am I doomed?

  • Yes

    Votes: 8 34.8%
  • No

    Votes: 2 8.7%
  • Why are you here

    Votes: 13 56.5%

  • Total voters
    23
Sep 1, 2015
21
18
i'm graduating with an AA in highschool
thing is
my college GPA is a 3.05
my sGPA is a 2.30
if i get all A’s for the last two semesters before I graduate highschool I can get a 3.44 college GPA and maybe a 2.5 sGPA
is there any hope for me?
i'm doomed
 
  • Like
Reactions: Meeehai
OP
O
Sep 1, 2015
21
18
im honestly really scared here
i always wanted to be a doctor but now it looks like its over
im in my senior year of high school but graduating with an AA and my GPAs are so low
 
  • Like
Reactions: Meeehai

samac

2+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2014
1,822
2,445
Status
Medical Student
Is AA some weird way of referring to associates degree?
I'm really confused and disoriented by this post.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Orientaddled

NotASerialKiller

2+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2015
1,457
6,866
Status
Medical Student
im honestly really scared here
i always wanted to be a doctor but now it looks like its over
im in my senior year of high school but graduating with an AA and my GPAs are so low
In case you're not just trolling I'll give you a serious response. I doubt anyone understands your question. When you say your "college GPA is 3.05" do you mean your cumulative GPA? Or your GPA for college? Or your GPA from AP courses only? Are you asking whether you'll get into college? You might have to focus on using clear language, because your first description was insufficient. Also I don't know what an 'AA' is, but that might just be because of my Canadian ignorance.
 

LizzyM

the evil queen of numbers
10+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2005
23,184
32,880
Status
Academic Administration
Your school, and perhaps your parents, did you a great disservice in placing you in college level courses before you were ready to take your studies seriously.

If I understand your post, you completed about 60 college credits while in HS and will be awarded an associate of arts degree (AA) at HS graduation but your GPA in these courses in about a B with a GPA of less than B in the science courses.

Schools pitch this as a way to save money in college because you can now go directly to a university and finish a bachelor's degree in only 2 years. Financially a good move, perhaps, but for an academically demanding program like medicine, a very bad move.

My advice would be to get into the best college (university) you can and start over. Do not ask to have any of your college work count toward your degree. Start with chemistry 101, biology 101, physics 101, etc. Under no circumstances should you be talked into taking organic chem as a freshman. don't dig a deeper hole than you are already in.

The bad news is that you are obligated to report these college grades earned while still in HS but the good news is that four years of good grades in college can mitigate the damage you've suffered. You still have a chance to prove that you have the academic chops to do well in medical school. Go out and prove it!
 
OP
O
Sep 1, 2015
21
18
Your school, and perhaps your parents, did you a great disservice in placing you in college level courses before you were ready to take your studies seriously.

If I understand your post, you completed about 60 college credits while in HS and will be awarded an associate of arts degree (AA) at HS graduation but your GPA in these courses in about a B with a GPA of less than B in the science courses.

Schools pitch this as a way to save money in college because you can now go directly to a university and finish a bachelor's degree in only 2 years. Financially a good move, perhaps, but for an academically demanding program like medicine, a very bad move.

My advice would be to get into the best college (university) you can and start over. Do not ask to have any of your college work count toward your degree. Start with chemistry 101, biology 101, physics 101, etc. Under no circumstances should you be talked into taking organic chem as a freshman. don't dig a deeper hole than you are already in.

The bad news is that you are obligated to report these college grades earned while still in HS but the good news is that four years of good grades in college can mitigate the damage you've suffered. You still have a chance to prove that you have the academic chops to do well in medical school. Go out and prove it!
nothing i did is worth keeping?
i haven't taken any of those courses yet
i took botany and its lab
then two low level algebra courses
a low level chemistry course ( lower than gen chem)
even if i can get my gpa up it's not worth keeping?
is there anyway i can keep the credits ( if the gpa is better at the end of this semester) but still have more than two years at a university to get the GPA higher and study for the MCAT?
 

Dr.Sticks

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,118
620
Status
Pre-Medical
Not really;
You can always do a 2nd major
Which will raise your GPA a lot
So Double Major in university, that's what I suggest.

Also I'm assuming the OP is in a "middle" college type program..
Basically you start your junior year at a local CC or maybe a university and graduate with an Associates, as well as a H.S diploma
Getting in isn't super easy either.. You have to have a minimum 3.75 GPA at many programs.
 

Dr.Sticks

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,118
620
Status
Pre-Medical
oh and before I forget!
If you haven't done any ECs, 2 years isn't enough to do ECs, research, leadership type stuff, win awards, etc..
So you'll have to go at least 3 more years anyways if you haven't started on ECs
 

LizzyM

the evil queen of numbers
10+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2005
23,184
32,880
Status
Academic Administration
nothing i did is worth keeping?
i haven't taken any of those courses yet
i took botany and its lab
then two low level algebra courses
a low level chemistry course ( lower than gen chem)
even if i can get my gpa up it's not worth keeping?
is there anyway i can keep the credits ( if the gpa is better at the end of this semester) but still have more than two years at a university to get the GPA higher and study for the MCAT?
You don't get to decide what to "keep". All of this is on your permanent record.
If what you took is lower than general chem and lower than intro biology, then you still need to take all of those classes plus enough classes to meet the requirements of a bachelor's degree. Maybe that can be accomplished in two years but maybe not. Unless you go to a cash-strapped state school that is going to toss you out after 120 credits, do your best to stay in school and earn 120 credits or more after HS graduation. If nothing else, the more classes you can take in the university the more you can mitigate a poor GPA from college classes take in HS.

I would recommend spending at least three years in college and then taking a gap year in which you work and apply or spend four years in college with the application in your fourth year. The reason is that beyond classes and the MCAT, you need to engage in clinical experience (volunteer and/or employment and/or shadowing), community service (volunteering to help those in need), demonstrations of teamwork and leadership, and research experience. It is almost impossible to fit all of that in during 2 years of college. Furthermore, students who are 21-22 when they apply are more likely to be successful at gaining admission that students who apply at younger ages. This isn't age discrimination but might be based on having an application that is lighter in the experience section or a perception that the applicant has insufficient maturity to be ready for medical school.
 
OP
O
Sep 1, 2015
21
18
You don't get to decide what to "keep". All of this is on your permanent record.
If what you took is lower than general chem and lower than intro biology, then you still need to take all of those classes plus enough classes to meet the requirements of a bachelor's degree. Maybe that can be accomplished in two years but maybe not. Unless you go to a cash-strapped state school that is going to toss you out after 120 credits, do your best to stay in school and earn 120 credits or more after HS graduation. If nothing else, the more classes you can take in the university the more you can mitigate a poor GPA from college classes take in HS.

I would recommend spending at least three years in college and then taking a gap year in which you work and apply or spend four years in college with the application in your fourth year. The reason is that beyond classes and the MCAT, you need to engage in clinical experience (volunteer and/or employment and/or shadowing), community service (volunteering to help those in need), demonstrations of teamwork and leadership, and research experience. It is almost impossible to fit all of that in during 2 years of college. Furthermore, students who are 21-22 when they apply are more likely to be successful at gaining admission that students who apply at younger ages. This isn't age discrimination but might be based on having an application that is lighter in the experience section or a perception that the applicant has insufficient maturity to be ready for medical school.
thank you for taking me seriously
I neither expect to nor want to graduate in two years, I know that's not enough time
I just don't want to start over as there are some credits I earned A's in that do correspond with my major and I do not wish to re-do those classes.
If I do have extra time and a good enough GPA after I do earn a bachelors, would it be worth it to pursue a higher level graduate study such as a masters? That way I'm making good use of the extra time I have and I'm able to get assistance from academic/job centres about volunteering and scribing
i think the main thing I have to focus on getting higher is my sGPA, as my core college GPA will be a 3.44 if I do get those As , and I don't have many classes that I have taken in science that it will be significantly weighted/difficult (at least I don't think)
 

LizzyM

the evil queen of numbers
10+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2005
23,184
32,880
Status
Academic Administration
Do the best you can and take things one step at a time. Focus at this point on getting out of HS and into college. Things will unfold over time and you'll see the path. Considering a masters degree down the road is a reasonable plan but see where you are in 2-3 years.
 

Dr.Sticks

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,118
620
Status
Pre-Medical
Do the best you can and take things one step at a time. Focus at this point on getting out of HS and into college. Things will unfold over time and you'll see the path. Considering a masters degree down the road is a reasonable plan but see where you are in 2-3 years.
Well he *is* in college haha

Side Note:
Community colleges are fantastic places to earn a lot of scholarship money and get into a top college
If you make phi theta kappa you have it made.. Many colleges will give you a full ride, and won't care about your standardized test scores.
You also have less competition in admissions
 
OP
O
Sep 1, 2015
21
18
Do the best you can and take things one step at a time. Focus at this point on getting out of HS and into college. Things will unfold over time and you'll see the path. Considering a masters degree down the road is a reasonable plan but see where you are in 2-3 years.
sorry for being so neurotic
everything seems very end of the world from my myopic view
thank you everyone for the guidance
i'll try the best i can for these last two semesters, then after graduating HS and getting an AA i'll try and get into one of my state colleges
hopefully they won't force me out after a certain amount of credits
 
Jul 21, 2015
679
912
www.ooooiiii.com
OP these people are your competition, they are trying to fool you to increase their chances of getting in. You have no time to waste, take the MCAT now and you can still apply this cycle.
 

charlie517

Take all the time you need
5+ Year Member
Aug 17, 2012
271
168
WA
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
@Orientaddled are you from FL by any chance o_O?

Overall, listen to LizzyM's posts! And don't worry! I've been there (not as low...but yeah)...and I can offer advice on the topic (if you still require any) via PMs (especially if from FL). Definitely focus on As for the rest of your HS and College classes to up your cGPA AND science GPA. Make sure when/if you apply to a 4 year univ. to continue your studies you DO NOT mess it up anymore. Unfortunately, you do not have that luxury at all. If you get 3.9s and 4.0 for the next two years you CAN up your GPA significantly (but that includes all the science reqs ..so you got hella work ahead). If you are able to...start looking for research the first semester you are there and your options (if you don't mind doing three more years, then better). Consider a second major (that's what I did) if you are doing 3 or more years after graduating with your AA. Aside from that, just take it a day at a time. Get your ECs, make sure you are ready for the academic portion before starting, and if needed take that gap year if needed (so you don't feel forced to do research, school, shadowing and volunteering all at once).

In short: it's not over....if you plan and work hard (much MUCH more than what you've done so far) you can get into A medical school. So don't stress..you got mid-low tier MDs, or DOs, or worse case....abroad! Just don't keep messing up dude! :rolleyes: