I've seen all the upsides...

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by Cerberus, Apr 2, 2004.

  1. Cerberus

    Cerberus Heroic Necromancer
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    The AF recruitment page makes those pretty clear... What about the downsides though? I'd love to hear some input.
     
  2. bobbyseal

    bobbyseal Boat boy
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    Hey man,
    Read some of the posts. This is being debated on a daily basis on these forums.
     
  3. Cerberus

    Cerberus Heroic Necromancer
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    Yeah, I posted this before I read enough of this forum...my bad. Thanks to millitarymed, I think I have been turned off of the Navy at least:laugh: :laugh:
     
  4. militarymd

    militarymd SDN Angel
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    My posts refer to the military in general.
     
  5. edmadison

    edmadison 1K Member
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    I wrote this three years ago, but most of it is still applicable:


    1) They decide where you will live. This may seem a bit adventurous, but remember there are both good and bad places you can end up.

    2) You can get deployed. This may take you away from your family for an extended period of time.

    3) You are an military officer and will be held to a high code of conduct. This is not bad, its just something to know about.

    4) Unlike a private practice physician, your patient's well being is not your only concern: unit readiness and other factors may effect your treatment.

    5) Being a good doctor will not be the sole factor upon which you are evaluated. Other factors such as physical fitness, administrative abilities and being a "team player" are also important.

    6) Bureaucracy -- Don't underestimate the government's ability to make simple things difficult. The civilian world can be bad too, however. You will probably have less support staff than in civilian life and therefor will be doing more paper work.

    8) After training you may get sent to a post where you are not using your skills to your fullest. Let's say you want to be an orthopedic surgeon. After you do your training, you are a sent to a base that does not have a large retiree population, you may not do many joint replacements. This is important because you will become rusty at a procedure that is important for civilian practice.

    9) After you finish, you may experience some prejudice because you served and/or trained in the military. Personally, I think this is B.S. because from everything I have heard the training programs are anywhere from above average to exceptional (depending on the program). However, there are still people out there that believe that doctors in the military are only there because they aren't good enough to make it in civilian practice. Unfortunately, you may be trying to get jobs with some of these people when you leave the military. Once again, I think this is wrong. But I have talked to some doctors who still believe it.

    10) After you serve on active duty you will still be in the reserves for a number of years. Another action like Desert Storm could result in your being called up and screwing up your life for a while.

    11) Finally, remember that the needs of the organization are always more important than the needs of any individual. This can include political needs. In other words, in rare circumstances, innocent people can get left holding the bag.


    These are most of the things that have been going through my head regarding the scholarship I hope to be offered. They are based on what I have read and my conversations with a number of people. Please use them as items to ponder rather than the absolute truth. Even with all these factors, I am still very positive about the possibility. But I will ad the admonishment I have heard from others. DO NOT do it just for the money.

    ----------------

    To these, I would add more based on my ADT experience and reading some from others.

    12) The boss of your clinic or hospital may be a nurse or a dentist. Even if her or she is a doc, they may be more interested in feeding the beast (beaurcracy) than in providing good patient care.

    13) For many procedure based specialty residencies, case volumes is much smaller than in the civilian world (1/3 for one 'pod I spoke to).

    I would take MilitaryMD's advice (paraphased): If you go in expecting to get screwed on a regular basis, you will be more likely to be happy.

    Ed
     

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