blainera

2+ Year Member
Sep 27, 2014
27
3
Status
Pre-Medical
I just finished the last of my post-baccalaureate classes last week. I had been planning on applying this year, but since it was getting to be too late in the cycle I have decided to apply next year instead.
My question is do medical schools particularly care what kind of job I have during these 2 years or so until (hopefully) matriculation? I have a degree and previous work experience in finance, and I think that working again in finance would allow me to make the most money during these gap years. Do you think that this would be acceptable to med schools as long as I continue my medical volunteering? Or would it be better to try to get a medically related job where I would probably make less but gain some relevant experience? Thank you.
 
Oct 27, 2013
4,212
1,359
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I just finished the last of my post-baccalaureate classes last week. I had been planning on applying this year, but since it was getting to be too late in the cycle I have decided to apply next year instead.
My question is do medical schools particularly care what kind of job I have during these 2 years or so until (hopefully) matriculation? I have a degree and previous work experience in finance, and I think that working again in finance would allow me to make the most money during these gap years. Do you think that this would be acceptable to med schools as long as I continue my medical volunteering? Or would it be better to try to get a medically related job where I would probably make less but gain some relevant experience? Thank you.
As long as you have a job I do not think they will hold that against you, as long as it is something socially acceptable. Something medically related does help, but if you can't get that you still need to pay your bills, so you need to work. I had a classmate of mine who worked as an auto technician before coming to school, another was an iron worker. As long as you have a legal legitimate job that is socially acceptable, I do not see a medical school having a problem with it. And you can do your volunteer work on the side.
 

ROSC

2+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2015
206
118
South of the Mason Dixon
Status
Pre-Medical
I may have a bias opinion here. However, an EMT-Basic course would run you $800-1000 depending on where you go. Its typically 3-4 months, and would provide you with TONS of knowledge, and give you some hands on experience, deeper look into medicine with "boots on the ground", closer look at REAL patients, and you'll still be making a little money. EMS def gets dinged around on the forum, but I'll stand by it. Its an AMAZING tool if you see it as that, a stepping stone, a pathway, or an initial challenge. Many have made it a career choice, but not I. Just something to consider.