jhu1

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If you have time and start very early reading Harrison Internal Medicine, is that an overkill? is that productive at all?
 
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medInUSA

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How much time exactly do you have?

I don't think "overkill" is the right word. I would say not the most efficient use of your time for the sake of the boards.

are you just starting 3rd year?
 
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jhu1

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How much time exactly do you have?

I don't think "overkill" is the right word. I would say not the most efficient use of your time for the sake of the boards.

are you just starting 3rd year?

Yeh I am just starting 3rd year and like 9 months till internal med rotation
 
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tfom08

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For 3rd year purposes, if you want to really be strong in your IM clerkship, I would suggest reading step up multiple times and really knowing that book. It's about 500 pages. Harrison's is what, 2500? You will read all of that in depth stuff and probably not retain it well the first time through. I'm not saying it's a bad idea, but I don't know that I would have had the free time at any point during 3rd year to put a dent in that book. If you can get through step up a couple of times prior to medicine you will be well ahead of the game.
 
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Scaredshizzles

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For 3rd year purposes, if you want to really be strong in your IM clerkship, I would suggest reading step up multiple times and really knowing that book. It's about 500 pages. Harrison's is what, 2500? You will read all of that in depth stuff and probably not retain it well the first time through. I'm not saying it's a bad idea, but I don't know that I would have had the free time at any point during 3rd year to put a dent in that book. If you can get through step up a couple of times prior to medicine you will be well ahead of the game.
Yea, 2700 pages with about 3x as much text at least on each page as step-up has. Harrison's is a great read, but no way can your mind retain all the key points after going through so much voluminous reading. Now if you had already done step-up a few times, and had some clinical experience, then reading Harrison's might really add some in depth structure to your already solid foundation.

I don't know how well it correlates to the actual step exam, but I will say almost every answer of UWorld medicine questions can be found in lange's current medical diagnosis and treatment. And that book is certainly much more readable than Harrison's...1500 pages, but each page has only about half as much text as Harrison's pages.
 
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medInUSA

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I would recommend knowing your patients really well. Whatever they have read that disease thoroughly in harrison and whatever other source you may choose. That way when the pathology is attached to an actual patient you saw you will definately remember it.
 
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MSKalltheway

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Agree with the previous poster. Pre-reading Harrison's for either Step II or the medicine rotation itself is serious overkill. Reading it for your patients is completely appropriate at this level. Unless you have a photographic memory, there's no way to remember all the stuff in there, it's just too dense. Its a great first resource for nightly reading during your rotation and when you are to make presentations on pathology to the team to supplement an article.

If you want to pre-read anything, read the common, bread and butter medicine stuff like the diagnosis and management of things like HTN, diabetes, sorting through chest pain, syncope, GI bleed, etc. that can be used for pretty much any rotation.
 

MSmentor018

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If you have time and start very early reading Harrison Internal Medicine, is that an overkill?
way, way, way over. it's great to look stuff up that you can't figure out from other sources or tie in diff info/diseases. stick with step up for medicine (it's my favorite) or FA series, secret series (good clinical reading), boards and wards, pocket medicine (IM rotation favorite), recall series (good for pimp) or any usmle step 2 book. some topics are presented better than others. if you absolutely love harrisons' and must read it, use the baby harrisons' or switch to cecils. it's a little easier read for the the time you've got
 

Clemson Doc

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I don't think Harrison's is meant to be read. Harrison's is a reference. If you have a specific topic you need more clarification on, it's great. If you need to study, leave it on the shelf and get something a little higher-yield.
 

DNA 105

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I don't know if this thread is still alive but, I got a couple of queries if anyone feels free to answer.

1. So what, in your opinion, will be the ideal way to 'use' "Harrison's".
2. Which is the 'gold standard' book for internal medicine.

--If the sole aim is to ACE the step - II.

And don't bother asking the rotation details, I'm an IMG.

Appreciations...
 

alphaholic06

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Yes, yes it is!
 

mTOR

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lmao @ reading Harrison's.


the majority of internal medicine residents don't even use that in prep for their ABIM board exam