell. Once activated, the effector helper T cell can then activate a B cell that specifically displays the same complex of foreign peptide and class II MHC protein on its surface ". True?

    2) how does the production of interleukins by Helper B cells stimulate proliferation of t cells/b cells if you need to have clonal selection so you're making cells that recognize the right type of antigen? Will interleukins just proliferate every b/t cell it can find?
     
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  3. dannybobanny182

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  4. gooperwooper

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    this is perfect lol thanks
     
  5. OSUkid

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    What class typically cover this stuff?
     
  6. gooperwooper

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    well my first year bio class covered it
     

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