MD & DO [JAMA] Leave of Absence and Medical Student Placement Into Graduate Medical Education by Race and Ethnicity

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Mr.Smile12

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Leave of Absence and Medical Student Placement Into Graduate Medical Education by Race and Ethnicity


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It's hard for me to interpret interaction terms that come out of these statistical analyses. Is this right? You're screwed (for your chances of placing into residency) if you take a leave of absence, you're screwed if you're black, and you're extra screwed if you're a black person taking a leave of absence.
 
Kind of difficult to come to any strong conclusions about the consequences of taking an LOA without being able to account for the reason for the LOA. I wish they had included that in the analysis but I'm not sure that information is available.
 
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Nonsense. Too much emphasis has been placed on a signal that is not there. Try to focus on issues that are actually meaningful...

Like access to childcare and family support.

As a side note... JAMA publishes a lot of nonsense on race/ethnicity. I have an article in the works that refutes the impact of race/ethnicity on a specific pediatric outcome where JAMA published an article that said it was an important factor, but mine wont be published in such a high impact journal because the alternative is less interesting and en vogue.
 
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but mine wont be published in such a high impact journal because the alternative is less interesting and en vogue.
Welcome to modern academia, lol. I remember when I was a kid and I thought being a big scientist was about landing on the moon and curing cancer. This is a pretty pervasive problem. Even during my time in research pre-medical school, I remember often stumbling across analyses that barely met the threshold of statistical significance even after clearly cherry picked data showing up over and over again in what were considered the “top journals” in my field. The only thing these analyses had in common was that they were great fuel for the fire of modern social “justice” causes.
 
As a side note... JAMA publishes a lot of nonsense on race/ethnicity. I have an article in the works that refutes the impact of race/ethnicity on a specific pediatric outcome where JAMA published an article that said it was an important factor, but mine wont be published in such a high impact journal because the alternative is less interesting and en vogue.
You'll be lucky if u get published at all (not a dig at u).. Anything that portrays minorities or women as non-victims or even in a negative light will likely not get published.

I lost faith in academia a long time ago, just lies built on lies.
 
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It's hard for me to interpret interaction terms that come out of these statistical analyses. Is this right? You're screwed (for your chances of placing into residency) if you take a leave of absence, you're screwed if you're black, and you're extra screwed if you're a black person taking a leave of absence.
Screwed if you're black? I don't know about that man. Anyway, this article doesn't reach any conclusions but rather wants to know whether those who are more likely to take a LOA are affected in GME placement.
 
Feel like this is really worthless if they're not specifying the reason for LOA. My school assigns LOAs for personal, medical, and academic reasons.

Medical, I would hope, does not affect your match for obvious reasons.

Personal could either mean taking time off to raise kids, stress, take care of a family member, financial trouble, or even a research year, so I would also hope that doesn't affect match at all.

And academic is like, failed step 1 or failed some courses and can't continue but also don't need to completely redo a year.
 
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