Isn't it depressing how much longer it's going to take until you start making $?

randombetch

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Thinking about how long the path to financial freedom is for me is making me groan:

  • 2 years of undergrad
  • 4 years of medical school
  • 1 year MPH during med school (since I'm really interested in policy/management)
  • 3 year internal medicine residency
  • 3 years Hem/Onc fellowship
Total of 13 years left! I'll be 33! That means it'll take me just as long as it took for me to get from 1st grade to right now!

I guess it's not all bad though. I'm having tons of fun in college, and I'm sure if I choose the right med school I'll really enjoy the experience. MPH will be like a break for me during med school, and I don't think I'll be too exhausted during my internal medicine residency. After that, it's all smooth sailing.

Hopefully I'll lose my inspiration to become involved in health policy, sell out, and go into dermatology or something :D. Then it'd only take 10 years.
 
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Haha...somedays that's all I can't think of. Other days I'm just so amazed by this whole process and journey that I can't be anything but happy :D
 
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I think on average, this is the age for many to officially start getting a doctors' salary. Unless you're a genius and some how managed to skip college lol.

I am 21 and when I counted up the years of all the education I have to go through, it was kind of depressing. Very rewarding after though so that's ok.
 

DrSmooth

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Thinking about how long the path to financial freedom is for me is making me groan:

  • 2 years of undergrad
  • 4 years of medical school
  • 1 year MPH during med school (since I'm really interested in policy/management)
  • 3 year internal medicine residency
  • 3 years Hem/Onc fellowship
Total of 13 years left! I'll be 33! That means it'll take me just as long as it took for me to get from 1st grade to right now!

I guess it's not all bad though. I'm having tons of fun in college, and I'm sure if I choose the right med school I'll really enjoy the experience. MPH will be like a break for me during med school, and I don't think I'll be too exhausted during my internal medicine residency. After that, it's all smooth sailing.

Hopefully I'll lose my inspiration to become involved in health policy, sell out, and go into dermatology or something :D. Then it'd only take 10 years.
You'll actually be making $, just not $$$, by age 27. And I'm 35, so quit whining! ;)
 
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I think on average, this is the age for many to officially start getting a doctors' salary. Unless you're a genius and some how managed to skip college lol.

I am 21 and when I counted up the years of all the education I have to go through, it was kind of depressing. Very rewarding after though so that's ok.
we would have used our most preciouse/youth for almost nothing tho. i dunno what life is going to be like during 40s, i sure hell know that i will never have my 20s back. i have this friend of mine got this job for like 80g starting, thats not including bonuses. honestly by the time when we finish our residency, he would have gotten a house already.
 

CaliGirl14

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+pity+ Oh boo-hoo go cry us a river.

Umm, hello, did you not realize you weren't going to make top money right away when you signed up to become a doc? :rolleyes:
 

randombetch

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+pity+ Oh boo-hoo go cry us a river.

Umm, hello, did you not realize you weren't going to make top money right away when you signed up to become a doc? :rolleyes:
Oh jeez, another self-righteous pre-med implying her indifference towards "top money" and the lengthy training?

Did you even read my post? I explicitly stated that I will definitely enjoy the process and so it's not that bad.
 
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Yeah, which is why first year i thought i would do engineering, than i realized i needed to pursue something i enjoy and the sacrifice is worth the end result.
 

CaliGirl14

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Oh jeez, another self-righteous pre-med implying her indifference towards "top money" and the lengthy training?
Oh jeez, another person who can't read. I'm pretty sure I didn't say anything about not wanting to earn 'top money', but I did indicate that it will take some time to earn it. Sorry, I don't like complainers.
 

apumic

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Enjoy the ride... the money will come... or maybe not if this healthcare bill doesn't get repealed soon ;)
 

organdonor

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You know you get paid during residency, right? You can expect a salary of about 45k through residency, and some offer kick as$ benefits
https://freida.ama-assn.org/Freida/user/pgmPolicies.do

Think of it this way. You will really be doing everything that you want to do when you graduate from medical school. You will be taking care of patients, getting paid (at least some), YOU ARE A DOCTOR.
 

randombetch

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Oh jeez, another person who can't read. I'm pretty sure I didn't say anything about not wanting to earn 'top money', but I did indicate that it will take some time to earn it. Sorry, I don't like complainers.
I'm pretty sure I didn't say you said anything about not wanting to earn "top money." Do you know what the word "imply" means? Should have learned it in 7th grade English.

And you accuse me of not being able to read? :laugh:

Sorry, I don't like self-righteous pre-meds.
 

randombetch

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Think of it this way. You will really be doing everything that you want to do when you graduate from medical school. You will be taking care of patients, getting paid (at least some), YOU ARE A DOCTOR.
That's true, and that's very important, but I'd still be relatively poor.

I've been poor my entire life, and I'm going to have to remain financially disadvantaged until I'm 33. Getting sick of having trouble paying for flights, dental work, nice food, etc.
 

CaliGirl14

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I'm pretty sure I didn't say you said anything about not wanting to earn "top money." Do you know what the word "imply" means? Should have learned it in 7th grade English.

And you accuse me of not being able to read? :laugh:

Sorry, I don't like self-righteous pre-meds.
Um, that still wouldn't matter. I didn't imply it and I didn't say it.
 

caveat87

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I don't really find this notion depressing. Then again I don't really mind living on a budget as a single dude. I imagine if I had a family right now making money quickly would matter significantly more.
 

GoSpursGo

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I'll really enjoy the experience.
Ding ding. You just have to keep that in mind. Everyone has their bad days, but I really do enjoy med school the vast majority of the time; after all, I think most of us got into this because we found it legitimately interesting on some level, no? It's not time wasted if you're enjoying it :)
+pity+ Oh boo-hoo go cry us a river.

Umm, hello, did you not realize you weren't going to make top money right away when you signed up to become a doc? :rolleyes:
*shrug* Of course they realized it. Everyone is still allowed an, "Oh crap, what am I doing to myself???" day every now and then.
 

Narmerguy

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*shrug* Of course they realized it. Everyone is still allowed an, "Oh crap, what am I doing to myself???" day every now and then.
If only it stopped there.
 

bobsmith

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Well, it's not as depressing as the idea of sitting behind a desk and hating 40 hours of my life every week for the rest of my life
 

dingyibvs

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And at 33, you'll be thinking "dang, isn't it depressing how much longer it's gonna take until I can retire to a life of luxury?"

Like Spurs said, just enjoy the ride :)
 

oaklandguy

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You need to start hustling. Maybe start off small, like pedaling "snow" or something. I personally imagine diversifying my income by taking my main right now and having her become a madam. I'll give her all my current workers and making her give me 50% of her profits. I'll then find some new upper class girls and start an escort service with them, my main (the madam) can also work as an escort because she definitely has what it takes. I can also have the escorts pedal for my higher income customers. If an escort gets shot it's all good, I can have my hired goons take care of the situation. If a worker gets shot it's no biggie, those are easy to find, just gotta do some recruiting at the corner or in the parking lot at malls in the ghetto. I then setup a money laundering scheme and have my money laundered to my swiss bank account through an actual laundromat (no one would suspect illegal activity out of a laundromat). I can't pedal product out of the laundromat, because that would be like spitting in the face of the DEA. However, that can be a safe house for my workers if their not out working the streets. At this same time, I will convince my organic chemistry T.A's to work for my lab. In my lab we make "desoxyn" and I'll pay them a very nice salary. In order to not get caught I will actually purchase high quality homes for the T.A.'s to live in, but will build the labs in their basement. It would be clutch if I get could get a prof in on this because then we could just cook the product after-hours in a lab at school. I can't pedal my meth out of the same spots as I do my "snow" because it appeals to a different market. That's something I need to really think about when my entrepreneurship progresses. I know for sure that I will need to get rid of the gangster competition and will do so by framing them. If tension builds I can hire ex-military veterans as hitmen.

I may need to lower my class-load to be able to fully manage my business in the future, but as of right now I am in the black and am in no need to make any money in the near future.

I ain't got a money printer
So for this paper chase I'm out runnin' sprinters
Yes the last two Cash Money members
Shout out to the new Cash Money members
Baby and Slim still point guard and center
So much money on my mind it's all I remember
 

Hoody

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Thinking about how long the path to financial freedom is for me is making me groan:

  • 2 years of undergrad
  • 4 years of medical school
  • 1 year MPH during med school (since I'm really interested in policy/management)
  • 3 year internal medicine residency
  • 3 years Hem/Onc fellowship.
  • I'm so confused. I thought you were a frosh at Princeton. How in the heck did you make it through undergrad in 2 years? that's pimp brother! :woot:

or maybe you already finished 2 years and only have 2 years left. yes. that would make much more sense. :idea:


Either way, Heme/Onc seems cool.
 

circulus vitios

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You make $40-50k/year as a resident. It'ss pretty well-off by the rest of the US, at least when you forget about the quarter million in student loans and the 60+ hour work week.
 

RogueUnicorn

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randombetch made another thread about money? wow the sun must have risen in the east
 

JoshUNCW

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Eh, I'm taking a year or two off before medical school and working in the IT industry. Save some money. Buy a nice car and a small boat. Live modestly, put the rest in a bank account. That why when I actually start med school I can have the money to relax and go out on the boat on the weekends.
 
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Yeah... the 10 years before I have purchasing power really tempted me to just go engineering when I was thinking about it a few months ago, but I decided I wouldn't like engineering nearly as much.
 

RogueUnicorn

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i would love to be an engineer but that ship is hard to catch once you're down with undergrad it seems
 

JoshUNCW

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Engineering is a good way to go. And since it's just an undergraduate degree, you can always become a doctor or something else later on. It's not like you invest years of grad school in it.
 

ArkansasRanger

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No, what's worse is when you have a good job, good income, retirement, insurance, a home, and you decide to throw it all away so you can go back to school full-time to take chemistry and physics and then gamble everything you've ever done in a desparate effort to get accepted to some medical school based on some idea that you've had over the last decade of your life and thus being subjected to someone's else's whims which will dictate whether you get to have your real life back after four additional years of schooling.

I'd never pursue an additional degree such as an MPH, and I'd never be able to pursue a fellowship.
 

randombetch

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randombetch made another thread about money? wow the sun must have risen in the east
bleargh making a cynical comment that contributes nothing towards discussion? wow the sun must have risen in the east
 

RogueUnicorn

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bleargh making a cynical comment that contributes nothing towards discussion? wow the sun must have risen in the east
:laugh: hard to argue with that one. one thing, though, where is the discussion in this thread? your OP is nothing more than a random rant that you seem to go off on like clockwork.

edit: you're calling ME the cynic? haha hello pot, i'm kettle.
 

austinap

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Not really. I enjoy what I do, I enjoy learning, and even if it gets me stressed out from time to time, money isn't really the point for me. It'd be nice to have the financial freedom to do whatever you want, but from my experience, even people that have it don't utilize it to actually make life more enjoyable. Learning, traveling, working with smart people, that sort of stuff makes me happy. I've been able to do that thus far on a very low budget. Money only improves those things a little bit to me.
 

Geekchick921

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Ugh, I know. It's depressing.
 

MilkmanAl

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To add a cheery thought to this thread, it actually gets worse once you start med school. It's a lot like someone telling you that you have to run a marathon. "Well, that sucks," you think to yourself, but then you show up and discover that you're actually going to be running the marathon with no shoes and carrying a 50-pound backpack, all while getting pelted with rocks thrown by people in truck that's keeping pace with you the whole way. That is, those 11 years of training will sound a hell of a lot worse once you get going and find out what you're in for.

Just for the record, I actually like med school a lot, but it's definitely really freaking tough in a lot of ways.
 
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i would love to be an engineer but that ship is hard to catch once you're down with undergrad it seems
Engineering is a good way to go. And since it's just an undergraduate degree, you can always become a doctor or something else later on. It's not like you invest years of grad school in it.
Yeah... with the job market right now, it's not quite as easy. Plus, I don't have internship experience because I spent my summers doing pre-med stuff/classes. =X
 

marble30

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To add a cheery thought to this thread, it actually gets worse once you start med school. It's a lot like someone telling you that you have to run a marathon. "Well, that sucks," you think to yourself, but then you show up and discover that you're actually going to be running the marathon with no shoes and carrying a 50-pound backpack, all while getting pelted with rocks thrown by people in truck that's keeping pace with you the whole way.

Moving past 'slightly depressed' into :eek: territory, but then I can't say I'm that surprised.
 
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4 + (3-5) = 7-9 more years :(

And I still won't be able to get that M5 because Ill be paying $2000 a month back on loans.
Unless you're going to be making some incredible cash you shouldn't have to pay $2000 a month. Starting in July you only have to pay 15% of your discretionary income, at least on federal loans.
 

thesauce

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Unless you're going to be making some incredible cash you shouldn't have to pay $2000 a month. Starting in July you only have to pay 15% of your discretionary income, at least on federal loans.
That's technically true if you don't mind a bunch of interest accruing. With IBR, you'll be looking at $300-$500/mo to cover the subsidized interest and some of the unsubsidized interest. If you want to pay off the rest of the unsubsidized interest, you'll have to throw in another $500-$1000/mo. And that only keeps you even. If you want to actually pay down the loans, you may pay around $2000/mo, depending on how much you owe.
 

Depakote

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Thinking about how long the path to financial freedom is for me is making me groan:

  • 2 years of undergrad
  • 4 years of medical school
  • 1 year MPH during med school (since I'm really interested in policy/management)
  • 3 year internal medicine residency
  • 3 years Hem/Onc fellowship
Total of 13 years left! I'll be 33! That means it'll take me just as long as it took for me to get from 1st grade to right now!

I guess it's not all bad though. I'm having tons of fun in college, and I'm sure if I choose the right med school I'll really enjoy the experience. MPH will be like a break for me during med school, and I don't think I'll be too exhausted during my internal medicine residency. After that, it's all smooth sailing.

Hopefully I'll lose my inspiration to become involved in health policy, sell out, and go into dermatology or something :D. Then it'd only take 10 years.
Do your really think the first years of your practice as an attending will be "smooth sailing?"

You might finally getting real income, but you're attempting to establish a practice, pay off loans, not to mention that you might be wanting to buy a house and/or car and have kids. You're practicing under your own license here... meaning you've lost the protective umbrella you've been used to operating under for so many years. The liability for any mistakes you make falls squarely on you.

As milkmanal points out, it really only gets harder as you go along.
 

Parts Unknown

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To add a cheery thought to this thread, it actually gets worse once you start med school. It's a lot like someone telling you that you have to run a marathon. "Well, that sucks," you think to yourself, but then you show up and discover that you're actually going to be running the marathon with no shoes and carrying a 50-pound backpack, all while getting pelted with rocks thrown by people in truck that's keeping pace with you the whole way. That is, those 11 years of training will sound a hell of a lot worse once you get going and find out what you're in for.

Just for the record, I actually like med school a lot, but it's definitely really freaking tough in a lot of ways.
Could be worse, you could be in a PhD program. That's like someone telling you have have to run a long race, but they won't tell you how long it is. Could be a short as 15 miles, could be 50. So you run and you run without any idea what pace you should be keeping, and eventually you come to a stadium full of cheering people. You feel this must be the end, but you run into one side, do a lap, and then the course leads you back out.

Finally you come to another stadium, and you think "this HAS to be it." You make it inside and you do see the finish line, but you also see last 400 meters have hurdles.
 

JoshUNCW

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Yeah... with the job market right now, it's not quite as easy. Plus, I don't have internship experience because I spent my summers doing pre-med stuff/classes. =X
Computer science/computer engineering is probably one of the safer degrees you can get now. We still have a major shortage of CS engineers and an abundance of job offerings. Not really here nor there. But if someones still trying to figure out what degree to get. Not a bad option.
 

Narmerguy

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Computer science/computer engineering is probably one of the safer degrees you can get now. We still have a major shortage of CS engineers and an abundance of job offerings. Not really here nor there. But if someones still trying to figure out what degree to get. Not a bad option.
Yep. These guys are, I believe, the highest paid degrees on average right out of undergrad.