Interview question: Why do YOU want MD, and not DO?

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Chris127

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Hey, just wondering what some of you current applicants (and matriculants) would say if the interviewer asked you why you applied to all MD programs and no DO. After all, it is just a degree, and you would both hold the same title afterwards depending on what you went in to (ie, ortho surgery, derm, etc). Therefore, pay is the same, workplace is the same, you are a doctor for petes sake.

So....why did you pick the MD over the DO?
 

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I'm a current DO student and would honestly be very surprised if Allopathic schools asked that question, as it is usually the other way around w/ the DO schools asking why DO (w/ DO being a small minority % of Docs)?

Either way.....you can expect this thread to turn into the inevitable pissing contest....you'll see...
 

TX515

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I can't speak for all osteopathic schools, but TCOM provides a solid medical education. I don't think anything is wrong with a doctor graduating from there, granted they put in work. The problem comes with matching in a competitive allopathic residency and the stigma the OD title carries. It is less known in the general public and often considered second rate by those not in the know.
 
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the negative 1

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Taus said:
Either way.....you can expect this thread to turn into the inevitable pissing contest....you'll see...
No kidding, it happens everytime. What more is there to say that hasn't been said before in these threads?

I'd say lock the thread, but I prefer to be entertained by asinine posts. :D
 

justskipee

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At my GT interview I was talking about my interest in their masters in complementary/alternative medicine and the interviewer asked me: "then why don't you become an DO?"

I didn't have a good answer at the time.
 

Chris127

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TX515 said:
I can't speak for all osteopathic schools, but TCOM provides a solid medical education. I don't think anything is wrong with a doctor graduating from there, granted they put in work. The problem comes with matching in a competitive allopathic residency and the stigma the OD title carries. It is less known in the general public and often considered second rate by those not in the know.
1) I often here pre allo students asking "should I apply to carribean schools or DO!!??" Cmon, DO=DOCTOR

2) Will a DO provide you with difficulty as far as getting matched into an allo residency?
 

Taus

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comonnnn....im procrastinating for my midterm in path/immuno/biochem/nutrition by bs'ing around on these forums...i could use some entertainment right about now...
 

Chris127

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Taus said:
comonnnn....im procrastinating for my midterm in path/immuno/biochem/nutrition by bs'ing around on these forums...i could use some entertainment right about now...
People are sleeeeeeeping......which is what I am going to do... :sleep:

Need to wake up early to take my math final ;)
 

Chris127

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Taus said:
comonnnn....im procrastinating for my midterm in path/immuno/biochem/nutrition by bs'ing around on these forums...i could use some entertainment right about now...
People are sleeeeeeeping......which is what I am going to do... :sleep:

Need to wake up early to study for my math final at 10am ;)


Hmmm, now how did the double post happen? The server is SLOW, so I often hit 'submit' more than once... :oops:
 
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Flame war waiting to happen........... but you deserve an answer anyway.

An analogy -- If I were a football player I'd want to play in the NFL rather than the arena football league.
 

tulane06

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DO is a legit degree....I would probably answer that question by emphasizing that I want to specialize in something, while most (not all) D.O.s go into primary care/family medicine.
 

dajimmers

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Many of my friends are pre-DO's or DO students, so I don't mean anything to sound anti-DO, if it does.

My reasons for MD vs. DO would be:

1. Wishes to specialize vs. primary care, etc.
2. Research interests (then why not DO/PhD).
3. I like this city more (assuming location doesn't also have DO school)
4. Believe MD philosophy is picking up enough "holistic" and "alternative" appreciation to cover much of the DO philosophy (at certain schools)
 

gujuDoc

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dajimmers said:
Many of my friends are pre-DO's or DO students, so I don't mean anything to sound anti-DO, if it does.

My reasons for MD vs. DO would be:

1. Wishes to specialize vs. primary care, etc.
2. Research interests (then why not DO/PhD).
3. I like this city more (assuming location doesn't also have DO school)
4. Believe MD philosophy is picking up enough "holistic" and "alternative" appreciation to cover much of the DO philosophy (at certain schools)

The only thing that I seriously don't like about DO school is OMT and the fact that it is more geared towards primary care.
 
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I'm not sure if there are any REAL differences exept by the elitism which is part of both MD (who think they are better trained out of tradition) and DO (who think they are more holistic) but here we go:

1. The average GPA and MCAT scores for osteopathic matriculants in 2002 were 3.4 and 25, respectively, as compared to 3.45 and 30 at allopathic schools.

2. Allopathic training will give you the option to practice in any of the medical specialties, and, unlike the D.O. (Doctorate of Osteopathic Medicine), the M.D. is universally recognized as a medical degree. If you are interested in practicing overseas, the M.D. is far easier to negotiate with than is the D.O.

3. D.O. programs concentrate more effort on primary care, training strong, general physicians before specialists. They emphasize preventative care and a holistic approach to patient care, treating the whole person, not just symptoms;


4. D.O. programs focus extra attention on musculo-skeletal health and train students in Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment, a unique, hands-on approach to diagnosis and treatment;


5. M.D.s do their clinical rotations in a teaching hospital affiliated with their medical school while D.O.s do their clinical rotations in community hospitals and local doctor's offices;

6. D.O.s must pass the COMLEX board exam to be licensed; in some cases, D.O.s also take the USMLE board exam if they choose to compete for some allopathic residency program;

7. D.O.s have the option of pursuing an osteopathic residency program or applying for a residency through the National Residency Match Program ("The Match") used by allopathic physicians.

One final factor to consider is that, while most D.O.s feel that their training is as strong as, if not superior to, M.D. training, prospective D.O.s should be prepared to be a part of the minority in the medical community. Because they comprise only 6 percent of American doctors, osteopathic physicians must often explain—and sometimes defend—their educational background. When considering the weight of this issue, it may also be useful to consider where you plan to practice. In states such as Pennsylvania and Michigan, osteopathic doctors comprise about 10 percent of all practicing physicians, whereas in many Southern and Southwesters states like Arizona and Arkansas, they make up less than 1 percent of the physician population. If you are not comfortable being part of a misunderstood or minority group, osteopathy may not be a good fit for you.

Whether you chose to become an M.D. or a D.O., medical school is a long and challenging journey that will require stamina, commitment, and a lot of hard work. You will be most successful—not to mention happiest—in a program that fits with your personal philosophy and career goals. Before you apply to any medical school, allopathic or osteopathic, you should carefully consider where you can get the education you need to do the work you want to do.


The best way to decide which path is right for you is to spend time with both M.D.s and D.O.s, and to talk with them about the differences in their practices.


Disclaimer all this info is from www.princetonreview.com
 
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IDforMe

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double post-- oops
 

IDforMe

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gujuDoc said:
The only thing that I seriously don't like about DO school is OMT and the fact that it is more geared towards primary care.
Same here. And while I respect OMT, personally, I am not all that interested in learning it. Just my preference/interests.
 

jbone

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Telemachus said:
Flame war waiting to happen........... but you deserve an answer anyway.

An analogy -- If I were a football player I'd want to play in the NFL rather than the arena football league.
:thumbdown:
 

IDforMe

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Hah. Not doberman food. :)
Kitty was so tired he passed out in the food bowl... kinda like a kid falling asleep face down in a plate of spagetti. I'm lucky not to have fallen asleep in a plate of food recently myself, so this seemed appropriate...
 

Napoleon4000

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Thanks for the complement. I try to be logical and rational. I strive for that. Plus, my ego is inflated since I found out C. Everet Koop is also an INTJ. Lastly, we're human doomed to go back to the ashes from which we came. So, I'm keeping it real. :oops:
 

theunderdog

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i actually got asked that "why not DO" question at my interivew.... this is how it went:

Interviewer: So you love science and medicine, and you make a strong case for why you want to be a doctor. Then why do you want a MD, as opposed to a DO degree??

me: Ummmmm.... (after thinking FAST because the question caught me off guard).... The MD is the mainstream way to go to become a doctor and frankly, I don't know much about the DO education. I've always known about the MD since I was a kid, and the DO has been emerging as something new lately. Plus, I think there is a stigma attached to being a DO.

Interviewer: You know I'm a DO right?

----
disclaimer: i have high respect for both the DO and MD. some of my family members are DOs.
 

letmein!please?

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Chris127 said:
1) I often here pre allo students asking "should I apply to carribean schools or DO!!??" Cmon, DO=DOCTOR

2) Will a DO provide you with difficulty as far as getting matched into an allo residency?


:idea: Carribean = Doctor too :rolleyes:
 
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theunderdog said:
i actually got asked that "why not DO" question at my interivew.... this is how it went:

Interviewer: So you love science and medicine, and you make a strong case for why you want to be a doctor. Then why do you want a MD, as opposed to a DO degree??

me: Ummmmm.... (after thinking FAST because the question caught me off guard).... The MD is the mainstream way to go to become a doctor and frankly, I don't know much about the DO education. I've always known about the MD since I was a kid, and the DO has been emerging as something new lately. Plus, I think there is a stigma attached to being a DO.

Interviewer: You know I'm a DO right?

----
disclaimer: i have high respect for both the DO and MD. some of my family members are DOs.
ouch...where was this at?
 

arkroyal

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i would say that the majority of both MDs and DOs coming out of medical school pursue one of the primary care specialties (internal, family, pediatrics, ob/gyn). The one disadvantage that a DO has I think is getting into some of those super elite residency programs but it is a slight disadvantage. My big problem is people who think carribean medical school education is better than do.
 

jbone

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theunderdog said:
i actually got asked that "why not DO" question at my interivew.... this is how it went:

Interviewer: So you love science and medicine, and you make a strong case for why you want to be a doctor. Then why do you want a MD, as opposed to a DO degree??

me: Ummmmm.... (after thinking FAST because the question caught me off guard).... The MD is the mainstream way to go to become a doctor and frankly, I don't know much about the DO education. I've always known about the MD since I was a kid, and the DO has been emerging as something new lately. Plus, I think there is a stigma attached to being a DO.

Interviewer: You know I'm a DO right?

----
disclaimer: i have high respect for both the DO and MD. some of my family members are DOs.
I bet you were glad you didn't flame the DOs. Interview would have been a little uncomfortable from that point on. "Really? Oh well...let me pull my foot out of my ass and mouth and I'll explain what I meant by..." :laugh:
 

TSisk23

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arkroyal said:
i would say that the majority of both MDs and DOs coming out of medical school pursue one of the primary care specialties (internal, family, pediatrics, ob/gyn). The one disadvantage that a DO has I think is getting into some of those super elite residency programs but it is a slight disadvantage. My big problem is people who think carribean medical school education is better than do.
Im of the opinion that your education is what you make it. Im sure some schools have access to more recognized physicians and state of the art equipment but its each individuals responsibility to become a competent physician. Some DO students make 240+ on the USMLE while some MDs dont pass. Hopefully people dont care but if they do it's not the end of the world.
 

jbone

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DaMota said:
DO?!?! might as well become a DENTIST!!!! HAHHAHAHAHA jk.
-mota
:laugh: nice mota :thumbup:
 

JonnyG

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One thing that should be pointed out that some DO schools produce mainly specialists. PCOM produces fewer primary care physicians than alot of MD programs.

DO's have fewer total number of specialty residencies that are exclusive for DO's, but they alsohave substantially fewer people applying. I would love to see the math on it.(not good at math, so won't be doing that). They can also make a run at the allopathic residencies.

<disclaimer on superiority complex>
I am one of the people who gets annoyed at DO's who say MD's can't be holistic or treat the whole patient. The BS you endure to become and be a doctor is to great now to enter the field for any reason other than wanting to help others.
 

TSisk23

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JonnyG said:
<disclaimer on superiority complex>
I am one of the people who gets annoyed at DO's who say MD's can't be holistic or treat the whole patient. The BS you endure to become and be a doctor is to great now to enter the field for any reason other than wanting to help others.
I agree with you...what a bunch of nonsense.
 

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holy $hit...is this actually a constructive thread?...well I'll be damned.....

Regarding JonnyG's last comment...I fully agree....however you have to realize that that statement by the AOA is a historical one. 30-whatever years ago that statement actually held water as the MD schools did not put nearly as much focus on general health, preventative medicine, nutrition, etc as they do today. The other point to remember is that it wasn't meant to attack allopathic medicine, but I can easily see how in present-day it can seem that way. It really is meant to imply that "treating the patients, not the symptoms" (+OMT) is our philosophy, and how we define ourselves, but does NOT implicitely imply that no one else does that. Some MD schools focus more on those aspects then others, but it really comes down to personality. Many (most) MD's will come out and go into practice w/ a great bedside manner and really seek to get involved in their patients lives, but of course there will be some total d*cks and who dont give a $hit about their patients. On the other side there are will absolutely always be plenty of DO's who don't give a **** about their patients and don't practice holistically. We are taught day-in-and-day-out to practice what we preach, but in the end it is up to the individual person...

damn im good at procrastinating when I reallllly need to be studying...
 
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dilated

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My interviewer: Why do you want MD and not DO?
Me: Cause I want to treat the disease, not the patient. Ka-ching!
Interviewer & I high five enthusiastically.

In reality: blah blah specialization blah blah research blah blah thank god interview season is coming to an end :sleep:
 

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I doubt that an allopathic school would ask this UNLESS your interviewer is DO, or you talked about some amazing experience with a DO in your personal statement.

However, if asked why not DO, I would give the following reasons I chose not to apply DO:

The schools that I was interested in based on match list, reputation, and location were all MD schools (at an interview point out that you want to go to THAT school, and it gives out MD degrees).

DO's have a challenging time if they want to do any kind of international work as some countries do not recognize the degree.
 

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My ONLY reasons for favoring MD over DO are same as many have mentioned before:
1. Not having to take two licensing exams for some of the residencies that interest me
2. No OMT to learn only to never use it again once I get out of school.
3. Easier to specialize from an allopathic school (I'll go to law school after med school and become a malpractice attorney before I become a primary care doc)
 

DrBowtie

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Praetorian said:
My ONLY reasons for favoring MD over DO are same as many have mentioned before:
1. Not having to take two licensing exams for some of the residencies that interest me
2. No OMT to learn only to never use it again once I get out of school.
3. Easier to specialize from an allopathic school (I'll go to law school after med school and become a malpractice attorney before I become a primary care doc)
No OMT during an autopsy? It is a billable procedure.
What about OMT on the biopsy?

Guess a pathologist wouldn't ever use it.
 

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Good one Brett. I actually started a thread on this in the osteopathic forum and got flamed because of it.

Actually I've been leaning away from pathology by the way, just so you know. Now I'm thinking about radiology, invasive cardio or ENT. Anyhow, in any of those OMT's is about as worthless as boobs on a boy dog.
 

DrBowtie

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Praetorian said:
Good one Brett. I actually started a thread on this in the osteopathic forum and got flamed because of it.

Actually I've been leaning away from pathology by the way, just so you know. Now I'm thinking about radiology, invasive cardio or ENT. Anyhow, in any of those OMT's is about as worthless as boobs on a boy dog.
Rads...good choice.
 

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BrettBatchelor said:
Rads...good choice.
I think so. The interventional side of it seems very challenging, which means it is right up my alley.
 

jbone

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Praetorian said:
worthless as boobs on a boy dog.
You can milk anything with nipples you know :eek: . Yes, even a boy dog. ;)
Be nice to the boy dogs, they get no respect. Only the bitches get the love. I hope you learn your lesson.
 

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theunderdog said:
i actually got asked that "why not DO" question at my interivew.... this is how it went:

Interviewer: So you love science and medicine, and you make a strong case for why you want to be a doctor. Then why do you want a MD, as opposed to a DO degree??

me: Ummmmm.... (after thinking FAST because the question caught me off guard).... The MD is the mainstream way to go to become a doctor and frankly, I don't know much about the DO education. I've always known about the MD since I was a kid, and the DO has been emerging as something new lately. Plus, I think there is a stigma attached to being a DO.

Interviewer: You know I'm a DO right?

----
disclaimer: i have high respect for both the DO and MD. some of my family members are DOs.




LOL :laugh:
 

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Taus said:
Regarding JonnyG's last comment...I fully agree....however you have to realize that that statement by the AOA is a historical one. 30-whatever years ago that statement actually held water as the MD schools did not put nearly as much focus on general health, preventative medicine, nutrition, etc as they do today.
30 whatever years ago DOs (prior to 1973), DOs weren't licensed to do everything MDs were in most states. Thus I think DOs had to focus on different things because they were not really in the same field yet. (Someone please feel free to correct me if my history is wrong).
This is likely where a lot of these stigmas originate -- as recently as our parents' day (and that of older MDs) the DO simply wasn't the equivalent degree. Now the only difference is really admissions criteria and a seperate board on SDN.
 

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jbone said:
You can milk anything with nipples you know
On this note, I want to be able to say, "...Oh that's not necessary. You can call me Zoom... MD". Saying "you can call me Zoom, DO" just has an unpleasant ring to it, and it won't be funny at all to die-hard Meet the Parents fans!


Honestly though, my top reasons for applying all allo would be because I don't want to have to do the following every time someone mentions or associates me with MD:

1) Explain that I am not an MD, but a DO
2) Then explain that a DO is really the same thing

3) Or, nod and say.."Yes, MD, mmm-hmm thats me". Even if it's only lying for convenience, it would still bug me.


If you don't want to practice OMT, then aside from the specialty issue they basically are the same... So is it really so wrong to want a convenient, name-brand profession? I mean really, that's why I would go to University of X over Gustavus Aldophus University any day. Is it so wrong to want to be associated with something people often respect automatically? In other words, while this isn't really a reason not to go the DO route, can't it be a valid reason why we choose MD over DO? (these are hypothetical q's)

PC-ness sucks. I'm tired, good night :sleep:
 

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Because I'd applied to enough MD schools that I thought I'd get in somewhere, and I didn't want to write another essay and pay a bunch more money for another (AACOMAS) application!
 

jbone

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TSisk23 said:
Jbone where in SLC. I lived in Layton and graduated from Northridge High School.
Centerville/Viewmont :thumbup:
 

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theunderdog said:
i actually got asked that "why not DO" question at my interivew.... this is how it went:

Interviewer: So you love science and medicine, and you make a strong case for why you want to be a doctor. Then why do you want a MD, as opposed to a DO degree??

me: Ummmmm.... (after thinking FAST because the question caught me off guard).... The MD is the mainstream way to go to become a doctor and frankly, I don't know much about the DO education. I've always known about the MD since I was a kid, and the DO has been emerging as something new lately. Plus, I think there is a stigma attached to being a DO.

Interviewer: You know I'm a DO right?

----
disclaimer: i have high respect for both the DO and MD. some of my family members are DOs.
:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
 

dajimmers

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OK, so I'm too lazy to search for the history, so here's my question (in several parts):

MDs are Medical Doctors (or something similar in Latin), and practice allopathic medicine.

DOs are Doctors of Osteopathy, but why not Osteopathic Doctors? Did they just not want to be OD, for the stigma of Overdose?

And did veterinarians not want to be VD (Veterinary Doctors, or venereal disease), so they chose DVM?

Or should we just switch to DM? I want a consensus!
 

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to OP:

I'd just say that after reading about the origins of osteopathic medicine, and looking for good evidence to support the theory, I just couldn't buy into it enough to be DO for the rest of my life.

Others may come to different conclusions based on the available evidence, but I wasn't convinced.
 

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dajimmers said:
DOs are Doctors of Osteopathy, but why not Osteopathic Doctors? Did they just not want to be OD, for the stigma of Overdose?
OD is the degree an optometrist gets. I think OD might have already been taken.

gujuDoc said:
The only thing that I seriously don't like about DO school is OMT and the fact that it is more geared towards primary care.
Well what else is there that distinguishes a DO from an MD besides those? Hello!

Praetorian said:
Actually I've been leaning away from pathology by the way, just so you know. Now I'm thinking about radiology, invasive cardio or ENT. Anyhow, in any of those OMT's is about as worthless as boobs on a boy dog.
Actually, I've heard of DO's using OMT to treat sinus conditions, etc., so it might be used if you were an ENT.

And you know, in theory, boobs on a boy dog could act as a placebo to puppies if the mother wasn't around. I mean, they say to put a ticking clock (to simulate a heartbeat) in a blanket that smells like you to help keep a puppy calm at night, so boy dog boobs could definitely have potential. :)
 
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